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Finally decided on 32in castable dome

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  • modified9v
    replied
    david s thanks for the detailed response. When I get ready to pull the trigger I’ll start a new thread in an effort not to hi-jack this one. This casting stuff is intriguing.

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  • david s
    replied
    If you look carefully you will see a wire running from the arch around the gallery to hold it in place. I stand the arch off from the gallery with a piece of cardboard (removed in the pic) to maintain a small gap.As you've noted there is nothing holding the arch other than the mortar joint between the arch and the supporting slab apart from that wire. Take a closer look and you will see I cast eight wire ties embedded into the cast arch which then get tied into the outer shell. This system allows the inner parts of the oven to expand and contract freely inside the cooler decorative arch and outer shell.

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  • david s
    replied
    Originally posted by modified9v View Post
    Just finished reading your build start to finish. First off congratulations. Second, thank you for taking the time to provide a chronology of your project. I know how much work it is to put it altogether and share your highs and your lows as I did with my brick oven build in the Pompeii Oven Construction forum. The help we receive from everyone is amazing and priceless.

    I came upon your thread as I am looking to do a castable oven for a mobile application. My pizza have been so well received in my community that I’ve been asked to bring the game to the local brewery. Your thread has been very valuable to me in this regard.

    I do have one question: Do you, or anyone, think it is ok to make the Homebrew into more of a slurry, as in super wet and pourable so that it can be poured into a mold verses applied over the entire surface of the sand castle?

    Thank you and continued success with your WFO cooking,
    Mike V.
    There are a couple of big problems with that idea. Firstly, adding more water to the brew adds more volume to the mix so when it dries it creates more shrinkage, resulting in a weaker casting that also may crack as it can't shrink away from the inner mould. The viscosity can be lowered by adding super plasticiser rather than extra water, however if too much is added it creates separation of the materials with the heavier stuff settling on the bottom and the finer material rising to the surface. Some experience with its use is required to get the addition just right.
    The second problem with a lower viscosity mix is that it requires an inner and outer mould perhaps in several different pieces, as well as vibration to eliminate the air. This is the normal practice for casting in all kinds of materials, where multiple castings are made with the moulds being used many times. For a one off cast the work that this requires is just not worth all the extra effort. Experience in creating moulds is also highly desirable and it's doubtful that you could pull it off the first attempt.The material used for the moulds is also an important consideration as the casting process, especially with concretes, is particularly hard on the moulds. Don't even contemplate wooden moulds as they don't last more than a few castings before requiring repair or replacement. Fibreglass is better (that's what I use) but they also require maintenance and repair (about every dozen or so). Steel is the best material for moulding concretes, but the most difficult to fabricate.
    By contrast the ball up consistency applied over a sand castle form to produce a one piece casting is both easy and cheap, with minimal labour required to get a pretty good result.
    Last edited by david s; 07-22-2021, 07:54 PM.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    You should reach out to David S our casting expert. I do know of a couple cases where builders made some fiberglass forms and did a slurry type cast pour. One was Iron Pony (he thread may of disappeared when the Forum was hijacked a while back).

    Leave a comment:


  • modified9v
    replied
    Just finished reading your build start to finish. First off congratulations. Second, thank you for taking the time to provide a chronology of your project. I know how much work it is to put it altogether and share your highs and your lows as I did with my brick oven build in the Pompeii Oven Construction forum. The help we receive from everyone is amazing and priceless.

    I came upon your thread as I am looking to do a castable oven for a mobile application. My pizza have been so well received in my community that I’ve been asked to bring the game to the local brewery. Your thread has been very valuable to me in this regard.

    I do have one question: Do you, or anyone, think it is ok to make the Homebrew into more of a slurry, as in super wet and pourable so that it can be poured into a mold verses applied over the entire surface of the sand castle?

    Thank you and continued success with your WFO cooking,
    Mike V.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mullster
    replied
    Originally posted by Kris S View Post
    Looking great!
    So did the laminate worktop come in that black and sparkle finish, or did you paint it yourself?
    It came like that which was cool!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kris S
    replied
    Looking great!
    So did the laminate worktop come in that black and sparkle finish, or did you paint it yourself?

    Leave a comment:


  • Mullster
    replied
    Worktops!!

    Finishing touches (although I keep thinking of more to do) applied recently - I finally managed to install the worktops around the oven.

    This was hugely important to me because I’ve been frustrated by having to spend my time indoors prepping the pizza while everyone else was outside drinking and chatting! This way now I can bring everything outside and do all the prep and socialize all at the same time.

    Carried on the theme of sparkly and black for the worktops and in the end went for standard laminate worktop. I did almost go for solid wood but decided the regular oiling probably just wasn’t going to happen. Plus I really like the contrast of the black with the wood.

    Cutting the worktops to fit around the oven was daunting especially as I was doing it with a half decent jigsaw rather than a router but to be honest I’m chuffed with the result. I’ll be filling the gaps between worktop and oven soon enough - haven’t quite decided what to use for that - possibly some simple render and then paint over....

    Anyway - thought you’d like to see the final result - pizza parties have become the norm here now - just can’t wait for summer and for the COVID restrictions to lift so we can cater for more hungry friends!

    Leave a comment:


  • jfletch1305
    replied
    Thank you so much for posting such a detailed journey, it will be invaluable for me.

    Do you possibly have a complete list of the quantity of items used for the oven itself (base excluded)?

    Trying to workout how much of everything i'll need roughly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mullster
    replied
    Pallet wood cladding

    Well it’s taken a while - but I haven’t paid a penny for any pallets, although I will probably need to replace the broken hammer and mallet at some point that I broke smashing and prizing the pallets apart

    Still got worktops to install around the oven - plus I want to board the final panel of the pergola behind the oven - but no rush!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mullster
    replied
    Originally posted by Boogie-D View Post
    Aloha Mullster... I stayed up late reading your build last night and my heart sank for you, and for me when I got to the aftermath of your cast... I can feel you man.. you spend so much time and money you want it to come out killer... I was so glad you recovered... and was so happy when I got to your first pizza post... and seeing how much you enjoy it and how much every penny is worth it... well done for sticking it out... thanks for sharing... I am in the all in panic mode now ... way above budget... anxiety hi... I will be referencing your build and others for those little details... aloha
    Boogie-D Aloha - glad you enjoyed my tale! I’m really glad I found this forum - no way would I have built my oven like I did without it - it’s helped so much.

    Loving the oven - used it even with snow on the ground over winter but looking forward to the better weather and sunny days and actually eating the food outside without countless blankets! I’ll check out your thread now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Boogie-D
    replied
    Aloha Mullster... I stayed up late reading your build last night and my heart sank for you, and for me when I got to the aftermath of your cast... I can feel you man.. you spend so much time and money you want it to come out killer... I was so glad you recovered... and was so happy when I got to your first pizza post... and seeing how much you enjoy it and how much every penny is worth it... well done for sticking it out... thanks for sharing... I am in the all in panic mode now ... way above budget... anxiety hi... I will be referencing your build and others for those little details... aloha

    Leave a comment:


  • david s
    replied
    I use castable refractory because I manufacture ovens, but if I were just making one for myself I’d go with the homebrew. Not only is it way cheaper, but it’s far more user friendly. At 15 though that’s a very good price and yes, most castable refractory contains the burnout fibres. You can check by sieving a small amount. It also has the advantage of not requiring extended damp curing like a Portland cement based castable.

    Leave a comment:


  • emyrjones88
    replied
    Hi Mullster

    Like you I started looking at gym ball vermiculite dome before discovering this forum, As I’m likely to move house at some point In the next few year I don’t want to go into the expense of a brick Pompeii therefore I too have decided on a castable dome (hopefully on the cheap!)

    A few questions

    How much homebrew did you consume? And why did you decide on Homebrew instead of castable refectory or grog/Ciment Fondue

    Assuming total needed is around 150Kg?

    Dense castable

    15 for 25KG = 90

    https://www.castreekilns.co.uk/dense...-bag-865-p.asp Safe to assume that this contains burnout fibers?


    Homebrew

    Assuming ratio 3:1:1:1 sand, lime, Portland, fireclay = 69 (75kg sharp sand @6 + 25Kg Cement @10 + 25kg hydrated lime @12 900g Polypropylene fibres @11)

    Prices from Nick J C
    • Fireclay 25kg bag 30 (inc delivery) valentines clays
    • Cement 25kg x 2 10 Selco
    • hydrated lime 25kg x 1 12 Selco
    • Sharp sand ~
    • Polypropylene fibres 900g 11 ebay

    Grog/ Ciment Fondue

    Assuming 4:1 + Polypropylene fibers = 83

    https://www.castreekilns.co.uk/cimen...5kg-1396-p.asp Ciment Fondue - 20 per 25KG

    https://www.castreekilns.co.uk/1-3mm...5kg-2642-p.asp Grog 13 per 25 Kg

    DavidS as they are all similar in price do you have any opinion on which would be the best?

    Thanks
    Tomos


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  • skelly27
    replied
    Thanks Mullster for the progress. I've built the stand but not cast yet so learned a lot from your thread. Really helpful.

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