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Starting new build in Dallas

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Hey Russell, I did pick up a small 9" peel and yes it is a little tricky.
    Ricky I appreciate the compliment.

    This pic was taken about 3 weeks ago and shows the oven finished but I still need to complete the trim around the top. I left the brick down about and inch under the pergola and will put wire screen to cap the opening and then trim with a cedar. Want to have a little ventilation and also keep any small animals from making a home inside. Also trying to finish up the flag stone around the base and will show a finished walk around in a week or so.

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  • Chach
    replied
    Very nice design I like the round design. Also, your brick work is very clean. Really enjoyed seeing this come together.

    Ricky

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I see the carbon has burning off nicely. If you do not have one yet, get or make a banjo peel for turning your pies, I make my share of accidental "calzones" while learning how to use my oven.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Okay, the sixth fire and up to full temp. Holding heat without the door, that is next on the list after the brick is complete. But the day after it was still around 400. Baked our first three pies and can tell it will take some practice. At this point on 10/14/2019 I have about 30 brick left to lay and then to trim out the top. I am leaving the brick down about 1 1/2 inch below the pergola and will trim it with thin cedar.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Fifth fire and more headway on the outer wall.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Started the fourth fire and up over 400. Also good progress on the outer wall.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    I got two 3' sections of double walled 8" pipe, a cap, roof flashing, a rain hood and the pipe ceiling support. It all went in easily and after installed I built my third fire and smoke came out the top, just like it is supposed to.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    I picked up some toys to add to the built this past weekend and was able to get it all installed.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    I am sure that many long time members already know that I am not a real big fan of the "serpentine" flue. There are times when interlocking the corners are not possible. The serpentine is an example of that. In non-refreactory cases i've use wall ties, long screws, and or at least the mortar adhesion to take care of that. My personal rule is, if it will not fall in on itself while drystacked, then it won't fail under a load (or fire in this case). Your sepentine is pretty sharp imo and is of a concern for me. That said, the pins that you are using to transfer the load of the face brick arch to the inner arch may also work to transfer the weight back from a couple of the key elements of your serpentine to the face arch. Is that what you are intending to do?

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Question.
    I have been planning to stuff small strips of ceramic blanket in the gap that I left between the dome and the chimney throat and have been researching high temp caulk to seal it off. If the HT caulk, once brought up to temp, becomes very hard and probably transfers heat, would it be just as efficient to use Heat Stop 50 to fill the void once the blanket strips are inserted?

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    The second pic shows the chimney throat and the 4 stacked bricks that begin the outer arch. With these type of arches (throat and outer) the arch pushes down which forces the stacked bricks to push out so a buttress is needed. The outer wall (old Chicago brick) butts up against the chimney throat forming a buttress which you can see in pic 1. The outer arch will not have any type of buttress so I came up with a solution that I believe will work. I drilled holes in the ends of the fire brick and Chicago making sure the holes lined up. I used 4 Tapcon masonry anchors/screws and then cut the head off. I dry fitted the four bricks on each side using wood strips to get the holes lined up and it took a little bit to get these mortared in but it turned out pretty good and should support the arch.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    The old Chicago bricks and mortar are a very close match to the brick and mortar on our house that was built in 1961.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    I was able to get the chimney throat stacked out this past week and once both sides were complete the top was remarkably close to level. I came back with a 4 grinder and cleaned up all the joints but wanted to note the gap between the throat and the dome wall. You can see the lower bricks where I brought the blanket around stopping short to allow for the high temp caulk. I will fill the void with some cutoff strips of blanket where the throat curve starts. Also the anchor plate will be two courses higher than what is shown here.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Started on the chimney throat and put together the form. Dry laid the bricks to get an idea of how to cut them and hope to get the chimney built up to the top of the arch which is where I will start the SS chimney pipe. I also pickup another load of (250) old Chicago brick, this is about half way through unloading and stacking.

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  • fox
    replied
    Looking very good!

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