web analytics
Pain Facon Beaucaire - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

Announcement

Collapse

Community Cookbook Recipe Contest

Do you have a wood fired recipe that gets rave reviews from family and friends? Now is your opportunity to not only share it with other wood fired chefs and enthusiasts, but get rewarded, too! Starting June 1 through July 30, 2016 we are holding a Summer Wood Fired Recipe Contest and the winner will receive a $75.00 shopping spree in the Forno Bravo Store.

Submit your recipes through the Forno Bravo Community Cookbook “Submit a Recipe” button. The winner will be based on the number of votes the recipe receives. A link to the recipes will be posted on the Forno Bravo Facebook, Google+, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest pages and the Forum. To be eligible to win, your recipe must include a photo of the dish being cooked in your wood fired oven.
See more
See less

Pain Facon Beaucaire

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pain Facon Beaucaire

    I made these twice this weekend. I started all this baking stuff with "Dough" by Richard Bertinet. I love rolls and this was the first book I found that had the types of stuff I was looking for. Now I've largely moved beyond it, since it's somewhat a beginner book.

    Anyway I had not tried these yet and they looked pretty good. They turned out pretty good also.

  • #2
    Re: Pain Facon Beaucaire

    These look fabulous. Did you use sourdough? I looked Bertinet's book up and there they are so I'll try them. I'm with you about RB so don't consult his books very much. However, I know some people who took his classes and they have only good things to say about him.

    Annie
    "It's not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it's because we do not dare that things are difficult." ~ Seneca

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Pain Facon Beaucaire

      Thanks Annie!

      I'm glad you about the sourdough because I had a question. I used his "ferment" where I took a piece of dough a few months ago and added some extra flour and water (50%) and kept swapping a 7oz piece when I made dough.

      I left the ferment for about 3-4 weeks while I had fun with the Ciabatta. I was afraid it might have been pretty dead, but when I added the 7oz of fresh dough, it puffed right up.
      I used it to make the two batches of rolls and the flavor was great.

      Is that sourdough?
      Last edited by acbova; 03-02-2009, 09:18 AM. Reason: clairity

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Pain Facon Beaucaire

        I assume that the ferment was originally made using commercial yeast?? If so, then it's not strictly sourdough. You make a sourdough 'mother' or chef by just mixing unbleached flour and water (nothing else in my book, but some people use grapes or yoghurt or ...) and allow it to ferment and then feed it with more flour and water on a regular schedule. Then it can rest in the fridge when you are not using it.

        However, you probably have a close approximation as the amount of commercial yeast gets diluted every time you use some and feed it again. Without having more information, I'm not sure what you have. Do you ever add commercial yeast to it?

        Joe Ortiz's book "The Village Baker" has great instructions for getting a sourdough going.

        Annie
        "It's not because things are difficult that we do not dare, it's because we do not dare that things are difficult." ~ Seneca

        Comment

        Working...
        X