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  • #16
    Originally posted by microbe View Post
    I reckon the screen is needed on the underside to stop those damned mud-wasps
    Yes, you're probably right. I glue it on the topside because it might fall off on the underside. I might have to rethink that one, Thanks.

    I like those mud wasps, They are also known as Potters wasps, they look really big and scary but rarely sting unlike the nasty little black paper wasps who work in groups so you get hit by about 4 instead of just one. The Potters wasps love potteries because it gives them a ready source of processed soft clay.
    Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by david s View Post

      Yes, you're probably right. I glue it on the topside because it might fall off on the underside. I might have to rethink that one, Thanks.

      I like those mud wasps, They are also known as Potters wasps, they look really big and scary but rarely sting unlike the nasty little black paper wasps who work in groups so you get hit by about 4 instead of just one. The Potters wasps love potteries because it gives them a ready source of processed soft clay.
      I love them...except when I can't get my mower or brush cutter or chainsaw or fire pump or some other small engine started because they have built a nest in the perfectly sized exhaust pipe.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Gulf View Post
        + elevate the insulation off of the structural hearth.
        What is a good way to do that?

        Gotta say, so far this thread has been almost as helpful as all my other research combined. Thanks!

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        • #19
          That depends on what you can source. Some have used 2" concrete pavers. Some have used glass foam block. Some have used mosaic ceramic bathroom tiles that come already spaced on a sheet. The theory is to get the insulation above the structural hearth level where it can stay high and dry. You may be able to find some examples by using the key words "elevating insulation" in a search of the forum. You may have to change the key words get different examples.
          Joe Watson " A year from now, you will wish that you had started today" My Build Album / My Build

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          • #20
            Here is an example of elevating board insulation with ceramic tiles. A poured insulation would a require a fine mesh like window screen material or landscape fabric to prevent the spaces from being filled with insulation.
            Joe Watson " A year from now, you will wish that you had started today" My Build Album / My Build

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            • #21
              Here is what I ended up doing under the insulation layer on the hearth - the tiles (including lots more) cost me $2 at the local tip recycling shop.

              Click image for larger version

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              Click image for larger version

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              I hope this helps others

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              • #22
                Originally posted by david s View Post

                but use firebricks for the floor.

                .
                Hi David,
                Do you know of a supplier for the larger size floor bricks?
                Maybe, 300*300*50 would be good to minimise floor joints,
                Brad

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                • #23



                  I get mine from Sydney, but as it’s against the forum rules to provide supplier details, I can’t help you. Just search for “refractory materials”
                  The larger the piece, the more susceptible it is to cracking, because of uneven heating and the resulting thermal expansion difference. That is also why the floor bricks are best left un-mortared so they can expand and float freely. It also makes replacement easier. If a brick cracks in half it is simply reducing its size by itself and will not effect its performance.

                  Have you made some drain holes through the supporting slab so the moisture can escape?

                  That looks like a pretty thin supporting slab. Not sure of the weight it will have to support, but are you sure it's strong enough. The strength of a concrete slab is proportional to the square of its thickness. So for example a 4" thick slab is 4x as strong as a 2" thick one. You have a fairly wide span there as the slab does not cantilever over the supporting piers. Perhaps another supporting pier in the middle would be prudent if you think the slab is not thick enough.
                  Last edited by david s; 01-29-2022, 06:42 PM.
                  Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                  • #24
                    Try the Sydney firebrick company.
                    Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by david s View Post
                      I get mine from Sydney, but as it’s against the forum rules to provide supplier details, I can’t help you. Just search for “refractory materials”
                      To me this is a crazy rule. Not only does it go against the spirit of this forum (to share info) but it is the antithesis of the purpose of the internet. Yeah, I have read the reasons for doing it, but a couple of moderators should be able to handle the handful of posts that have direct links and weed out any that are spammy.

                      Originally posted by david s View Post
                      The larger the piece, the more susceptible it is to cracking, because of uneven heating and the resulting thermal expansion difference. That is also why the floor bricks are best left un-mortared so they can expand and float freely. It also makes replacement easier. If a brick cracks in half it is simply reducing its size by itself and will not effect its performance.

                      Have you made some drain holes through the supporting slab so the moisture can escape?
                      I sure have. Taking your advice ;o) Plus you might recall the exchange about flywire on the underside instead of the top to keep those potter wasps out.

                      Originally posted by david s View Post
                      That looks like a pretty thin supporting slab. Not sure of the weight it will have to support, but are you sure it's strong enough. The strength of a concrete slab is proportional to the square of its thickness. So for example a 4" thick slab is 4x as strong as a 2" thick one. You have a fairly wide span there as the slab does not cantilever over the supporting piers. Perhaps another supporting pier in the middle would be prudent if you think the slab is not thick enough.
                      It has steel mesh plus multiple 25mm steel bars running the full width. I am pretty confident it will hold, but thanks for the advice.
                      Last edited by microbe; 01-30-2022, 03:50 PM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by microbe View Post

                        ................To me this is a crazy rule. Not only does it go against the spirit of this forum (to share info) but it is the antithesis of the purpose of the internet. Yeah, I have read the reasons for doing it, but a couple of moderators should be able to handle the handful of posts that have direct links and weed out any that are spammy.................
                        I think that David gave you the name of the company in the very next post. That is acceptable by our forum rules. Just no direct hyperlinks to commercial sites. It's not very difficult for someone to cut and paste the key words into a browser IMO.

                        Joe Watson " A year from now, you will wish that you had started today" My Build Album / My Build

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by microbe View Post

                          To me this is a crazy rule. Not only does it go against the spirit of this forum (to share info) but it is the antithesis of the purpose of the internet. Yeah, I have read the reasons for doing it, but a couple of moderators should be able to handle the handful of posts that have direct links and weed out any that are spammy.



                          I sure have. Taking your advice ;o) Plus you might recall the exchange about flywire on the underside instead of the top to keep those potter wasps out.



                          It has steel mesh plus multiple 25mm steel bars running the full width. I am pretty confident it will hold, but thanks for the advice.
                          Thanks for the reminder re the mesh on the bottom, I now put it on both sides of the slab.

                          25mm of steel bar is huge and should be more than enough. There is a problem with thin slabs and steel reo in that there may not be enough embedment to prevent moisture entry to the steel, (Google correct position for slab rebar). I'm sure you'll be ok so long as the steel was placed in the middle and not sticking out the sides or close to the top or bottom surfaces. Driving on extensive overhead roads in Sicily is a nerve- wracking experience with LOTS of exposed rusty reo, bound for structural failure pretty soon. The whole island is riddled with it.

                          Apologies re the posting of supplier details. Utah has advised me it only applies to links. I had thought that it must be a directive from our generous hosts FB because they thought it might impact their sales, I was wrong.
                          Last edited by david s; 01-31-2022, 12:27 AM.
                          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                          • #28
                            I'm severely constrained by freight charges, particularly for bulky or heavy materials, being so far north.
                            As you're in the GC you might be able to save heaps by picking up yourself from Field Furnace Refractories in Brisbane.
                            Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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