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  • Dwatkins
    started a topic Starting new build in Dallas

    Starting new build in Dallas

    I had one previous question but other than that new to the site. This build started out as a suggestion one evening as my wife and I were sitting out under the pergola and she thought we needed a counter top pizza oven that she saw in an ad. We would usually put the pizza stone in the oven or on the outside Blaze grill, simple enough. But no, I started searching pictures, ideas, and then drawing up some plans which evolved from a simple counter top oven to a 66" round slab, 45" interior oven, bricking the exterior to match the house, extending the pergola, and adding seating around the new oven. ??? What is wrong with people like us? How does it go from a couple hundred dollar suggestion to full blown thousands of dollars and months of work project? Am I alone here? Do other people suffer from this insanity? Well the pics that I have loaded start out with placing the new oven just off the pergola where the round table is next to the fence. I drew off on a 4 x 8 x 1/4 ply to make sure the dimensions were good and then dug it out and started the forms. To make sure the round slab actually came out round I found the center and made a kind of "Indispensable tool". I ripped down another sheet of 1/4" ply to bend for the forms and then ripped down a sheet of 1/8" Masonite to go inside so it would release from the concrete. Placed the rebar, picked up 45 50lbs bags of Quikrete, got out my $220 handy dandy Harbor Freight mixer and one hour and 35 minutes later, slab poured.

  • Gulf
    replied
    I would imagime that the Heat Stop 50 would have the same rate of conduction as brick touching brick. Russell UtahBeehiver and others have used types of reractory caulk and were satifsied with it's performance for the heat break. I dug most of the crap that I used out of that joint. I havent replaced it to date.

    I am using a piece of angle iron to move the load to each side past the arch.
    That should work. I used conctete lintels to do that. .But, I put a heck of a load on mine. The metal flue is not very heavy, unlsess you do a masonry surround to inclose it.
    Last edited by Gulf; 09-20-2019, 08:51 PM.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Hey Gulf thanks for the reply, my concern is the gap that I left between the dome wall and the chimney throat. Just thinking this may stop some of the heat transfer. Stuffed the gap with strips of ceramic blanket and need to decide how to seal the gap if at all. There will not be much weight on the outer arch once I complete the wall over the outer arch, I am using a piece of angle iron to move the load to each side past the arch.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    I am sure that many long time members already know that I am not a real big fan of the "serpentine" flue. There are times when interlocking the corners are not possible. The serpentine is an example of that. In non-refreactory cases i've use wall ties, long screws, and or at least the mortar adhesion to take care of that. My personal rule is, if it will not fall in on itself while drystacked, then it won't fail under a load (or fire in this case). Your sepentine is pretty sharp imo and is of a concern for me. That said, the pins that you are using to transfer the load of the face brick arch to the inner arch may also work to transfer the weight back from a couple of the key elements of your serpentine to the face arch. Is that what you are intending to do?

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Question.
    I have been planning to stuff small strips of ceramic blanket in the gap that I left between the dome and the chimney throat and have been researching high temp caulk to seal it off. If the HT caulk, once brought up to temp, becomes very hard and probably transfers heat, would it be just as efficient to use Heat Stop 50 to fill the void once the blanket strips are inserted?

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    The second pic shows the chimney throat and the 4 stacked bricks that begin the outer arch. With these type of arches (throat and outer) the arch pushes down which forces the stacked bricks to push out so a buttress is needed. The outer wall (old Chicago brick) butts up against the chimney throat forming a buttress which you can see in pic 1. The outer arch will not have any type of buttress so I came up with a solution that I believe will work. I drilled holes in the ends of the fire brick and Chicago making sure the holes lined up. I used 4 Tapcon masonry anchors/screws and then cut the head off. I dry fitted the four bricks on each side using wood strips to get the holes lined up and it took a little bit to get these mortared in but it turned out pretty good and should support the arch.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    The old Chicago bricks and mortar are a very close match to the brick and mortar on our house that was built in 1961.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    I was able to get the chimney throat stacked out this past week and once both sides were complete the top was remarkably close to level. I came back with a 4 grinder and cleaned up all the joints but wanted to note the gap between the throat and the dome wall. You can see the lower bricks where I brought the blanket around stopping short to allow for the high temp caulk. I will fill the void with some cutoff strips of blanket where the throat curve starts. Also the anchor plate will be two courses higher than what is shown here.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Started on the chimney throat and put together the form. Dry laid the bricks to get an idea of how to cut them and hope to get the chimney built up to the top of the arch which is where I will start the SS chimney pipe. I also pickup another load of (250) old Chicago brick, this is about half way through unloading and stacking.

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  • fox
    replied
    Looking very good!

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Started the curing over the weekend, started with this small fire. Temp came up to about 150 and stayed for a few hours. Will not do anymore curing until I finish the chimney but wanted to get a start. First pic is the simple jig I use for cutting the angle on both ends for all the outer wall bricks. Just a piece of 5/8 plywood with a 1x2 screwed to it on an angle. The outer wall forms the buttress where they meet the chimney arch.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    OK, so I went back to www.breadstoneovens.com here in Dallas and picked up another box of ceramic blanket, third box. As I said in the previous post, I was about 10sq ft short of having 3" on the entire dome after the second box and for what I have spent another buck and a quarter is not going to matter and I also don't want to skimp on the build so now most of the dome has 4". I used the orange string to hold the blanket in place until I got the chicken wire on and then untied the end and the string was easy to remove. Once the wire was in place I started back on the outside brick wall and the front on the arch landing.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Decided to go back and pick up another box is what I intended to say on the previous post.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    Picked up some CF blanket, fortunate to have a place local. Got both boxes on and about 10sq ft short in having 3" thick. When back and got another so will have 4' on most. I will save some to use when I build the door.

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  • Dwatkins
    replied
    I added a coat of Heat Stop 50 to the dome, just to add a little more mass and will start the blanket this week. I did a dry fit on the face of the "landing", looks kind of massive right now but I believe once I bring the outer wall up it should look just fine.

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