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36" Pompeii low-dome in Livermore, CA

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  • #31
    Very interesting build to watch, Not many low domes have been documented on the FB forum so this is nice to see.
    Russell
    Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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    • #32
      Very cool build. It is amazing how many different ways there are to cut the bricks. Your jig is very cool. It looks way more user friendly than the brick shims that I used. Mine was useable but yours is repeatable. Great job. I look forward to seeing your next update.

      Randy

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      • #33
        Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
        Very interesting build to watch, Not many low domes have been documented on the FB forum so this is nice to see.
        Thanks! Nice to hear it's appreciated.

        Originally posted by RandyJ View Post
        Very cool build. It is amazing how many different ways there are to cut the bricks. Your jig is very cool. It looks way more user friendly than the brick shims that I used. Mine was useable but yours is repeatable. Great job. I look forward to seeing your next update.

        Randy
        Thanks Randy. For future reference, I figured out later the easy way to make 2-axis cuts and have all the slopes go the right direction would have been to build a 2nd jig, mirror image of the first, and make the complementary cuts on the opposite side of the blade. It doesn't apply to me because as of yesterday evening, my dome is closed up!

        I'm thinking it's safe to pull out the sand today? If there's any bad mortar on the inside faces of the bricks, I want to get it cleaned up before it gets too stiff.

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        • #34
          You are really moving along fast. Good idea to tackle the inside mortar before it sets up too hard.
          Russell
          Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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          • #35
            So here it is! There are some gaps on the inside which could use some tuck-pointing. Any advice on how long to wait to cure?

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Larry P View Post
              So here it is! There are some gaps on the inside which could use some tuck-pointing. Any advice on how long to wait to cure?
              That depends on what kind of cement you used in your mortar.If it's calcium aluminate curing is done in 24 hrs if calcium silicate a min of one week. If you used home brew the lime in it slows down the cure so leave it a min 10 days.
              Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by david s View Post

                That depends on what kind of cement you used in your mortar.If it's calcium aluminate curing is done in 24 hrs if calcium silicate a min of one week. If you used home brew the lime in it slows down the cure so leave it a min 10 days.
                Thanks David, that helps. I used Heat Stop 50 which I believe is calcium aluminate. The instructions say way 24 hours, but I can be patient. I will probably be constructing my entry arch on Sunday so it's likely I don't start a fire until the following weekend.

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                • #38
                  Yes I believe the Heatstop 50 is a calcium aluminate bases mortar. It reaches full strength in 24 hrs. The chemistry is different to Portland (calcium silicate) cement which gets stronger over a longer period, up to 100 years apparently, although I think that would be overkill for curing period. Three days achieves 80% of the benefit of water curing for a week.
                  Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                  • #39
                    A bit of a slow weekend for me, but I did get my door done. Basically it's a 3.5" clamshell, with 2 layers of 2" ceramic fiber board inside to insulate. The gap is filled with 1/2" ceramic rope. 2 1/2"x4" bolts hold it together, and they are the only conductivity to the front plate. It's a little heavy, but workable. I need to figure out how to keep the rope from fraying at the end. I foresee that being a problem down the road.

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                    • #40
                      I built the form for my entry arch and started cutting the bricks, which is a whole lot of no fun. 8 cuts to taper a full brick. I only got 9/24 done, but I'm getting the hang of it so it's speeding up. I think I will start curing fires tomorrow, and let them burn while I'm cutting.

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                      • #41
                        It will be worth it, nice even mortar joints and consistent tapered bricks. Big door, it will surely hold the heat, how much does it weigh?
                        Russell
                        Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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                        • #42
                          The door is... I didn't weigh the door. Let me just say, my wife will have some negative comments but I'm pretty sure she can lift it

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                          • #43
                            Gotta keep the SWMBO happy.........if mamma ain't happy nobody is happy.
                            Russell
                            Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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                            • #44
                              Larry, nice looking door! Did you fab it yourself, or hire it out?
                              My build thread
                              http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by JRPizza View Post
                                Larry, nice looking door! Did you fab it yourself, or hire it out?
                                I hired it out. One that that's not in my repertoire is welding. I'm really regretting it too. Probably take a welding class at the local community college after this is over, but didn't think about it until too late.

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