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Using Refractory Mortar to skin Vermicrete dome - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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Using Refractory Mortar to skin Vermicrete dome

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  • Using Refractory Mortar to skin Vermicrete dome

    I know this is not ideal and may be a silly question, but I'm looking to see if its possible to use Refractory Mortar (purchased from Forno Bravo) to apply a skin to the inside of a vermicrete dome that I just completed.
    The only Refractory Cement I can find local is Rutlan, which seems to have mixed reviews when applied with a trowel (seems to need a form). I have a lot of Mortar so wanted to check and see if that would work in place of cement for a skin.

    If not, Alternatively, can the mortar mix be modified to make it more suitable to use as a skin? (I also have SS Needles if that helps)

  • #2
    I would expect any skin coat applied to the inside of the dome to fail

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    • #3
      I'm afraid that Toomulla is right. Also, the needles may work in a full thick cast dome. But, I would be afraid of them in a parge coat. If the parge with needles fails, they could end up in your food .

      EDIT: Just wondering if this oven is another victim of the infamous medicine ball vermiculite/perlite video?
      Last edited by Gulf; 05-22-2018, 03:21 PM.
      joe watson

      "A year from now, you will wish that you had started today "

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      • #4
        Here is a link to an answer to a similar question a few weeks ago. I did not want to say it but I totally agree with the advice that was given.
        joe watson

        "A year from now, you will wish that you had started today "

        My Build
        My Picasa Web Album

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        • #5
          Apart from a resulting thin layer being likely to fail the substrate it is applied to, in this case vermicrete, needs to be a bit moist or water in the applied layer will be sucked out leaving insufficient for the hydration process. Also if the substrate is too wet it will interfere with achieving a good bond. So not dry, but not too wet. Give it a try wed be interested to hear how you go.
          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the feedback and insights. Given feedback that thin layer will likely fail I plan on using a mold to do a refractory casing (mixed with SS needles) that's thicker. Will report back on how it goes

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