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  • Gulf
    replied
    Russell,

    Your right. Next time, I hope that I can do a full WFO version for you and Joan. Also, maybe some collard greens cooked in the fireplace. I think that ya'll will like them better than ya'll did the turnip greens .

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    When I had an opportunity to visit Gulf last fall, he was going to make these for me but the weather did not cooperate so he owe's me a batch next time I am in NOLA. Did order some in NOLA but I am sure his are better ;-)

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  • Gulf
    replied
    "Oysters Redneckefeller" is a term that I coined.

    Oysters Rockefeller and New Orleans grilled oysters are both favorites of mine. Oysters Rockefeller is the original and is baked in an oven. Both require fresh oysters in the shell, keeping the bottom part of the shell for the cook. I'm about an hour inland from the gulf and can only get live, whole oysters in bags of 100 on special order. However, it is real easy to buy shucked oysters in pint sizes, about 24 to the jar. I have been working on my own recipe for oysters Rockefeller using the shucked oysters. Others have been working on this, so there are stainless steel and ceramic oyster shells available. But, they are very proud of them $$.

    The recipe for the original Oysters Rockefeller is a closely guarded secret by Antoine's in NOLA. There are many rip off recipes on the net that are very close to the flavor. This one is very close to what I do but, I use collard greens and yellow onions to replace the spinach. I also replace the anise flavored liqueur with Ameretto. The kicker to what I do is using shallow muffin pans in place of the oyster shells. It gets a zero for presentation, but it scores very high on the taste test. Since my wife does not eat oysters, I make a pan or two with shrimp in the same sauce. That is real good too. I'm not finished experimenting. The pan in the pic was done @ 350F. The pans that I used are oven safe up to 400F. I'm looking for some more that can cook safely up to 450F or higher. I also intend to try some with a live fire in the oven. I will let you know how that turns out.

    Also note that his recipe is best eaten with french bread to sop up all the juices left in the pan from the oysters.
    Last edited by Gulf; 02-07-2017, 08:12 PM.

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  • RandyJ
    replied
    Gulf what exactly are oysters redneckfeller? They sound tasty.

    Randy

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Wood11,

    You're very welcome. I'm just wondering if the pics and links made sense? Now that all of the superbowl weekend cooking is over, I may be able to elaborate more if necessary. It has been a full weekend of firing the oven, caveman steaks, roasts, oysters redneckefeller and all the usual cold beverages .
    Last edited by Gulf; 02-06-2017, 06:53 PM.

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  • wood11
    replied
    Thank you again.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Maybe this link will help with the definitions of stretcher and shiner. My chimney goes through a wood framed roof. Masonry chimneys are usually 2 layers of some type of masonry. Nowadays, most are built with a clay liner and a surround of face brick. Finding a clay liner that is the perfect size for a WFO is not very easy. Going back to post #6: The first pic and the link "WFO Chimney" shows how I used the firebrick laid as shiners to line my chimney. The 2nd pic and the link "Outdoor Fireplace" will show the firebrick (in my case a very dense solid clay paver) laid as stretchers with a face brick surround. If your oven is sitting out away from any other structures, you may be able to get by with just building the the chimney with just one layer of firebrick laid as stretchers. I don't advise that but, I've seen it done.

    EDIT: The most economical and probably the best mortar for a WFO is what we call "home brew". Sand, hydrated lime, portland cement, and fireclay, At 3-1-1-1 parts respectively.
    Last edited by Gulf; 02-05-2017, 06:50 AM.

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  • wood11
    replied
    Gulf, could you please elaborate on post #6.
    - What does "firebrick liner as shiners" mean. Is the firebrick the liner? What about the mortar specification, such that it doesn't degrade.

    My confusion comes because I only had envisioned a layer of firebrick only. Only just learning that chimneys are apt to fail.

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  • wood11
    replied
    Gulf, insightful.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    It is not good to have rebar in refractory due to the different expansion rates when heated. That section (and entire ovens for that matter) have been succesfully cast. Here is a search of the site for cast ovens. I'm sure that a recipe or two for cast refractory can be found somewhere in there. When searching through the threads pay particular attention to any comments by david s . He is an expert on refractory casts.

    In your drawing of the chimney (it may just be a shortcoming in the drafting software) the bricks are not laid correctly?

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  • wood11
    replied
    Is it acceptable to have part of the chimney as a mortar mix with steel reinforcement inside, as per attached sketch. Any experiences?

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Wood-fired oven 4-Feb.jpg
Views:	73
Size:	1.24 MB
ID:	395903

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  • wood11
    replied
    Understood!

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    If you decide to install brick around the chimney, you may have to bolster the side walls of the vent arch due to the weight of the brick.

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  • wood11
    replied
    texman, thanks for clarifying. Attached is design so far but it will change for the front/chimney. I can tell that there is a lot of thought required.
    Gulf, photos help.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Wood-fired oven 1.jpg Views:	1 Size:	1.30 MB ID:	395873
    Last edited by wood11; 02-02-2017, 07:13 PM.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    I did an all masonry chimney for my WFO. To reduce girth, weight, and brick, I laid the firebrick liner as shiners. I cut the facebrick back to 2" leaving a 2" void that was filled with vecrete. Here is a Picasa album with a few more pics of it: WFO Chimney.

    For my Outdoor Fireplace, I laid very dense clay pavers as stretchers to line the flue above the smoke chamber. The face brick on it are separated by about a 1/2" of space.

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