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  • Fire brick identification

    I have a large amount of firebrick I got from a friend that got them from a job site left over from a large industrial glass kiln. The bricks have never been used.
    I have read that there are bricks out there that are meant to never cool down, or they will break. How would one go about identifying such a brick?

  • #2
    Coming from an industrial glass kiln that most likely these bricks will be "super" duty and are very hard to cut and you will go through a lot of blades. I used super duty on my build, they were surplus from a steel mill which I suspect never cooled down either. I have never had a brick crack from thermal cycles.. They are very high in alumina (60%) which contributes to the hardness of the brick. Test cut a brick on a wet saw and if slow cutting they are super duty. Need to weigh the cost of regular fire bricks vs super duty vs blade cost. That said, I went for a super tight mortar joint on all faces, hence lots of cuts/blades. If I were to do this again I would focus on tight joints on the interior of the dome only and let mortar be my friend on the other parts of the brick joints.
    Last edited by UtahBeehiver; 01-24-2016, 03:32 PM.
    Russell
    Build Link............... Picassa Photo Album Link

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    • #3
      And use low duty for the floor.

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      • #4
        I also used a combination of high and super duty to build my dome. I did not go for super tight joints through out. Just tight on the inside. I went through 2 rigid brand segmented blades at 65 $ each. I did use low duty on the floor. Everything is holding up nicely so far. If you can get a deal on the bricks I say use them.

        Randy

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        • #5
          Make sure you use dense firebricks not insulating firebricks. If they're really light they are IFB's. Dense firebricks are a similar density to solid house bricks.
          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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          • #6
            Yes I believe that a 2.5"x4.5"x9" brick is in the 7.5# range depending on brand and duty rating.

            Randy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
              Coming from an industrial glass kiln that most likely these bricks will be "super" duty and are very hard to cut and you will go through a lot of blades. I used super duty on my build, they were surplus from a steel mill which I suspect never cooled down either. I have never had a brick crack from thermal cycles.. They are very high in alumina (60%) which contributes to the hardness of the brick. Test cut a brick on a wet saw and if slow cutting they are super duty. Need to weigh the cost of regular fire bricks vs super duty vs blade cost. That said, I went for a super tight mortar joint on all faces, hence lots of cuts/blades. If I were to do this again I would focus on tight joints on the interior of the dome only and let mortar be my friend on the other parts of the brick joints.
              I too went through two blades on the Forno Bravo bricks that I bought. I believe they are medium duty. They cut well but we're not easy to cut. Not light either. Middle of the road is what I would say they were.
              I also went for tight mortarless inner joints with plenty of mortar on the outside or inside. I used a mortar bag to squirt mortar into all the joints. I have had zero problems and the whole oven is very solid.

              The only change that I would make would be to insulate the floor a bit more. I have 2 inch fiber board as my floor insulation and I would say that I am worried more about cooking the top of my pie rather than the bottom. I will burn the bottom if not paying attention.
              Darin I often cook with wine, sometimes I even add it to the food... WC Fields Link to my build http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/4...-ca-20497.html My Picasa Pics https://picasaweb.google.com/1121076...eat=directlink

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              • #8
                I am pretty sure they use Whitacre-Greer which are low duty.

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