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A new Folly at Full Moon Farm-- build thread

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  • Chach
    replied
    Originally posted by SandySpringsPizza View Post
    Thanks for the fast reply. I am going to use structural steel, not stuff for drywall. I did forget that I"m not hanging the stones on the frame, just stacking against it.

    Thanks,
    Hi Mark,

    I throw my 2 cents in. I used structural steel studs 18g . Very very strong stuff. I purchased mine from a contractor supply house and it was pretty reasonable. I paid less than $200 for all the framing I needed. The place I purchased mine from sold it by the foot so it didnt matter how long of a piece I purchased as it was priced by the foot and I could buy 1 or 1000 no minimum quantity needed. There is a store called Menards similar to a home depot by me but they are not by Georgia. They also sold them by the 10 pack. You can check the pro desk at depot and see if they can special order them for you. Thats what i did at Menards but also needed a piece and went to the supply house after the fact. If you get charged by the pice and you know what size you need for your walls and roof it might make sense to buy a longer stud and if it works out cheaper and you get more usable pieces out of it. if you needed 3 foot pieces and they have 8 footers see how much a 12 footer is it would give you twice the pieces but cheaper than two 8 footers and have lottle to no waste. Hope this helps.

    Ricky

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  • SandySpringsPizza
    replied
    Thanks for the fast reply. I am going to use structural steel, not stuff for drywall. I did forget that I"m not hanging the stones on the frame, just stacking against it.

    Thanks,

    Leave a comment:


  • rwiegand
    replied
    Originally posted by SandySpringsPizza View Post
    Great thread. Very helpful. Did you find that 18 gauge was strong enough? I want to enclose my oven with a dog house like rwiegand using faux stone. Will 18 ga. support it?
    Yes, 18 would support almost anything. I think that I ended up using 20 or 22 ga-- I can't remember and I didn't find it in a quick perusal of my own thread. Going up to the really heavy ones would have cost about 5x as much, and I was assured by the guys at the lumber yard completely unnecessary. I did space them 12" OC in a sprit of overbuilding. No sagging yet (actually no detectable deflection), and it has had several feet of snow on it, as well as my full weight on multiple occasions.

    The stone veneer puts very little weight on the frame-- the frame just holds it vertical and it the weight is supported at the base. The roof (and any snow load) is what might stress the framing. The slate and plywood, while heavy, doesn't require exceptional framing. Because I wanted to keep the structure as short as reasonable I didn't have the equivalent of ceiling joists to hold the walls together at the top of the wall. I substituted with beefy collar ties as low as I could place them over the dome. (Weight on the roof will tend to push the walls outward) So far so good!

    Short answer is that any structurally rated stud should be fine. Just avoid the lightweight ones from the Borg.

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  • SandySpringsPizza
    replied
    Great thread. Very helpful. Did you find that 18 gauge was strong enough? I want to enclose my oven with a dog house like rwiegand using faux stone. Will 18 ga. support it?

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  • cbailey
    replied
    Beautiful job! It will bring joy to you, your family and guests for years. Well done.

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  • Chach
    replied
    Looks amazing...it's those little finishing touches that makes a project pop and you achieved that for sure.

    Ricky

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  • fox
    replied
    Fantastic well done....

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Congrats on finishing the oven. Nice looking oven.

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  • rwiegand
    replied
    It's done!! At long last I've completed the last step (well, not counting making a proper door). The top of my chimney looked insubstantial and unfinished to me with just a stainless steel pan up there, so I had a piece of granite made to top off the chimney. This weekend we rented a Genie lift to hoist it into place and today it was warm enough to finish the installation. I made a flashing out of lead sheet, pounding it into shape around a form I made and today fixed everything in place using a Sikaflex adhesive. The flashing goes around the chimney pipe and then about 4" out onto the granite.

    We're using the oven about once a week, even when it's snowing. Great addition to our social lives, people ask when they can come over for pizza!

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  • purplehaze
    replied
    Impressive build, nice work.

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  • Chach
    replied
    Very Nice work....i have been working a ton of overtime and havent touched mine since june...i am going to start up again in a week and close it up before winter.

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  • 7caesers
    replied
    That is really sharp! Beautiful work!

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  • rwiegand
    replied
    It's almost complete, I'm going to replace the little metal chimney cap with a piece of granite I've had cut to give the top of the chimney a more finished look. I just need to free up my truck to go get a lift from the rental place to get the 100 lb piece up 15 ft. Other than that it is done. We use it at least once a week. Works like a champ.

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  • 7caesers
    replied
    My build is quite similar to yours. I would really like to see your finished product. Please post a picture when you have time.

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  • 7caesers
    replied
    The peel and stick flashing is an option. I will have to give that some consideration.

    Leave a comment:

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