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Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

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  • david s
    replied
    Try doing a search on the forum for mobile or trailer ovens.

    Leave a comment:


  • skeleturtle
    replied
    Originally posted by Brandon Gilbreath View Post
    Hello,

    Thanks so much so showing the science behind the different types of ovens! Do you or anyone know of a fairly comprehensive DIY guide to building a round oven on a mobile platform?
    If anyone can respond to this, that be great I too need a comprehensive DIY guide to building a mobile Pizza oven!

    Leave a comment:


  • Brandon Gilbreath
    replied
    Hello,

    Thanks so much so showing the science behind the different types of ovens! Do you or anyone know of a fairly comprehensive DIY guide to building a round oven on a mobile platform?

    Leave a comment:


  • americanteek
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Ovens are Round

    Originally posted by james View Post
    There are about a million pizza ovens in Italy, and they are all round.
    Uh, no. Sorry. This is wrong. There are plenty of pizza ovens in Italy that are not round. Not sure why you think they're all round.

    Leave a comment:


  • mn8tr
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Thank you for this post, I was set to build a barrel vault mainly because it looked easier. I read this post just in time and was able to modify my plans to a round oven. THANKS !

    Leave a comment:


  • Baker
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Wow I had no idea! Very interesting

    Leave a comment:


  • Spunkoid
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    You may find that the steel warps over time with the high heat. Back in the day, they used cast material for stove tops to avoid that. The shape of the dome makes it more efficient than a rectangle or other shaped oven.
    On the other hand, there are lots of rectangle shaped ovens out there. My grandfather had built a clay oven for my Grandmother on their homestead. It was made in part from an old 1/2 culvert that was covered with mud and straw and vented out the back at the top of the oven. It had a clay floor and a wooden door that they put in place once the oven was fired and they had scraped the coals to the back of the oven.. It may not have been the most efficient design but she knew how to fire that oven to the right temperature to cook what ever she wanted.

    Rick

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  • fxpose
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Domed walls will give you better convection.

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  • sacwoodpusher
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    I guess my point was, why go to the trouble of making the pizza oven domed....Can't I just built the round walls to a height of, say 16 inches, and then lay a flat piece of steell across, stack bricks on top of it, and then insulate?

    Leave a comment:


  • Spunkoid
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    So what...? A low dome makes a big difference.
    Keep the dome low... a big part of the cooking process comes from heat that radiates down from the hot bricks. My dome is 1 meter in diameter, I added a 1/2 brick soldier course when I built the dome. When I cook, I have lots of room in the dome but sometimes feel that it is a little high and would have gotten better heat if the dome were lower. It is not really a problem as I keep a nice little fire burning on the side that keeps the heat up. But with hindsight, I would forgo the soldier course, kept the dome a little lower, and still would have had lots of height.

    Leave a comment:


  • sacwoodpusher
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    I guess I am at a bit of a loss.....I read that dry stacking bricks without mortar is good, and that ovens should be round.

    However, aside from the "purist viewpoint" of using only masonary materials, what is wrong with just drystacking bricks to form the walls and door, and then using a piece of heavy steel plate with bricks just laid on top to form the top of the oven and the top of the door.

    Once insulated and covered, the stacked bricks won't go anywhere, and the the steel will last a long, long time.

    So the oven will be a little higher around the outside walls, but so what?

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  • Spunkoid
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Excellent clarification.

    Thanks,

    Rick

    Leave a comment:


  • Wood fired oven workshops
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Hi Spunkoid,

    I agree that it is not uncommon to find old red [terra cotta] bricks starting to disintergrate but they are usually soft fired [under 1000 degrees centigrade] and are often subject to corrosive water.
    Modern bricks are usually hard fired and will last much longer.
    Oddly, I am presently in Red Deer, Alberta, on my first visit to Canada, running a wood fired oven workshop.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spunkoid
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Interestingly enough, I was up in Dawson City, in the Yukon Territory recently.
    Across the river from Dawson City is a "Paddle Wheeler Graveyard", a place where they parked all the old paddle wheelers and left them to rot after the road came in and river travel was no longer needed.
    They burnt wood for making steam to drive the boats and would stop frequently along the river between Whitehorse and Dawson city to resupply. The wood structures are well rotting away but the old boilers are still intact. I looked inside a couple of them and they were lined with old standard red brick.
    Last winter in Mexico, I found a forno that some construction workers built to cook their meals in. Red brick coated with clay and straw. Bottom line, you can use red brick but it does not last as long although it may last a lifetime if you are only cooking with it a couple times a week....

    Leave a comment:


  • Wood fired oven workshops
    replied
    Re: Why Italian Wood-Fired Ovens are Round

    Hi Tscarborough,

    I must admit the solid, pressed, common bricks are becoming, decidedly, less common in Australia as most brick manufacturers are turning to extruded bricks with as much 'holes' as there is fired clay [not a brick to be considered for oven dome construction].
    Certainly if your fire bricks are about the same price as commons there is no question which you should choose. It is only on the, usual, great price variation that you would choose common bricks.
    I have found that in assessing the quality of fire bricks in Australia, and from other parts of the world, that there can be enormous differences. What might be termed a common brick from one manufacturer can be more refractory than a fire brick from another.
    Our own [Aussie] firebrick manufacturers are meeting so much competition from imported Chinese manufacturers that there are very few local products left and it must be admitted that the imported product is, in general, far superior.
    I had an experience recently of purchasing, in the state of Tasmania, near-white house bricks [@$1each] to build an oven dome, that proved to be admirably suited to the job. The manufacturer told me he had been asked earlier for firebricks by a potential oven builder, who was referring to a 'build your own' wood fired oven book.
    When he said there were no firebrick manufacturers, as such, in Tasmania he offered him the same bricks as I had chosen saying they would be perfectly suitable for the oven temperatures he was likely to reach.
    The oven builder would have none of the suggestion stressing that the 'book' was perfectly clear - firebricks were to be used.
    He asked the brick manufacturer where he might purchase 'pure' firebricks and was advised to go to a barbeque shop- one of a large national chain.
    He eventually was able to obtain his firebricks - they were imported [across Bass Strait] from the Australian mainland @ $8 per brick!!!

    Leave a comment:

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