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Pros and cons of two different style pizza ovens - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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  • Pros and cons of two different style pizza ovens

    Hi all!
    im currently deciding between two different builder for my WFO,
    bothe dome brick ovens, one however is exposed bricks, and the other is more the Pompeii style dome with then insulation blanket and perlite render followed by a render to seal.

    I love the the look of the exposed brick, but am worried it won't work as well.
    What are the pros and cons of both styles?

    photos as an example:

  • #2
    I just approved you post but your pictures are not coming through. You may need to reattach them.

    I am confused by "exposed" brick. Are we talking a brick veneer on the oven after the insulation or is there no insulation on the oven. If the later, I would suggest you really consider insulating the oven.

    Here is a link of some of the more documented build on the forum
    https://community.fornobravo.com/for...n-the-archives
    Russell
    Build Link............... Picassa Photo Album Link

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    • #3
      Take two on the photos

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      • #4
        The outer shell of the oven is really your choice. The key is to make sure there is sufficient insulation of the dome in order to best utilize the heat from the oven. There are quite a few So. Hemi builds so check out the regional section of the forum. You should have at a "bare" minimum 2" of CaSi or equivalent material on the dome and floor and make sure none of the floor or dome have direct contact with the hearth floor. Your post indicates you are having it built but it is really important you understand the mechanics of the build since sometimes the so called expert contractors and not so expert. Good luck
        Russell
        Build Link............... Picassa Photo Album Link

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        • #5
          I would add "and keep it dry" to the keys. Insulation is key, but an all masonry build will be difficult to keep dry if exposed to the weather year round
          My build progress
          My WFO Journal on Facebook
          My dome spreadsheet calculator

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          • #6
            Many thanks, sorry I've been away.
            The build has 2inch Cal Sil board specified, on top of s layer of sand on top of a suspended re-enforced concrete slab.

            Im having the stand fabricated out of Galvanized square tube to save weight as the oven will be on a low lying deck. The deck has been re-enforced but I still want to save weight as a precaution. I've had an engineer cast an eye over the deck design and he's happy with it up to 2500kg.
            Have you had much experience with such a structure? I was building the stand out of 3/32" thick 2.5"x2.5" tube, with a heap of bracing. Im just hoping it will stand up to the job!
            Last edited by smeltitdeltit; 08-05-2017, 03:46 PM.

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            • #7
              I like the 'looks' of the brick on the outside too. However, I WOULD NOT build the oven in the picture because it appears the opening for the chimney is not in the most efficient location for a high heat oven. The pompeii style oven will hold more heat, use less wood, heat faster and cook longer than the other style of oven. Hands down, build the pompeii style!

              Added: Welcome to the forum
              Last edited by Lburou; 08-06-2017, 10:34 AM.
              Lee B.
              DFW area, Texas, USA

              If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.

              I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

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