Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tuck pointing fireplace with homebrew

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tuck pointing fireplace with homebrew

    I have a buddy who needs to do some pointing in his fireplace in his home. I was wondering if homebrew could be used or if he would be better of with a store bought fireplace mortar?
    - seth s.

    my build (in progress)

    Google Photo Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/k4JW8jut8cWxFpjM9

  • #2
    The homebrew would be just fine if you have enough of the ingredients to spare. Gathering up the bulk homebrew ingredients for such a small job makes the store bought a better option. Though, most of the store bought is only rated for very thin joints. I'm fixin to do the same thing on an old fireplace and will be using the homebrew. I'm going to have to replace a few brick also. I'm guessing that regular mortar was used on this job. The joints swelled and popped large chunks of the faces of several brick.
    Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
    My Build
    My Web Album

    Comment


    • #3
      I have all the ingredients sitting around (though I'm running low on portland) so I thought I'd just give him a dry mix that he can add water to when he gets it home.

      Next question: I had been using homebrew in place of regular mortar on my external stuff that doesn't need homebrew because I like / am used to the workability of it. I may run out of Portland soon but have a couple leftover bags of stucco base coat.. Can that be used in place of mortar?
      - seth s.

      my build (in progress)

      Google Photo Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/k4JW8jut8cWxFpjM9

      Comment


      • #4
        Beware of a high lime mix for decorative work as over time it can leach white residue down the face .

        Comment


        • #5
          I would take the stucco back and get a couple of bags of masonry cement.

          Edit: You will like regular mortars workabillity. There will be a color difference from what you have completed so far. But, you can get pretty close by adding some masonry coloring.
          Last edited by Gulf; 11-19-2019, 03:35 PM.
          Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
          My Build
          My Web Album

          Comment


          • #6
            Also, If you so choose, the 1 part Portland/1 part lime can be replaced with 2 parts masonry cement for the remainder of your decorative brick.
            Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
            My Build
            My Web Album

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Gulf View Post
              Also, If you so choose, the 1 part Portland/1 part lime can be replaced with 2 parts masonry cement for the remainder of your decorative brick.
              In the 3:1:1:1? So I could do 3:2:1 (sand : masonry cement : fire clay) to match what I've already been doing?

              When buying masonry cement does Type S vs Type N matter for this application? I would definitely rather buy a bag of masonry cement than another 80 lb bag of portland this close to the end of my build.
              - seth s.

              my build (in progress)

              Google Photo Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/k4JW8jut8cWxFpjM9

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, to the 3-2-1. It will probably more closely match what you already have started on the decorative brick.

                Type N would be best. The original recipe for type N is 50/50 Portland to lime. The lime in today's recipe has been mostly replaced with what the industry calls "or the equivalent". That is usually lime, crushed limestone, and some proprietary additives. There are very few, if any, small companies that will still bag the original formula.
                Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
                My Build
                My Web Album

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gulf View Post
                  Yes, to the 3-2-1. It will probably more closely match what you already have started on the decorative brick.

                  Type N would be best. The original recipe for type N is 50/50 Portland to lime. The lime in today's recipe has been mostly replaced with what the industry calls "or the equivalent". That is usually lime, crushed limestone, and some proprietary additives. There are very few, if any, small companies that will still bag the original formula.
                  Awesome, thanks!
                  - seth s.

                  my build (in progress)

                  Google Photo Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/k4JW8jut8cWxFpjM9

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Your welcome.

                    I just want to bring out for future builders that are in the planning stage and may be reading this thread that the Type-N masonry cement is not a substitute for the portland and lime in the homebrew. The "or the equivalent" for the hydrated lime in today's masonry cement is not refractory as is hydrated lime.

                    EDIT:
                    I would definitely rather buy a bag of masonry cement than another 80 lb bag of portland this close to the end of my build.
                    Are you sure that it was not a 94 lb bag?
                    Last edited by Gulf; 11-20-2019, 05:52 PM.
                    Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
                    My Build
                    My Web Album

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gulf View Post
                      Are you sure that it was not a 94 lb bag?
                      You are correct, it was a 94 lb bag.
                      - seth s.

                      my build (in progress)

                      Google Photo Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/k4JW8jut8cWxFpjM9

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That's great! I really did not mean to nitpick. But, over the years, there have been times when people have picked up the wrong product. The 80 lb portland (cement) just threw up a red flag for me. Bagged masonry products can get confusing to someone just starting out and may be reading this thread. I'm sure that you have a handle on this.
                        Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
                        My Build
                        My Web Album

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yeah, I had it in my head that it was 80 but I think that was the premixed bags of stucco that were 80. I was mostly just pointing out that it would be a lot of excess if I bought a whole new bag this late in the game!
                          - seth s.

                          my build (in progress)

                          Google Photo Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/k4JW8jut8cWxFpjM9

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X