Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chris' Sierra Build

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Just another note of consequence here, the fact you have used 6:1 precast p/vcrete means it will not be as good an insulation as the "normal" 5:1 mix. This would make me much more strongly advise putting the CaSil on top (just below the cooking floor). I honestly don't know where you got the lime addition info, it's used in homebrew mortar and renders not the base insulation. It certainly won't hurt, but you shouldn't experience temps in the subfloor layer high enough to break down the Portland but might in the dome. The Hydrated Lime can tolerate higher temps and is slightly flexible when cured and thus more resistant to cracking. Portland cement will indeed break down under temps within the range of pizza oven firing, so the lime addition in the mortar is recommended. Once the dome is completed, it is self-supporting and could lose or have most of its mortar cracked and still be structurally sound (see photo below of Sorrento, Italy oven I once used).

    Yes, your pcrete sections probably still contain a significant amount of water which needs to be driven out by the multiple, stepped curing fires, and in many cases just more time being used after curing.
    Mike Stansbury - The Traveling Loafer
    Roseburg, Oregon

    FB Forum: The Dragonfly Den build thread
    Available only if you're logged in = FB Photo Albums-Select media tab on profile
    Blog: http://thetravelingloafer.blogspot.com/

    Comment


    • #17
      Hey mike just curious what that little door to the right of the oven is above??
      My build:: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...nch-wfo-hawaii

      Comment


      • #18
        That is the rusted metal door for the oven. If you look closely around the door edges you'll note the metal had rusted completely through in spots. I'm pretty sure the oven had no insulation to speak of either...I could do pizzas at a relatively low temp while having a pretty good active fire (and moving the coals constantly across the floor to recharge after each pizza). I barely could coax out enough retained heat to do bread loaves...they were pretty "blond" but with a little Italian wine, still tasted good!
        Mike Stansbury - The Traveling Loafer
        Roseburg, Oregon

        FB Forum: The Dragonfly Den build thread
        Available only if you're logged in = FB Photo Albums-Select media tab on profile
        Blog: http://thetravelingloafer.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #19
          Small question?

          Isn't a 6:1 more insulation that a 5:1? I base that on the dome being a 10:1?

          Thank you,

          Chris

          Comment


          • #20
            Your answer is in this table. A slight increase in insulation value at a cost of around half the strength.

            Click image for larger version  Name:	image_83170 2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	146.2 KB ID:	435758
            Last edited by david s; 02-23-2021, 08:46 PM.
            Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Travelinman View Post
              Small question?

              Isn't a 6:1 more insulation that a 5:1? I base that on the dome being a 10:1?

              Thank you,

              Chris
              Sorry Chris, I had a brain fart. Yes 6:1 is slightly better insulation, but its compression strength is not nearly as good (shown in the table above that David S posted). What that translates to: you probably would get some cooking bricks "sinking in" a bit in spots over time or and if your dome is laid directly on it, the dome will likely shift & crack. Putting the FB board on top evenly distributes the weight loads & your cooking floor will stay level.
              Last edited by SableSprings; 02-24-2021, 09:09 AM.
              Mike Stansbury - The Traveling Loafer
              Roseburg, Oregon

              FB Forum: The Dragonfly Den build thread
              Available only if you're logged in = FB Photo Albums-Select media tab on profile
              Blog: http://thetravelingloafer.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #22
                David:

                Thanks for the table.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Mike:

                  Nice photos of the ancient WFO in Sorrento!

                  I was looking for the old photos of the pizza oven that I visited in Madrid. I took a couple of the internet. They let me use their tools and spin at few suckling pig platters in their large WFO. "The oldest ongoing restaurant in the world" Restaurante Botin

                  I opened a restaurant (Trattoria) in 1992. Before I opened, I visited many restaurants in USA and Europe. I ended up buying a reasonable Italian WFO and hauling to the mountains from LA. I remember the difficult job of lifting the heavy oven core into position on a steel stand. It did not come with instructions!!

                  That little 32"-34"" oven raged seven days a week for 8 hours a day; lots of Pizzas and baked dishes in an Exhibition Kitchen.

                  Note: We did not insulation around the core, very well. Some fiberglas. The core purchased did not seem to have a lot of lighter insulation. I am glad we are discussing the insulation, but it really worked out well for us with a simple vented enclosure. So I will continue to read and learn, but many dishes around the world were built without CaSi and modern techniques.

                  Mike, How did the insulate the Sorrento WFO in your photos? How did they insulate older Pompeii ovens. I did not ask, when I visited the Naples areas a couple of years, ago.

                  Thanks, Chris



                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Chris, the WFO in Sorrento that I used was built into the side of a hill. Based on the extremely poor heat retention I experienced, I suspect only the dirt backfill was "the insulation". It certainly seemed more oriented to live fire cooking or the hillside soil was moist enough when I was there to absorb a lot of the fire's heat. It's really fun to be allowed to work/access other WFO systems, especially in other countries at active sites.

                    My understanding on old WFO insulations, the use of clay/straw (like cobb ovens do today) & pumice type stone were used. Don't really remember when I was in Pompeii anything about the oven insulation...but I suspect it's documented somewhere on the Internet by now. Certainly people didn't worry as much about using up resources inefficiently in the centuries before us, so I'm sure they used a LOT more wood with those old, poorly insulated (compared to today's standards) masonry/rock ovens.
                    Mike Stansbury - The Traveling Loafer
                    Roseburg, Oregon

                    FB Forum: The Dragonfly Den build thread
                    Available only if you're logged in = FB Photo Albums-Select media tab on profile
                    Blog: http://thetravelingloafer.blogspot.com/

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X