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  • vseprosto90211
    replied
    I really like coffee and I've been dreaming about gaining a coffee machine for a long time. I've been saving money every month and finally bought EspressoWorks All-In-One Barista Bundle Set coffee maker. I used to brew coffee every morning and it was a little bit time consuming for me, but now, my morning coffee routine is a real contemplation.
    Last edited by vseprosto90211; 02-05-2020, 09:58 PM.

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  • sammy
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Huh....I guess I never really noticed the barter section. I will go check it out. Do you still spend time in the states from time to time?

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  • gjbingham
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    I do home roasting with a Hot Top Roaster. I order my beans from Sweet Maria's (.com). It's pretty easy to do, but the roaster puts out tons of smoke and cleaning it every six or so roasts is laborious, especially when you can only roast 500g at a time. It sure is nice to have truely fresh coffee every day though.

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  • james
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Sammy,

    Let's trade coffee for Caputo flour. Why don't you offer you your coffee in the Barter section? I'm in.

    James
    Last edited by james; 01-13-2008, 01:33 PM.

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  • sammy
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    I do roast....for a handful of local customers (and myself, of course). The offer is open if you want some... :-)

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  • Ken524
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Thanks Sammy! I'll play with the grinder a bit. I also noticed that I can let the Moka sit for a bit and let some of the powder settle before pouring.

    Thanks for the offer of the coffee! Where do you get it? Do you roast your own? Do you sell coffee?

    Leave a comment:


  • sammy
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Great gifts! That is awesome!!!

    I think that might just be one of the downfalls of some blade grinders. Blade grinders chop at the beans at high speeds where burr grinders shave the beans at lower speeds. Due to the way they work, the blade grinders introduce some heat and inconsistancy in the grind. Just like anything you put in a grinder, you will have some stuff that gets pulverated while some is still chunky.

    Before I got a burr grinder, I would pulse the on-off switch while I shook (lightly) my grinder to try to get a more consistant grind. I also would wait about a minute before I started to drink my coffee (to allow the grounds to settle and the coffee to cool) and then I just didn't drink the last sip or two (since there would be grounds on the bottom).

    I think you are going about it right, though - you want to go fine enough that you get a full extraction while not so fine that you get a ton of grounds escaping and settling in your cup.

    I am at a conference, but pass on your mailing address and I will send you a pound or two of some really good coffee to celebrate :-) ssiegel@amesic.com

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  • Ken524
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Coffee Gurus:

    I received a 9 cup Moka Express and Cuisinart blade grinder for Christmas. I've tried different sizes of grind (fine to course) but always seem to get a bit of powdery coffee grinds in my cup. Is that the norm or am I doing something wrong?

    Thanks!

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  • james
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Pizza, coffee and a good baguette -- the staples of life. :-) That and red wine.

    I have a four year-old Rancilio espresso machine, and got a Rancilio grinder a few months ago. Grinding fresh beans as you need them makes a big difference. But finding good beans at a reasonable cost is difficult. The Italian coffees (Illy and Lavazza) seem to be stale by the time they get here. I've been experimenting with U.S. blends.

    Getting great crema and perfect milk froth is as hard as making pizza napoletana. :-)

    James

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  • christo
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    My wife is the coffee junkie in our house.

    I'm sure i'll be labelled a blasphemer but.....

    She bought a Tassimo coffee maker for those one or two cup days. The Gevalia Crema pak makes a tasty cup to me.

    My boss has a steam driven expresso machine and the lattes that come out of that are wonderful - the machine is bigger than my microwave!

    Christo

    Leave a comment:


  • PizzaPolice
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Wow! ...And I thought I was living the good life with my $15 Senseo.
    Damn Juan Valdez. He started this mess... #@%$& Mountain Grown!

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  • sammy
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    I posted a longer reply, but something must have happend because I don't see it out there.

    Yah, those beans sit in those bins for a long time also. If I were you, and I had to do one thing to improve the quality of my coffee at home, I would buy a grinder before investing in a new brewing method. If you have a little cone filter and you are pooring directly into that (i.e., not using a drip machine), your method should actually give you pretty good results if you have good beans.

    Tips...buy a cheap burr grinder (they shave the beans instead of chopping them - giving more surface area for brewing and generating less heat (which isn't the best thing for the beans/grounds)). If you can't afford a decent burr grinder, the best blade grinder I know of is actually fairly inexpensive - the Bodum C-Mill, but as with all blade grinders, it operates like a blender and will generate some heat, which isn't the best thing for the beans.

    In general, you want to grind your beans as fine as you can without them seaping through your filter and into your cup of joe. If your cone filter and grounds are at the right balance, the idea brew time (water in to water out) should be about 2 min. The best thing to do is...boil the water, take it off the burner for about 5 seconds (to allow it to drop closer to 190-200 deg F - the ideal brewing temp), then pour just enough water in to pre-saturate your grounds. After this, pour more water in to brew the rest of the cup of coffee.

    That is actually one of the better ways to brew coffee, and it is low maintenance and fast clean up.

    The next tip is to stop buying your coffee from the grocery store and find a local coffee shop that roasts their coffee on site :-) Let me know (ssiegel@amesic.com) if and when you get yourself a grinder and I will roast you something fresh to see what I am talking about :-) Actually, many local shops are hackers who misroast their beans just like the people who do it for the grocery stores. Anyway, let me know and I will send you something tasty to experiment with :-)

    Have fun

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  • Ken524
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Originally posted by sammy View Post
    Do you buy beans or grounds? Do you own a grinder? Burr or blade?
    I'm pretty unsophisticated about coffee. I buy ground coffee in the coffee isle of the grocery store. Sometimes I'll buy a bag of beans and use those in-store grinders (the kids love to dump the beans in and see the grounds come out ). I have no idea if those grinders have burrs, blades (or heaven knows what else) in them - I probably don't want to know.

    Grounds stay freshest for about two days after ground.
    Oops.
    But I do store them in a cool dark place.

    In all seriousness, I am considering buying a small grinder to grind a few days worth of coffee at a time. I can justify that. And the Moka machines are so inexpensive, it would be fun to get one to play with.

    Thanks for the feedback!

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  • sammy
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    A moka machine will give you a different type of brew, but not necessarily a better cup of joe....and a Moka is not an espresso and neither are a traditional drip brew - they all go for something different. Do you buy beans or grounds? Do you own a grinder? Burr or blade?

    In general beans stay freshest for about two weeks after they are roasted. Grounds stay freshest for about two days after ground. Both should be kept in a dark, cool, dry location - and NOT the fridge or freezer where they will absorb other smells and flavors.

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  • rlf5
    replied
    Re: Coffee Machines

    Ken

    The ceramic cooktop should be fine.

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