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Northern Ontario oven build

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  • #61
    New ovens have a tendency to smoke quite a bit during the initial fires,
    Russell
    Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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    • #62
      Hey Shawnr What gauge is that metal? Looks good!

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      • #63
        Thanks UtahBeehiver .

        hillscp I am not sure. It was just a piece of stainless that I had but I would guess 18 gauge. I cannot cut it with hand tin snips. Might even be 16. I will measure the thickness and let you know
        My build

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        • #64
          Got the roof on! Woo Woo!! In good shape now for winter.

          We are going with steel shingles and they are not on order yet (Sales guy has been off) but at least I got the water proofing membrane on so I can relax and quit playing with tarps. I will play around a bit over the next few days and finish closing it up better but feeling good about it.

          I am hesitating on the arch. In an earlier post #54, I showed the look of the 2 inch bricks in an arch. Not really big on that look but still trying to come up with something else, now that I mortared the side walls in. Something will come to me. We know we want an arch (versus a flat top) but the 2" full bricks don't look great, imho. Maybe 2 1/2" would have been better but stock was out at the time. I will keep surfing for other ideas. I am pondering cutting the bricks down (from say 4.5" to around 3" before putting them into the arch. Won't be as high but the sides are the full brick width. I could also cast a top for the tunnel and then face it with something that boss girl decides next summer. Any suggestions anyone?

          I had another fire today. I checked in the stand and found moisture (more like water) coming out of the drain holes. I ran a bit through them to make sure they were all clear and am surprised how much water was coming out. I did not really look before so not sure if the moisture was driven out by the fire today or has just been dripping all along. I don't doubt the insulation got wet during the build. As much as I was pretty strict on tarping it, the hearth still got wet so the insulation must have picked up more than I thought. The fire today was around 400 F with one high around 500. That might have been right over the fire at the time. I moved the fire around in the dome too. I was surprised how big the fire was to only get those temps. I think I read that as the moisture comes out, the temps will rise more quickly for a given amount of wood. Wood was relatively small, older birch branch stock (ie not split). The fire was going for several hours and I checked often with an IR gun to make sure I was not creeping up in temp. I hope I am understanding the curing process correctly. Several small fires increasing in temps. I think the longer lasting fires though would be more effective at forcing the moisture out.....as long at the temps do not increase beyond the expected.

          That is it for now.

          Cheers,

          Click image for larger version

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          My build

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          • #65
            Shawnr THanks. I'm referring to the metal studs I think theyre usually 18g. Probably doesn't matter much though once you screw the board to it.

            Nice work BTW

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            • #66
              hillscp that I do not know. I just went to the lumber yard and said I needed metal studs so probably the usual residential ones. I don't know much about them (and that is why you won't see any close ups of the framing....... )
              My build

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              • #67
                Roof is on. I have had several curing fires, although not always on successive days. I tried to up the temperatures (kind of averaging what my gun tells me) each day and on Sunday, the soot started clearing off the bricks. So I let it burn down and took advantage of the coals to cook something....all I had handy was burgers.

                Today, I thawed some frozen pizzas which I don't really expect to be very good anyways..(as I read here somewhere too as an option to making nice pizzas to practice with) . Glad I did...burnt the first one....well done in 3 minutes, but then, burnt the second one (both thin crust) and then, after waiting a bit before inserting the next one, burnt the third one....

                The pizzas were actually edible..... if one cut off the edge and did not mind a little over done,... but considering they were frozen ones, way better than from a kitchen oven! Now that I have done some cooking, I will go back to the cooking forums and get more tips/hints/direction. I think it will make more sense. I recall reading to heat the oven up, then let it cool down to around 800, then put pizzas in. Mine was less than that today. Oh well, I am sure it will get easier with practice.

                I had to make a quick peel as I have not gotten to that yet so just cut a 1/4" piece of ply wood for today. Sacrificial pizzas cooked on a sacrificial wooden peel. Good fun!!
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                My build

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