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Mobile Oven Dome in MIchigan

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    Just refreshing the question in my prior post about using a clay flue. Anyone have any thoughts?

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    One issue I am having is my chimney...I am using a 8x8 clay flue (I like the look). It is removable so I can store it when I travel. However, the flue is cracking. I believe this is because of the temp variance between the inside of the flue and the outside...especially on cool nights. Has anyone ever insulated the flue in a way that was attractive? Could I get way with using a flue blanket just until it warmed up and then leave it bare after heating the oven? Thanks for any thoughts.

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    I finished my oven in August and have been burning cooking fires to dry out the render before I do my final coat which I think is going to be paint but could possibly be a colored, watered down product that David has talked about that can be brushed on.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Held trowel until pcrete would not fall away, less than 60 seconds if I recall but I did not do 8" thickness, more like 3" so I cannot say how long 8" will take but you will need to do it in vertical lifts so it does not collapse vertically as well. 8 to 1 is what I used but can't say how pumice will affect workability or insulation factor.

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  • Alomran
    replied
    Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
    I made a simple curved trowel to set my pcrete which I used 8 to 1 doing the layers in 4" lifts.
    Hi Utahbeehiver,
    Thank you for the great info you contribute to this great forum.
    How long did you hold the curved trowel to set my pcrete?
    Also, I am planning to have a 8" pcrete ( approx. 20cm), Is that doable with the 8 to 1?
    My pcrete is going to be vermiculite mixed with large pumice stone, do you think 8:1 is workable?

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    I have 2” of blanket insulation and 2” vermiculite at 10:1 ratio. Can I just start cooking fires to dry the vermiculite prior to applying the stucco?

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    Thanks Russell. I’ll give that a shot.

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    Finished my curing fires today. After reading tons of posts on curing methods and timing I decided on the following.

    Day 1 - two chaffing dish fuels for 6 hours - high temp 120 F
    Day 2 - four chaffing dish fuels for 6 hours - high temp 200 F
    Day 3 - turkey fryer burner on very low for 8 hours - high temp 300F
    Day 4 - turkey burner on med for 8 hours - high temp 500 F
    Day 5 - wood fire for 6 hours - high temp 700 F
    Day 6 - wood fire for 5 hours - high temp 1,000 F

    This seems to have worked pretty good. I plan to do a cooking fire tomorrow....

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I made a simple curved trowel to set my pcrete which I used 8 to 1 doing the layers in 4" lifts.

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    Thanks David.... very helpful!

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  • david s
    replied
    1. The leaner you make it the less workable it becomes. I find 10:1 about as lean as you can go. If you add a handful of powdered clay for every litre of cement it will assist in making it more workable. The correct water addition is essential. For every 10 parts vermiculite add 3 parts water. I find it best to apply by hand (wear gloves), but use the flat of the trowel to tap gently the surface flat once you’ve finished.
    2. Course is less workable than fine, but fine requires more water. So a good compromise is medium grade.
    3. You will be convinced that it will be inadequate, but it dries nice and firm and makes a good substrate to stucco on to.
    4. Work out the volume of the layer using 4/3 Pi x r3. Subtract inner volume from outer volume and divide by 2 because it’s a hemisphere. You will get approx 20% reduction in volume of vermicrete when you add cement and water to the vermiculite.

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    I plan to put a couple of inches of vermiculite over my blanket insulation. I understand the formula is 10 parts Vermiculie, 1 part Portland cement and water.

    1). Will this proctuct be workable to apply and shape with a trowel?
    2). I plan to get my Vermiculite from Uline....they have different sizes going from fine to course (see picture attached). I am guessing I should use the course as I would think it would have the best insulating properties?
    3). Will this give me a good rough finish that I can apply the stucco to or do I need to rake it or apply lath before the stucco layers?
    4) Any suggestions on how I estimate how much vermiculite I will need? Dome is 49” outside diameter plus 2” of blanket to total outside diameter is about 53”. It is sold in 4 cu ft bags.

    Thanks everyone!

    -Steve

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  • david s
    replied
    At 400 C the thermal expansion is in the region of 0.3%, so for a 1.0 m (36”) oven that’s 3mm (1/8”)

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    I would like to put a thermal break between my dome cast and the landing. I plan to put a piece of cardboard between the two when I pour my landing cast. How wide does this gap need to be? 1/16 or 1/8 inch?

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  • szv9n5
    replied
    I built my sand form today for my 44” dome. I had trouble with it because of repeated collapses. I finally built it in layers of about 7” each and between each layer I laid a sheet of window screen. This worked perfectly. Just sharing In case anyone has this problem....

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