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Oven floor brick cuts

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  • #16
    Are you going to add rebar in your pour?
    The corner braces you have may make it hard to float/smooth your pour. You might want to add braces from your sides to the ground. Wet concrete weighs a lot and you do not want to have your form blow out.
    Good luck this weekend.

    David

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    • #17
      thanks David, yes, i plan on removing the corner braces and using rebar and adding more support from the sides. with a 1 year old, time is limited, i framed it out two weeks ago and havent had a chance to pour it yet, so i put the corner braces on it just to make sure it stays put for the time in between.

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      • #18
        I also used the durock and just used some 2x4's as suport. I put them together with a kreg pocket hole jig. If you don't have one they are great. Then after it had cured for a few weeks I took it out with a hammer and pry bar. I was not worried about cracking the slab as it is about 6" thick. And the durock held the weight just fine.

        Randy

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        • #19
          One of the great things about the cement board is it does not have to be removed, and for my size hearth, the 5' length fit very well and really minimized the amount of cutting and supporting I had to do.
          My build thread
          http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

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          • #20
            what did you durok guys use to seal the seams in between boards? i've mapped it out where i will use 3 full pieces. and when cut, there will be 4 sections that make up the floor.

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            • #21
              I used hardibacker, which has very straight/flat edges (not sure about durok). The first full sheet spanned my cinderblocks with about 2" overlap, which left the cores open for a good bond. I didn't do anything to seal the edges where the board touched the blocks. For the internal seams, I just butted them up tight like shown in the picture, then placed 2x4 supports underneath centered on and running along the seam. I braced along each 2x4 with a couple of uprights, then added another support in the center of the full board for "just in case. When I pulled the supports I had virtually no leakage along the seams and they appeared to be well bonded. In fact I had very little leakage along the outside edge even though I didn't even use tape or try to seal the edge, other than strapping the boards tight all the way around (as shown in my post above).
              My build thread
              http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

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              • #22
                Originally posted by RandyJ View Post
                I also used the durock and just used some 2x4's as suport. I put them together with a kreg pocket hole jig. If you don't have one they are great. Then after it had cured for a few weeks I took it out with a hammer and pry bar. I was not worried about cracking the slab as it is about 6" thick. And the durock held the weight just fine.

                Randy
                Hey Randy, just curious - why did you use cement board if you were planning on removing it?
                My build thread
                http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
                  Either work, but with backer board, you can incorporate in pour and leave. You do need to make sure you temp. support underneath.
                  I used 1/2" that overlap the wall but not covered up the cell completely so I could grout.

                  [ATTACH=CONFIG]n381369[/ATTACH]

                  So if I understand the hardibacker. Is the difference between plywood and backer that you don't need to have the hardibacker sheets a half inch below the level of the top layer of cement blocks? In other words, you can just span the width of the stand by supporting underneath? In this configuration I see that the backer is not counter sunk but sitting on top of the stand and extending over the inner edge of cement blocks by a few inches.

                  Mike

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