Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

30" Cast Scotland

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    You might want to put something on the blowing end to protect your pearly whites. I always tell guest, if they put their own toppings on the pizza that "less is best" don't over load the toppings on the pizza.

    Leave a comment:


  • sergetania
    replied
    I always check the temps using an IR thermometer just because I like numbers. When you get the feel of your oven it's easy enough to go by clearing the dome. General cooking temps when the top of the dome is clear, pizza temps when it all clears. Also, even if you use a thermometer it's not an exact science either because temps are different all over the oven.
    Different pizza styles require different temps. Roman and Bari styles will cook fine at 650-700F. Neapolitan need 750-900F at the bottom. The first time I had a pizza party I didn't want to push oven so I cooked Bari-style thin crust pizza. Turned out great. Maybe if you do pizza with greens on top at lower temps drizzle a bit more oil on top of the greens to prevent them from drying out... May be it will help.
    ​​​​​

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveholdn
    replied
    Thanks again sergetania and UtahBeehiver, I've got myself a wooden peel and a turning peel, I've also a tube of copper pipe left over from making the breather valve, so I'll slightly crush one end to make it a little easier to blow through.
    Really really small amount of condensation in one part of the plastic, pretty negligible to be honest. I've a pizza party next weekend so will try to get a little more heat into it without going full gas this week. Once you've moved the fire over to the edge, blown the ash away, what sort of temp are you looking for the cooking area to be? I have an IR thermometer which seems to do thr business but is that a good indicator or is the clearing of the dome a better indicator?

    Cheers team, very excited now for a 12 inch, thin crust, serrano ham, rocket and olive pizza!!!

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Go to "show me your tool" thread. I do use a piece of SS tubing to blow away ash after raking coals to the side initially and also after recharging floor. Some people flap the peels down and the ash drifts out through the chimney but the tubing works for me. Some have repurposed an old golf club shaft as well. A turning "banjo" peel is a must.

    Leave a comment:


  • sergetania
    replied
    I use a turning peel for everything - to get the wood in, move the coals around and get them out, get food in and out and even slap on the floor to clean it off the ash. I guess the latter could lead to cracking hearth bricks, hopefully not. I use a wooden peel to put pizza in. That's all the tools that are necessary in my opinion. Keep in mind, our ovens are very small, you can reach easily with hands almost anywhere but you definitely need decent (welder's) gloves

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveholdn
    replied
    Cheers UtahBeehiver ,ive reduced the heat and being a little more consistent, paying off as less and less condensation, no steam. Managed some cheese and toast, amazing to see the fruits of your labour. Cheers sergetania, making the door this week at some point.

    In regards to tools, I've ordered a wooden peel and think I also need a metal turning peel and rake? Anyone else use anything they feel they can't live without?

    Cheers again

    ​​​​​​​Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • sergetania
    replied
    Re door - you are right if you are thinking of high temp cooking like pizza, grilling, etc. However, cooking at lower temps requires a door whether you want to bake or slow roast a leg of lamb or a pork shoulder.

    Just be careful - don't fully close the oven with live fire and then open it a few minutes later. It may backdraft.

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    If you you see steam, you are heating too hot too fast. David S suggest placing a piece of plastic over the oven dome and watch for condensation this indicates that there is still water in the dome.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveholdn
    replied
    Thanks sergetania and JRPizza, super informative and I'll get on that after the last curing fire. The 6th fire last night saw damp patches over the top of the dome and what I thought was smoke coming through, I thought the dome has cracked but turned out it was actually steam!
    With regard to the door, I take it the door is only used to retain the heat of the oven once your finished cooking pizza?

    Cheers again

    ​​​​​​​Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • JRPizza
    replied
    Do a search for "top down fire". It is the only method I use (since I read about it here) as you can light it and walk away for a short time instead of having to stand by and feed the flames till it gets going. You will see some examples of really large top down stacks but I usually keep the pieces at the bottom around 2" round or square and progressively smaller on top.

    Leave a comment:


  • sergetania
    replied
    Two not-too-small logs parallel to each other on the entrance floor, crumpled paper and kindlings in between (a small fire starter here won't hurt either), then two small logs perpendicular to the first two on top of them, then another layer perpendicular again (like building a log cabin), the size of logs increasing. Build it as high as you can, push into the oven and, if you have room, add another layer of big logs on top, two or three. Fire, make sure it does not die down. Pretty simple. This is for only when your oven is cured, fast and hot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveholdn
    replied
    So 5th fire going well, small hairline cracks here and there but nothing major to report thankfully. In terms of fires can I ask everyone how people are setting up their fire? I've managed to get kiln dried oak for a few favours so going to try those, but in terms of setting the fire, are people doing the criss Cross method with kindling and then adding logs once the fire is going? And I take it the charcoal is only added for the curing fires or are people using it to get the fire going also when cooking pizza?

    Any advice again greatly appreciated, cheers.

    Dave Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20210427_180259_resize_12.jpg
Views:	223
Size:	101.4 KB
ID:	437509 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20210427_180252_resize_25.jpg
Views:	168
Size:	209.5 KB
ID:	437510

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveholdn
    replied
    Hi Kris S , good start on yours, it's coming together. I will put sides on, just wooden slats down to the tiled area so the dome is out of the elements, my mate is going to look at some sort of removable front door, I'll do this after I've rendered though so I have access.

    Cheers sergetania , I'll have a look over your posts again at your door. I think the verm'te is dry due to the good weather we've had.

    Leave a comment:


  • sergetania
    replied
    Daveholdn whatever it's worth I am very happy with the performance of my door that is simply cut from a sheet of stainless steel (probably ~1.5mm). Stainless steel does not conduct heat well at all. My plan was to start with a single layer and if needed add a second, possibly with insulation in between. I don't think I will. The door works fine as it is. The oven holds enough heat the next day for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kris S
    replied
    Congrats on the first fire!

    About your roof: are you planning on also closing the sides?
    The oven is well protected from above and the back now, so I guess your prevailing wind/rain direction does not come frome the front or sides?

    Right now I'm leaning towards enclosing my oven completely because it's in the open exposed to wind and rain from all sides vs. yours which is already against a wall/fence.
    But I would love to keep some of the igloo shape as well...

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X