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  • #16
    Just put the final finish coat and ready to start low and slow cure process this week! Then I need to find metal studs to start framing for stone masons. I know it was not necessary to stucco if I am going to enclose, but I wanted to be able to use the oven until I can get the framing and stone work done. This time of year in Texas we get on and off rain so I wanted to get it water proofed as soon as possible before more rain and high temperatures...

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    • #17
      Looks great! Because you've done the outer finish layer, go very slowly on your curing fires...any internal moisture is going to "struggle" to escape. Too hot, too fast & you may find a few cracks in the outer render. Easy to patch that render after curing is complete...and the actual oven won't be affected. Looking forward to you getting to enjoy using that beauty!
      Mike Stansbury - The Traveling Loafer
      Roseburg, Oregon

      FB Forum: The Dragonfly Den build thread
      Available only if you're logged in = FB Photo Albums-Select media tab on profile
      Blog: http://thetravelingloafer.blogspot.com/

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      • #18
        Thanks! Low and slow is the plan, starting this weekend.

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        • #19
          Plus one on Mike's comment. You can start with a couple BBQ briquettes fires, this gets you around 200 F with no flame impingement. Remember, when you start using wood, one extra piece of wood on the fire will cause the temps to spike. You can cook a dutch oven when you do briquettes.
          Russell
          Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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          • #20
            Thanks Russell, I have seen enough of your comments on this forum that it’s embedded in my brain to go low and slow! Thanks for that. My plan was to build fire batches on my Weber, thermo-temp it and then put it in the oven

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            • #21
              If you have a chimney starter, if makes it easy to load into the oven. Gulf does this as well.

              Click image for larger version

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              Russell
              Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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              • #22
                Drying a new oven after the outer shell has been applied is like trying to boil a saucepan of water dry with the lid on. It is more likely to suffer from steam damage, but will eventually dry, just take way longer.
                Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                • #23
                  Yep, that’s what I am using. Mine no longer looks that good….. Click image for larger version

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                  • #24
                    Successful first 6 hour cure fire, After I figured out what it took to achieve 300deg it maintained 275 to 300 very well! Only needing to add one or two 2” round pieces of oak to maintain. Second 350deg burn today

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                    • #25
                      Thanks David, per FB instructions insulation and stucco is required prior to curing. Finished final cure of 500deg today. All five cure temps went well with zero cracking!! Yay
                      Ready to crank it up next week

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                      • #26
                        My advice is based on experience, but you should always follow the manufacturers advice.
                        Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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                        • #27
                          I very much appreciate your advice! To your point, though I do not have any cracking, I do see dark spots which to me could look like moisture crying to get out….

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                          • #28

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                            • #29
                              This is where you really need to be careful. When free water sublimates to vapor, the volume increases by 1500 times and pressure can build up under the dome and crack the stucco if there is not place for the steam to vent. As you increase the temperature the higher the chance of water turning to vapor in the area between the outer dome and stucco.
                              Russell
                              Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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                              • #30
                                How do you think I should proceed? Perhaps more lower temp burns? Drill holes in dark moisture looking spots?

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