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Silky, Stretchable Dough - How?????? - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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  • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

    Originally posted by dmun View Post
    Rolling pins are for pitas and piecrusts.
    Yes indeed - I was at pizza place in town recently (Woodpeckers) and they shoved the dough into a machine which "rolled" it for pizza use. I am sure that that is pretty much the same as attacking it with a rolling pin.

    I am ashamed to admit it but I too used to employ the services of a rolling pin for pizza preparation. I had to fight the dough and wrestle it into shape. That was until I did some reading and was guided some of the good folk here and let the dough rest before working it. That made all the difference and there was no turning back from that point. Nice workable dough without the need for a rolling pin...

    Rossco
    / Rossco

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    • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

      Originally posted by heliman View Post
      Nice workable dough without the need for a rolling pin...

      Rossco
      And thats what I hope to get next time I do pizzas...

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      • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

        Great - you're nearly there...

        I look forward to seeing the pics!!

        Rossco
        / Rossco

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        • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

          Hey guys! Let's not demean using a rolling pin. Many people struggle with the dough and find it useful as they strive to make reasonable shapes. Some (personal experience included) have gotten so frustrated they tried rollingpins on wet doughs and created a dough encrusted rolling pin. (Not quite but I couldn't pass up the visual image!)

          I don't do video but I will do a series of photos to try to document what I do. I think I can get the ideas across.

          Bake On!
          Jay

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          • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

            I don't believe that it is "demeaning" to suggest that the rolling pin is not the best tool for the job when it comes to stretching dough. The FB handbook and numerous other resources claim that it compacts the dough and has a negative impact on the finished product. I included a little bit of "tounge-in-cheek" referencing to highlight my (and probably others too) frustration in dealing with uncooperative dough. My point was simply to say that there are better and easier ways to stretch dough than using a rolling pin.

            That being said, I have no doubt that the rolling pin has numerous and indeed noble applications (like a welcoming implement for use by your wife when returning late from the pub).

            Rossco
            / Rossco

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            • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

              I'll be the first one to admit that part of the anti-rolling pin sentiment is partly snob appeal. But the fact remains that if you want to get the kind of oven spring on the edge of the crust that makes for a great pizza experience, you can't squeeze all the air out of the dough.
              My geodesic oven project: part 1, part 2

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              • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                Thanks for clarifying that dmun...

                I have certainly found a difference between stretched and rolled dough and the logic behind it makes a lot of sense too. It all gets down to personal preference I suppose...

                Rossco
                / Rossco

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                • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                  Hi Rossco, dmun, and all!

                  My comments weren't intended to suggest the rolling pin gives equal results. Like most of us, I prefer the texture of hand shaped. And the spring of the cornicione is certainly not as good when rolled. My point was that it is hardly a disaster to roll and that those who are struggling shouldn't feel like failures if they want to try rolling. I wouldn't encourage WFO owners to be satisfied with rolled pizza and never gaining competence at hand forming. OTOH, if they are happy, that is a personal decision. Just as our preference for hand formed!

                  Bake On!
                  Jay

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                  • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                    Hey all,
                    I agree with the whole hand forming Vs rolling pin debate...it looks a lot better when you hand stretch your dough. But I have found if you are careful and handle the dough 'softly' when using the rolling pin you still get very good results. Either way you do it....pizzas baked in a WFO kick ass over any done by Dominos or Pizza Hut or Eagle Boys hands down any day of the week!!! And like what was said before...most people who have sampled my WFO Pizzas dont know the difference if it has been rolled or stretched!! The only other thing I will add is we like to put everything out on the bench for people to make their own pizzas...adds to the experence...and for most people, rolling the dough is so much easier and a lot of fun. When all the kids start making their pizzas, rolling is the way to go. Could you imagine the dissapointment if I said to them 'you must stretch the dough as it is the only way to do it and if you dont you will be struck down by the pizza gods with a flame of tomato sauce and bacon followed by a shower of Olive Oil!!'. HAHAHAHA!!! Sorry couldnt help myself....I still will be trying to stretch the dough by hand just to see the difference but I wont be getting stressed if it doesnt come off.
                    Last edited by scottz; 01-31-2010, 03:23 PM. Reason: spelling

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                    • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                      I tried the MYO option for a while but found that guests tended to do everything wrong - normally putty waaaaay too much topping on too. I also found though that if you made the base for them and showed them how to do it they tended to get the idea and things were better. The best though was training an Italian friend to do all the toppings and I just prepared the base and tomato sauce. We also did a "make a new shape" pizza ... which of course encouraged the sick and twisted (the majority) among the guest to make all sorts of rude shapes heheheh!!!

                      At the end of the day though it depends on how serious you take your baking as the methods you employ in making pizzas will reflect this. I think many (possibly the majority) in this forum take this business very seriously and in a way treat it as some sort of art form. After all, anyone can make pizzas but making good pizzas is actually quite difficult to do as I have learned from the very knowledgeable people here. The body of knowledge in pizza making is certainly quite large and in so doing people have "perfected" the pizza making process and identified what does and what does not work. The likes of Peter Rhinehart make a business on imparting this knowledge to others. If there was not a right and a wrong way to baking pizzas he would be out of a job. So, I like to know the "right" way to do things so I can at least not waste my time learning bad habits.

                      Rossco
                      / Rossco

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                      • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                        I agree with you Rossco...the better you make the dough the better the pizzas turn out. In regards to letting people make their own pizzas, they do pile the toppings on to start with, because thats what most people think pizzas should look like. When we had the in-laws over at xmas we showed them that the less toppings the better. Of course they didnt believe us until they tasted them. I agree once you educate people, they know how to make better pizzas. But I have found if all the kids that come to our place make their own pizzas (including rolling the dough) they eat every single bit and get a real kick out of it. I agree that making pizza is an art...and with everyones advise and by reading alot of the threads on here I know my pizzas are getting better!!

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                        • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                          Originally posted by heliman View Post
                          I think many (possibly the majority) in this forum take this business very seriously and in a way treat it as some sort of art form. After all, anyone can make pizzas but making good pizzas is actually quite difficult to do as I have learned from the very knowledgeable people here.
                          Hi Rossco,
                          I just wanted to let you know, that you are one of the very knowledgeable people on this forum. This thread that you have so diligently continued until you had your dough making perfected has gotten me from making dough to making an excellant Pizza dough! THANK YOU SO MUCH!
                          Originally posted by heliman View Post
                          The body of knowledge in pizza making is certainly quite large and in so doing people have "perfected" the pizza making process and identified what does and what does not work. ... So, I like to know the "right" way to do things so I can at least not waste my time learning bad habits.
                          Rossco
                          Everyone on this thread should be commended for such a great job. I made the BEST pizza dough I could ever have just imagined making last night. My neighbors who I have put through MANY test pies, thought my dough was perfect! Light airy crispy and flavorful. They have endured the tough, chewy, tasteless tries in the past and know how poor my other doughs were made. No more wasted dough! Now if I can have a repeat performance that would be nirvana!
                          Again Thanks to all
                          John
                          Build Thread:http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/i...ome-15521.html
                          Photos: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/brick-...67884/pic/list
                          Oven Blog: http://johns-brickoven.blogspot.com/...ven-folly.html

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                          • Re: Silky, Stretchable Dough - How??????

                            Hello John - thanks for the feedback and glad to hear you are happy with your pizza results. As you pointed out - lots of contributors added value to the thread which I guess is what this forum is all about.

                            I have been a bit quiet of late due to overseas travels and a few other distractions, but I have been back at the pizza making wheel for the last few weeks which has been good. My method is always to make a biga starter the night before. If I make the main batch of dough early enough in the day it is proofed on the bench and ready for some evening pizza making. The light pizza style is great and very easy eating. I noticed that characterisitic with the Da Michele pizzas that I sampled while in Naples last year.

                            Another thing I find helps is starting the oven the day before you plan to cook. That gets rid on any moisture and really gets the oven running well. I have until recently kept the fire going continuously but lately start it on Thursday night and run it the whole weekend. I give it a few days to rest and be cleaned in between.

                            I look forward to seeing some of your pizza creations so hopefully you will post some on the forum soon.
                            / Rossco

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