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  • Help me pick between two designs

    I'm between two designs for my casa90. One would be a large enclosure. With stone veneer on the outside. With this design I will be able to angle my vent back inside the structure and then have it go up alongside my roof instead of through it.

    The second choice is an igloo with a chimney built up in the front. With this design my vent will go through my patio ceiling and roof.

    I'm wondering if the enclosure will offer better insulation since I can fill it with vermiculite? Or will I be able to insulate the igloo just as well? Both will have 3" of insulation blanket on top. Any other pros and cons or considerations that you can think of in helping me make my choice?
    Enclosure Igloo with chimney

  • #2
    I am a fan of enclosed ovens because you can add extra insulation, and I feel you are more well protected from the weather. So I say the 1st one.

    Randy

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    • #3
      Originally posted by terdferguson View Post
      I'm between two designs for my casa90. One would be a large enclosure. With stone veneer on the outside. With this design I will be able to angle my vent back inside the structure and then have it go up alongside my roof instead of through it.

      The second choice is an igloo with a chimney built up in the front. With this design my vent will go through my patio ceiling and roof.

      I'm wondering if the enclosure will offer better insulation since I can fill it with vermiculite? Or will I be able to insulate the igloo just as well? Both will have 3" of insulation blanket on top. Any other pros and cons or considerations that you can think of in helping me make my choice?
      Here's a solution for you. I've built a few like this Here are a couple.
      Click image for larger version

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      Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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      • #4
        Thanks David. That certainly would work, but my wife does not like to see a long length of exposed vent pipe. That's why in my igloo design I have a chimney built up in the front. She's ok with a little pipe coming out of the top but would like it kept to a minimum.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RandyJ View Post
          I am a fan of enclosed ovens because you can add extra insulation, and I feel you are more well protected from the weather. So I say the 1st one.

          Randy

          Why you got to do that to me Randy? I was really digging option 2 now you've thrown a wrench into the whole thing!

          In all seriousness, heat retention is really important to me. I'd like to be able to cook on subsequent days after pizza. If you guys think there will be a noticeable difference if I go with the igloo, then I'll scrap it. My problem with #1 is the thing is huge! It's so obtrusive. How about something in between the two.....I present to you....option 3 which features a much smaller enclosure around the dome:

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          • #6
            You need to choose which one works for you. In your case, the oven is under a patio so it should be protected. The amount of insulation you want can be achieved on an igloo as well as an enclosed structure. The only difference is you can pour dry perlite or vermiculite in the enclosure. It is not uncommon to get 4-5 days of workable heat from an oven and if you want more you can always recharge with a small fire. So the choice is yours and do what work best for your area, design, and budget.
            Russell
            Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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            • #7
              Originally posted by terdferguson View Post

              My problem with #1 is the thing is huge! It's so obtrusive. How about something in between the two.....I present to you....option 3 which features a much smaller enclosure around the dome:
              Option 3 sounds like it is the right option for you. But, I really like your brick rendered option 2. I personally, just like the look of an igloo .
              joe watson

              "A year from now, you will wish that you had started today "

              My Build
              My Picasa Web Album

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              • #8
                My oven is exposed. It sits under the edge of the patio roof so it will definitely get rained on. A lot (I live in Florida).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Gulf View Post

                  Option 3 sounds like it is the right option for you. But, I really like your brick rendered option 2. I personally, just like the look of an igloo .
                  I'm pickin up what you're puttin down. Option 2 looks fantastic. I love it. But I was just reading all the old threads I could about waterproofing igloos and that was enough to scare me away. I think it's got to be #3. Thanks guys.

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                  • #10
                    That was part of my thinking. I know there have been a number of people who have had a lot of trouble keeping water out. If it was totally covered that is one thing but if not a enclosure will do the trick. You don't have to make it huge to do the job. Nice and small to keep the wife happy is important. My wife was out of town when I framed mine up, and was like are you building a house back there it is huge. It doesn't look as big now that it is finnished. But remember it is your choice do what makes you happy.

                    Randy

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                    • #11
                      I had similar concerns about keeping water out, although I am under a roof like you are. Since I have a corner build, I decided to put up two walls that will stop most of the wind and rain that comes in from the SW. If I can keep the chimney penetration from leaking I won't have to worry about waterproofing. You may not be into walls, but it gives you some place to hang your tools
                      My build thread
                      http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

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                      • #12
                        Hey guys I have another question. If you take a look at the option 3 pic, you can see the back of the oven will be up against a fence. The outside of my oven will be finished with stone veneer as pictured. However, in order to save space and get my oven as far back towards the fence as possible, I'd like to NOT put stone veneer on that back side right up against the fence. That will free up a couple inches. If I do that, how would I properly finish that side of the oven so it's weatherproof?

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                        • #13
                          I'm guessing that this section of fence is not presently there, or that it can temporarily be removed. I would use galvalume roofing metal on the back side. If you notch your metal lathing to fit the studs, that is only about an inch of thickness. More, if you attach the face of fence directly to the lathing of the oven enclosure through the galvalume. That should replace the distance that is required for the posts and lathing for that section of fence. That is about four more inches on a standard fence construction .
                          joe watson

                          "A year from now, you will wish that you had started today "

                          My Build
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                          • #14
                            Interesting idea. Is the main reason you are recommending the metal for weather protection? If I didn't want metal and wanted to go in another direction what other options would I have? Stucco? What about simply painting the durock with something waterproof like drylok?

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                            • #15
                              If you tape and seal the seams, Drylok would be great! imo.
                              joe watson

                              "A year from now, you will wish that you had started today "

                              My Build
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