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Newby Build Templestowe, Melbourne Australia

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  • MarkJerling
    replied
    Wow! Great work.

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    started here

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    finished

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    and more...

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  • shelbyright
    replied

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    some more again

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    and some more

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    here are some more

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    so here are some pics of the build. all finished.

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  • SableSprings
    replied
    George, optimum working height is a personal thing, but you don't want to have to bend over too far to see (and do peel work) deep into the oven and you don't want to lift up into the oven. Most of us have settled with a cooking floor height of about elbow height or slightly above (when standing). Try holding a peel (or just a stick) and imagine the motion of picking up the pizza and putting it into the oven. Your arms will "tell" you what feels like the right height. If you really want to get visual, cut a piece of cardboard out with what you are planning for your oven opening. Have someone hold it at various heights and again think about looking into the oven and placing the pizza onto the cooking floor using the cardboard mock-up.

    Be aware that if you make it perfect height for yourself, your significant other or one of your friends might find it too tall or too low. It's important to make sure you add all the vertical components together to come up to the height you decide on--blocks, base slab, moisture barrier, insulation, sand/fireclay floor set, and the cooking floor itself. If you mortar instead of dry stack the blocks, it adds 1/4" for each joint...mortar 4 blocks on top of each other and to the foundation and it's an extra inch to your final height...

    As to your total dimensions for a 42" oven using half firebricks (4.5") and say 4" of dome insulation, it would be 42+(4.5x2)+(4x2) = 59" without any outside stone cladding. Add an inch or so for a cladding base and 2" for the stone cladding and you are looking at 59 + 2 + 4 = 65" diameter of your finished dome. But of course you will need to have some additional working space outside of that to get between the oven and the pergola post. So, your projected 52" to the front might be too tight (although I might be reading your drawing incorrectly). I hope that helps at least to give you some basic thoughts/guide on the placement.

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    i am now going to start planning my slab layout for my oven.
    '
    couple of questions please. what is the optimum working height for my oven i was thinking somewhere between 1.2 and 1.4 mtrs.(4' and 4'8")

    also i am doing a 200mm (8") Thick slab which will be level with my paving slabe and 20mm (3/4 Inch) tiles will go on top of this. and as it going to be in a corner and incorporate the retaining wall, and the post for my pergola structure in the corner (or maybe the sides?) i would like to know what i need to allow for as i am planning a 42" oven.

    i was thinking of a slab dimension from the wall of 2050mm (80 and 3/4 Inches) across the back and 1320mm (52 inches) to the front as per the attached drawing; i would like to allow for cladding the oven in stone etc.

    Am i leaving enough space for the oven and post.

    any help would be appreciated

    Cheers
    Attached Files

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  • shelbyright
    replied
    i am now going to start planning my slab layout for my oven.
    '
    couple of questions please. what is the optimum working height for my oven i was thinking somewhere between 1.2 and 1.4 mtrs.(4' and 4'8")

    also i am doing a 200mm (8") Thick slab which will be level with my paving slabe and 20mm (3/4 Inch) tiles will go on top of this. and as it going to be in a corner and incorporate the retaining wall, and the post for my pergola structure in the corner (or maybe the sides?) i would like to know what i need to allow for as i am planning a 42" oven.

    i was thinking of a slab dimension from the wall of 2050mm (80 and 3/4 Inches) across the back and 1320mm (52 inches) to the front as per the attached drawing; i would like to allow for cladding the oven in stone etc.

    Am i leaving enough space for the oven and post.

    any help would be appreciated

    Cheers
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • oasiscdm
    replied
    Hi George

    Have responded to your PM. Happy to help you however I can. Nice to have a local building. I wont start my new oven until I finish moving which I start on the weekend coming. I have most of my materials handy but since my job fell in a heap last week arrrrgggghhh. I have the time to build new oven but a lot to do before I start.

    Just ask and I will try and help.

    Cheers


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  • shelbyright
    replied
    Originally posted by david s View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]n391519[/ATTACH] Just to add to Mike's warning about proximity to the wall, you actually have way more of a problem when you put an oven in a corner. Working the outer layers of the oven down near the base of the dome gets really difficult if you can't get behind it. Also you are left with a pretty much unusable space in the corner behind the oven once it's finished. Depending on what your walls are made of you might like to consider blending the oven into the walls and fill the corner at the back with plastic bottles with their lids on and cover it in vermicrete. Attached pic is such a solution, but you have to look pretty close on the left hand side to see it.

    Thanks David, That is a great idea! i think i will be surely be doing something along those lines. the corner was going to be open and it is accessible from the back, but i may build the corner wall in and seal the back anyways.

    Cheers,

    G

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  • david s
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Mark and Jenny Stevens ovenjpg copy.jpg
Views:	170
Size:	462.3 KB
ID:	391519 Just to add to Mike's warning about proximity to the wall, you actually have way more of a problem when you put an oven in a corner. Working the outer layers of the oven down near the base of the dome gets really difficult if you can't get behind it. Also you are left with a pretty much unusable space in the corner behind the oven once it's finished. Depending on what your walls are made of you might like to consider blending the oven into the walls and fill the corner at the back with plastic bottles with their lids on and cover it in vermicrete. Attached pic is such a solution, but you have to look pretty close on the left hand side to see it.

    Leave a comment:

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