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Burnt crusts - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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  • #16
    Re: Burnt crusts

    I chased leoparding for a while and have found the sweet spot for the base to be at 379c to produce a mild spotting of char on the base.

    The get the spots on the top, I just crank the flames up very high (licking around the roof) and it produces good leoparding.

    I have found a good 2 day fermentation with biga starter works consistently well for making spots.
    / Rossco

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    • #17
      Re: Burnt crusts

      easy fix is to just lift pizza on peel a few inchs from the top of the dome as soon as the base is at the desired level of browning;
      you can then finish the cheese and toppings to desired level in a few more moments. I use this technique frequently and it allows you to adjust for all the variables previously quoted.
      good luck!

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      • #18
        Re: Burnt crusts

        Originally posted by lag View Post
        easy fix is to just lift pizza on peel a few inchs from the top of the dome as soon as the base is at the desired level of browning;
        you can then finish the cheese and toppings to desired level in a few more moments. I use this technique frequently and it allows you to adjust for all the variables previously quoted.
        good luck!
        Called the Jimmy Hendrix, "excuse me while I kiss the sky"
        The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

        My Build.

        Books.

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        • #19
          Re: Burnt crusts

          Hi TS!

          Back to your pies...when the bottom is done and the top is a bit light, try lifting the pie up into the top of the dome. It is typically a lot hotter up there and can finish the top quickly without doing much to the bottom!

          (you probably know that by now but I am confident there are others who don't!)

          Jay

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          • #20
            Re: Burnt crusts

            How soon after you move the coals over to the side are you putting your pizza's in? The floor is red hot under the coals and it takes 15-20 minutes or more to cool a little. I keep a bank of coals off to the side, throw a stick of wood in every so often to keep some flame licking the top of the dome. Turn the pizza's while cooking to make sure they have even heat. Different parts of the oven have different temps. Move it around. I do not use corn flour as I find it burns quickly if the oven floor is too hot.

            Rick

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            • #21
              Re: Burnt crusts

              Just as mixing dough by the cup is imprecise and invites problems, so is trying to proof bread or decide when an oven is ready by time. There are way too many variables for time to be consistent. And your oven, the wood (and size) you burn, how long you fire, etc. are all factors.

              Your comments suggest you don't have an infrared thermometer, which is nice, but IMO not necessary. You quite simply want to wait until the hearth temperature reaches the appropriate temperature (which is a function of your personal taste, the dough, the style of pie (thicker/thinner/etc). A good rule of thumb which I have repeated way too many times on this forum is to toss about a quarter to half teaspoon of flour or semolina onto the hearth. And count by seconds with the toss at zero. The flour will suddenly turn black at some point. The goal on my oven with my dough etc. is for the flour to turn black at count "three". If you toss the flour in and it instantly turns black (and I am guessing yours will) it is WAY TOO HOT! Counts from 2 to 5 typically work okay.

              There is NO WAY to tell how hot the hearth is without doing something like the above, having an infrared thermometer, or having a lot of experience. And if you don't have any idea how hot the hearth is how can you expect to get consistent results? You can't!

              I have been doing this for six years and I always check the hearth (with flour) before I start baking pizza because I don't see any point in guessing and serving pizza that is below my ability. (Once you are too the right range it should stay there a while...but if it the oven gets slow the flour approach also gives you an idea how cold the oven is so you can rake coals back over the floor, recharge, and get back in the zone.

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              • #22
                Re: Burnt crusts

                I agree, I also use the semolina on the floor as a temp. gauge. All the fancy electronic temp equipment is not necessary. For baking and roasting the fist in the centre of the oven is also highly reliable. Hold your arm in for 3 secs before discomfort and your oven will be arounf 250 C
                Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                • #23
                  Re: Burnt crusts

                  Hi David!

                  Good rule of thumb! Only weakness is variation in "discomfort" but...as for semolina, a bit of experience can help one hone in on the right answer.

                  Jay

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