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Insulation Efficiency

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  • Re: Insulation Efficiency

    Originally posted by Gulf View Post
    Installing under fire brick for sure. I have seen references to FB board, ceramic fiber board, etc. I just wasn't sure if calcium silicate was appropriate for insulating the floor. I'm glad to find out that it is. I'll proceed and install it on top of the vermicrete.
    You will have one of the best insulated oven floors on the forum! Your plan is as close to perfect as you get. The CalSil board is about the best insulator you can get for directly under the floor bricks. You won't regret it.
    Ken H. - Kentucky
    42" Pompeii

    Pompeii Oven Construction Video Updated!

    Oven Thread ... Enclosure Thread
    Cost Spreadsheet ... Picasa Web Album

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    • Re: Insulation Efficiency

      Originally posted by Ken524 View Post
      You will have one of the best insulated oven floors on the forum! Your plan is as close to perfect as you get. The CalSil board is about the best insulator you can get for directly under the floor bricks. You won't regret it.
      WOW!, thanks very much for the vote of confidence.

      I went back and read your thread again. I will definately take every precaution to keep the CalSil as dry as possible.
      Joe Watson " A year from now, you will wish that you had started today" My Build Album / My Build

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      • Re: Insulation Efficiency

        You should be fine with CalSil. The stuff I used was a different animal (I wish I had used CalSil ).
        Ken H. - Kentucky
        42" Pompeii

        Pompeii Oven Construction Video Updated!

        Oven Thread ... Enclosure Thread
        Cost Spreadsheet ... Picasa Web Album

        Comment


        • Re: Insulation Efficiency

          Guys what is this? R=m2.K/W Resistance(s) to heat flow ?
          But main question.. do you know what numbers should be for good hearth insulation?

          I'm building this - http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/4...guy-16753.html
          and using alternative materials.

          Thanks

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          • Re: Insulation Efficiency

            I was going to use a locally-sourced 1" cal-sil board to spread the load, on top of 3" Foamglas for both more insulation and to prevent water wicking up from the base. The Foamglas is an absolute barrier to ground water, but it's really friable, even though it's rated for 90 psi. compressive load. Without the cal-sil, I think a brick dropped during construction would go halfway through to the hearth slab! I ended up with 3" cal-sil and 3" Foamglas (gross overkill, but I *really* wanted the Foamglas underneath).

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            • Re: Insulation Efficiency

              Originally posted by vtsteve View Post
              to prevent water wicking up from the base.
              Thats an issue that you should address before you continue with your build.
              You dont want water near the oven.
              The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

              My Build.

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              • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                at least like this

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                • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                  Originally posted by vtsteve View Post
                  I was going to use a locally-sourced 1" cal-sil board to spread the load, on top of 3" Foamglas for both more insulation and to prevent water wicking up from the base. The Foamglas is an absolute barrier to ground water, but it's really friable, even though it's rated for 90 psi. compressive load. Without the cal-sil, I think a brick dropped during construction would go halfway through to the hearth slab! I ended up with 3" cal-sil and 3" Foamglas (gross overkill, but I *really* wanted the Foamglas underneath).
                  A lot of people worry about water and cal.Sil. I know that you can soak cal.Sil in a bucket for a week and it still wont degrade, just drys out and is as rigid as ever.

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                  • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                    Originally posted by alex.g View Post
                    at least like this
                    The way you have it there is no adhesion between the blocks and the concrete due to the rubber matting, plus when it rains the water will sit on the rubber matting and travel up the blockwork into the oven.
                    I can see in the pic that moisture is already travelling up the blockwork.

                    Any dampcourse should be well above ground level to stop this from happening..
                    The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                    My Build.

                    Books.

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                    • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                      Originally posted by brickie in oz View Post
                      Any dampcourse should be well above ground level to stop this from happening..
                      I don't see any mentions of "dampcourse" here within the past year or two. It sounds like a *good thing* for those of us in wetter climates. Would you care to elaborate for us amateur masons? Maybe it merits a mention in the 3.0 plans... My slab rests on three feet of 3/4" stone, but my base still gets damp when the snow melts (not my dome, though).

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                      • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                        Originally posted by vtsteve View Post
                        It sounds like a *good thing* for those of us in wetter climates. .
                        Not only for the wetter climates but for anywhere, even dry climates need a dampcourse, DPC.
                        Damp or moisture will climb and masonry structure so an impervious barrier need to be incorporated in to the masonry.

                        The rule of thumb is taken that rain will hit a hard surface and bounce about 100mm high, so the DPC needs to be set more than 100mm from the hard surface to stop moisture penetration up into the structure.

                        If the DPC is set too low it will be ineffective.
                        The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                        My Build.

                        Books.

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                        • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                          Ahh... I see, it involves drilling a continuous series of holes in the masonry and filling them with a silicone fluid, which permeates the masonry and forms a water barrier. It seems to be a UK/Oz technique.

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                          • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                            Originally posted by vtsteve View Post
                            Ahh... I see, it involves drilling a continuous series of holes in the masonry and filling them with a silicone fluid,
                            No, it involves putting a barrier in place as you lay the blocks.
                            Like this.




                            The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                            My Build.

                            Books.

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                            • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                              Thanks for the pictures - I guess Google was just showing me the repair/retrofit version. So, for the usual filled-core stand, you'd have to put down at least one course (~200mm) of block, fill and rebar the cores, put the membrane down (with the rebar punched through and possibly sealed), and add courses to reach your finish height. Have I got it right?

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                              • Re: Insulation Efficiency

                                Cement rich concrete should by itself be waterproof, you can also add a chemical waterproofing agent to the concrete which would probably be a better option.

                                My first suggestion was more for brickwork.
                                The English language was invented by people who couldnt spell.

                                My Build.

                                Books.

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