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Simmental Farm 36" Pompeii and 48" Rumford Style Fireplace

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  • Chach
    replied
    Originally posted by Gulf View Post
    Married with a wooden brick this creates a no offset pivot point.

    Don drilled a 5/8" hole and a slight 3/4" counter sink hole underneath in my old wooden brick at the exact center of the dome floor. We had to rout a counter sink in the top to allow free swing of the IT for the first course and scribing the floor brick.

    The exact center point is easy to find for the rough placement of the wooden brick before cutting to find where the wooden brick needs to lie with the full scale template. For the final placement it is easy to mark the direct center on the wooden brick with the center point hole provided in the template. Just line the template up with the center line marks front and back on the concrete hearth.
    That sweet. I pretty much made the same thing with a fork bolt. I put the threade part in my wood brick and used square stock for the IT and welded a nut at the end and used all thread to secure my unistrut L bracket to the square stock. Very Nice.

    Ricky

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  • MarkJerling
    replied
    Originally posted by Gulf View Post
    Edit: to replace post 26

    Another dry stack after cutting. We placed the ID and OD tools in this pic for clarity. I hope this gives a little more perspective on a brick segmental arch.
    Very tidy Gulf. And great explanatory photos.

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  • david s
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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    Originally posted by Gulf View Post
    If all the ingredients are dry they can be premixed for later use. Don screened all his ingredients as he was as adding them to be dry mixed. I have found that a child sized garden hoe is just the right size for dry mixing the ingredients.

    It really helps to have an easy to make screening box that fits right over a project tub for this project. It's fitted with 1/4" wire mesh. A scrap of galvanized window screen is placed on top for the fine screening. I have used this setup also to process brick cuttings. We did some of that too, later in this build.
    I agree and use the sifter pictured. I get bulk graded sand for use in concrete, but dry sift out the coarse grains for mortar or render. My screen removes anything larger than 3mm. A range of grain sizes is actually preferable to a uniform size.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Either Ither, it looks great but I think you are right and it is called an "Axed" arch. Also you old boss has a great mentor and his second oven for his daughter will go up quickly.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    If all the ingredients are dry they can be premixed for later use. Don screened all his ingredients as he was as adding them to be dry mixed. I have found that a child sized garden hoe is just the right size for dry mixing the ingredients.

    It really helps to have an easy to make screening box that fits right over a project tub for this project. It's fitted with 1/4" wire mesh. A scrap of galvanized window screen is placed on top for the fine screening. I have used this setup also to process brick cuttings. We did some of that too, later in this build.

    Last edited by Gulf; 02-06-2022, 08:56 AM.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    That done, it was time to prepare the ingredients of the 3-1-1-1 homebrew.

    I'm not sure how many do this step, but IMO it is very important to screen all the ingredients. Bagged fire clay, sand, and fresh Portland cement will have some larger particles that can be better used for other purposes. Even hydrated lime can have some small clumps that are easier mixed if they are busted up through the screen before mixing. The large particles can make fitting the brick a little more difficult.

    The most important to screen is the sand. All masonry and general purpose sand that I have screened so far had small rocks. In some cases pea gravel and larger. I don't know if they will crack when heated but, I don't want them in my mortar.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Don kept the build organized. Each arch brick was marked and set aside until needed.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Edit: to replace post 26

    Another dry stack after cutting. We placed the ID and OD tools in this pic for clarity. I hope this gives a little more perspective on a brick segmental arch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gulf
    replied
    Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
    Great tapered inner arch on a "axe" arch.
    Thanks Russell,

    There can be some confusion on arch terms. Since I did not taper the vouissoirs, I'm not sure that it can be called an "axe" or "axed" arch?

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Great tapered inner arch on a "axe" arch.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Another dry stack after cutting. We placed the ID and OD tools in this pic for clarity. I hope this gives a little more perspective on a brick segmental arch.

    EDIT: Unable to restore original post with all the pics. See post # 29

    Last edited by Gulf; 02-06-2022, 06:47 AM.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    As each brick is removed from the dry stack, we connected both ID marks using the ID radius tool. Measuring up 1 1/2" ( for a reveal) from the underside mark we connected a line out to the OD mark. We used color coded permanent markers for this step to eliminate confusion at the wet saw. The markers also hold up to the water spray and don't disappear while cutting.

    That slope is not very much different than using the string method, but it makes a clean intersection both inside and outside the inner arch.
    Last edited by Gulf; 02-06-2022, 06:09 AM.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    However, the ID scribe takes a couple more steps to complete. The ID attachment is first used to scribe the inside of the arch. At some point down the risers it will run out of brick to mark and will then be used to mark the inside face of the inner arch brick. Again, at some point the ID tool will run out of the inside face to mark. From there that point is scribed down to the intersection of the floor brick using a radius tool. In this case we made a quick ID radius on a piece of card board to transfer that mark. I know that last step is clear as mud, but I will try to stage another pic later and add it to this post.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    The arch was scribed ID and OD completely while dry stacked with the scribing tools. We didn't get pics during that process, but this pic was staged to show how the OD tool reaches around the uncut brick to get a 22" OD mark for a 36" dome. The OD is fairly easy as it is just one mark on the outside of the arch.
    Last edited by Gulf; 02-05-2022, 06:28 PM.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    With the arch brick dry stacked we started scribing the arch with the ID and OD tools. We discovered that the arch was placed too far forward.

    On the drawing, I had plotted the first riser and the top dead center arch bricks. That works well for a hemispherical arch, but this is a segmental arch. On a segmental arch the top risers and springers (skew back) protrude furthest into the dome away from the face of the arch. I went back to the template later to see how that could have been predicted. The third pic shows that adding the height of the risers to the inside face of the first riser places it outside of the ID of the dome.

    We moved the face of the arch in to 19" from the center of the dome. That move gives Don a slightly deep entry. He's okay with that since he wants to use that area for grilling steaks.

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