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First Timer's AZ Build

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  • Phxdt
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Well, I ended up making Father's Day weekend my time to pour the hearth. I rented the largest concrete mixer I could find ( 9 cubic feet capacity), so I only needed to mix two batches. I used a plywood support with no backer board in the end. I had it purchased, and took it back.


    For someone who has precious little experience pouring concrete, it turned out very well. I am going to focus on bricking up the facade while it cures to max strength. Progress photos below of my saturday pour.

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  • azatty
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    If I were to do it again, I would probably use backer board and leave it. The oven fairies poured my slab while I was out of town, and didn't give much thought to how to remove the supporting wood. So I ended up having to cut out 1" plywood with a jigsaw AFTER the piece fell down from the bottom of the slab a year later.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Azatty,

    Given any thought of using Durock or Handiboard and just leaving in the pour. I used this type of material in my hearth pour and it makes a clean interior. They show it as an option in the Pompelli Plans.

    Russell

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  • azatty
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Originally posted by Phxdt View Post
    I am using a 5/8 inch particle board that is one solid piece (well one piece that I will rip down the center so that I can remove once the hearth is poured). Keeping a 3/8 gap between frame and blocks as suggested.
    I don't know how well particle board will hold up (that's the stuff cheap bookcases are made of). It's not a structural product and it doesn't do well when it gets wet. Now if you mean OSB (oriented strand board) used for sheathing, that's fine.
    Last edited by azatty; 06-13-2012, 06:53 AM.

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  • Mike D
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    The shims go on the bottom of the supports, on the floor. Easier to remove

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  • Mike D
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    -The Shims are to help remove the supports after you pour. If they are perfectly cut and put in there it's too hard to pull them out. The shims give you a little wiggle room.

    -I would overbuild every support for the pour. Look at other builds, You can't stop moving cement.

    Good Luck

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  • deejayoh
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    [QUOTE=Phxdt;132154]I finally finished up the lentil construction - see pics below. As you can see with the second picture, the angle iron was exposed to the inside, rather than the outside face. I wanted to have as clean a face as possible for the brick veneer.QUOTE]

    I think FB plans call for the lintel (not the bean ) to have angle iron front and back. I'm not sure you will have enough support for the slab with the angle iron on only one side of your lintel.

    If you are concerned about having the brick facing be flush to the lintel then grind the front of the block back a bit so it can be recessed

    I will say that all the messy grinding + the cost of the angle iron was the reason I chose to pour my lintel with the slab.

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  • Phxdt
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Working on my wooden stand for the hearth pour a couple of nights ago.

    Not sure if the shims recommended are for the base of the 2x4s to level out (my assumption), or for when you place the plywood on top of the 2x4 frame.

    I am using a 5/8 inch particle board that is one solid piece (well one piece that I will rip down the center so that I can remove once the hearth is poured). Keeping a 3/8 gap between frame and blocks as suggested.

    Leave a comment:


  • Phxdt
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    I finally finished up the lentil construction - see pics below. As you can see with the second picture, the angle iron was exposed to the inside, rather than the outside face. I wanted to have as clean a face as possible for the brick veneer.

    Next step is researching the hearth design and pour. Considering a slot for the ash, but not going to do it- most say that it isn't needed. Anyone have strong opinions on the subject?

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  • azatty
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Now, if you mean how to set the veneer brick across the open span, that's another question. You can make another arch, or put a support over the span and mortar the bricks to the block and adjacent bricks, or make something more complicated like a basketweave or other design. I'd probably gonwith the flatter arches.

    Leave a comment:


  • azatty
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Angle iron is the bridge over the open span. Face the angles inward, and the iron holds the brick nicely. No need for rebar through the lentel.

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  • Laku
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    You could do it as straight/dutch/french arch. Like here

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  • Phxdt
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Also, how do you float brick over the face of the lentil (planning on covering all block with brick mocked up in bottom left of photo of previous post)? there is nothing for it to rest on. I am sure this is a common issue, but just realized this today.

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  • Phxdt
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Ok, finally properly grinded the blocks. But now, I am considering how to set them into place (see pic below). The lentil isn't tied to anything, just set in place. My options:

    1. Fill every other core with concrete, and know that the hearth with keep them in place

    2. Drill a hole in the angle iron and run rebar through it. Fill coes with concrete.

    3. Run a rebar through all four of the blocks by either drilling a hole through all, or creating a channel. Then filling all cores with concrete.


    Each idea has its merits. Thoughts?

    Leave a comment:


  • Neil2
    replied
    Re: First Timer's AZ Build

    Everyone should have an angle grinder in their tool box. Amazing the uses you will find for it from grinding, polishing to cutting up rebar.

    I would opt for a 5 inch grinder over the inexpensive 4 inch ones. They will use both the 5 inch disks and 4 inch disks and are generally much more robust.
    Last edited by Neil2; 05-22-2012, 08:13 AM.

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