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  • #61
    Since we got SLAMMED with 18” of snow just before Christmas, there is no chance of seeing the oven until spring. Even though the family agreed to not buy presents for each other this holiday, my parents didn’t exactly listen. Knowing how much time and effort I spent on the oven and how excited I was throughout the whole build process, they did something a little special. This is a fantastic gift!!!! It’s 3D routed and made from wood, so I need to figure out how to set it in epoxy so it can be hung outside.
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    Last edited by w650gb500; 12-29-2020, 07:21 AM.
    My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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    • #62
      Originally posted by w650gb500 View Post
      Since we got SLAMMED with 18” of snow just before Christmas, there is no chance of seeing the oven until spring. Even though the family agreed to not buy presents for each other this holiday, my parents didn’t exactly listen. Knowing how much time and effort I spent on the oven and how excited I was throughout the whole build process, they did something a little special. This is a fantastic gift!!!! It’s 3D routed and made from wood, so I need to figure out how to set it in epoxy so it can be hung outside.
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      Very Nice touch. you can always hang that inside an get one sand blasted in stone and won't have to worry about it rotting or the epoxy discoloring. There are local places that do it and places on Etsy that do it.

      Ricky
      Last edited by Chach; 12-30-2020, 09:49 PM.
      My Build Pictures
      https://onedrive.live.com/?authkey=%...18BD00F374765D

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      • #63
        Very beautiful build... fantastic views... really cool rock features.. congrats..
        My build:: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...nch-wfo-hawaii

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        • #64
          Still snowed in. I need it to melt so I can try out the new oven. Click image for larger version

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          My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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          • #65
            Beautiful build, can I ask what sort of roof tiles you used? I like the look of it and I'm also gonna build an enclosed oven.

            Also, how did you construct the 4 small pieces of wall around the chimney? (sorry if unclear, english is not my mother tongue)
            Is it also a metal stud framework on which you attach the hardieboard? I can't deduce it from your pictures...

            My 70cm (28") build: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...losure-belgium

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            • #66
              Thanks for the compliment.

              The roof is flagstone that I had here at the house. I bought it years ago to cap a stacked stone wall, but never ends up using it. I was going to cover the whole outside with it, but she liked the brick better, so you know how it goes, “a happy wife, happy life”. The brick was A LOT more work but I think it came out better than the field stone would have. The pieces are approx 1” thick, were 12” wide and 18” long. It’s a HEAVY roof, but I really like the way it turned out. You can see a piece on the counter in the second picture.

              As for the chimney, I has a roll of sheet steel at my shop. I cut and used rivets to make the 4 sides. I left a 1” flange at the bottom and screwed it to the cement board on the roof. I then glued and screwed Hardie backer board to it on the 4 sides just like the rest of the enclosure. Then it was just a matter of finishing the roof tiles and applying the stone. Hopefully you can see my explanation better in the following pictures.

              The entire enclosure is covered with Hardie Backer board, but many masons would have used Dura-Rock board instead. I personally like the Hardie board because it’s easier to cut/snap and doesn’t fall apart as easily.

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              My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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              • #67
                I have limited experience with metal stud framing, I’ve once erected a simple metal stud wall where I used special self tapping screws to hold two studs together, but they were a pain in the … to use.

                Did you use rivets to join the studs of your doghouse framework as well?

                This type of pliers is also sometimes used around here to join studs, they don’t use rivets, instead they kind of ‘pinch’ them together.
                Do you think this would work as well, sturdy enough for the frame?

                Thanks for your time!

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                My 70cm (28") build: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...losure-belgium

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                • #68
                  I probably used over a hundred self-tapping screws. 2 different types, self-drilling and pierce-point although I prefer the self-drilling ones. The studs are screwed to each other and the Hardie board is screwed to the studs. The only rivets used were in the chimney sheet metal to attach the bottom flange to the sides.

                  Personally I would not use that tool for my framework. Self-tapping screws go very quickly, I’m not sure why you had difficulty with them? The framework is the foundation of whatever you are attaching to it. It will be supporting LOTS of weight during your build. Basically you are building a small yet very heavy house. You would certainly nail or screw your framing walls together right? You wouldn’t use a desk stapler simply to make sure they don’t move until you put the drywall in place. It’s your build, but I have a tendency to “over-build” everything.


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                  Last edited by w650gb500; 03-11-2021, 05:20 AM.
                  My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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                  • #69
                    Yes the first picture are the ones I used, with the ‘self drilling heads’. I wasn’t particularly impressed with their ‘self drilling’ property. They would skid all over the place until they found some grip and actually start drilling the hole, which then ends up at a slightly other place then intended!

                    Anyway I’ve got some left and I’ll go that route, we’ll see how it pans out.

                    It’s not for immediately, maybe something for June.

                    Thanks for your advice!
                    My 70cm (28") build: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...losure-belgium

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                    • #70
                      There are different profile studs as well as starter channel. The studs I’ve used in the past have numerous indentations/dimples on them which helps to locate the tip of the screw. Starter channel is normally smooth. I wonder if you were using all starter channel? Here is a picture which shows both types.
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                      My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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                      • #71
                        You know, maybe you're right, it was one of the first DIY things I did back then, learned a lot since!
                        It may well be I used the smooth horizontal studs for the verticals as well...
                        My 70cm (28") build: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...losure-belgium

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                        • #72
                          OK gang, it’s getting to be time to uncover the oven and actually begin using it. While I still have a few weeks, I decided to build a door as it’s the last piece of the actual oven that needs to get done.

                          I read through the long “show us your door thread” as well as searching the interwebs for ideas on how to build it and more so how to make it look good. So, off to the shop to see what I could come up with. I grabbed some 2” x 1/8” flat stock and a sheet of 0.060” cold-rolled mild steel and got started. Last year I had made templates for both the inner and outer arches out of 2” “polyiso” insulation board so I had a bit of a head start getting going. I rolled the arches to match the template and welded the frames. Pretty easy, but I made a drive home to make certain that they both fit. Once I verified they fit and marked their relation to one another, it was back to the shop to do more welding. Next I attached a back plate to both the inner and outer arches. To insulate the door, I had some of the 2” CaSi board left over and figured it would be a good choice for the door and why I chose to make the arches 2” wide each. I filled the inner arch, tack welded it in place and ran out to the house again to test fit it one last time before final welding. IT FIT, so back to finish up the door shell.

                          After getting the back side fully welded, it was time to tackle the front of the door. This part is basically the same procedure, but you guys have set the bar pretty high, so I need to use the creative side of my brain and make the front of the door look good. I need to decide on the overall look first and then figure out handles, thermometer, coating and color. Hopefully I can get it done early next week.

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                          My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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                          • #73
                            Door's looking terrific! In my opinion, adding a thermometer to the door is a waste. An IR gun is quite inexpensive and very effective. The oven chamber heat is very stable after a firing, so a constant reading from the door thermometer isn't important (again IMHO ). I fire the night before a bread bake of 15-20 loaves and by experience know my oven will be heated to a 600-700F range (cleared). By the time I'm ready to bake in mid-afternoon, the temp's at my target range of 560-580F. I use my IR gun to check current temp, but since the oven's mass keeps such a consistent chamber temp, I only check 2-3 times during an afternoon bake session. I've noted over the years that some builders invest a lot of time & effort installing temperature probes at various depths & positions within the oven and within a short time ignore the readings. Again, just my opinion, but you can always drill & install a thermometer in the door later...if you find you like having a "dial face" on your oven.
                            Mike Stansbury - The Traveling Loafer
                            Roseburg, Oregon

                            FB Forum: The Dragonfly Den build thread
                            Available only if you're logged in = FB Photo Albums-Select media tab on profile
                            Blog: http://thetravelingloafer.blogspot.com/

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                            • #74
                              You are probably right about the thermometer. It might go in just for the “look” of being a bit hi-tech. As hi-tech as a centuries old cooking with fire is.

                              Next decision will be how to coat it. Paint? Cerakote? High temp powder coat? E-coat?
                              My newbie build thread: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ie-ready-to-go

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                              • #75
                                Did you build your door so that it would just slide into the opening or is the outer face bigger to fit up against a reveal?
                                I went for a high-tech rust and creosote finish on my door I am thinking about adding a thin layer of wood veneer as the steel transmits a bit of heat, but I usually just fit a thin plywood outer door up against the handles of my steel one which really helps reduce the amount of heat that bleeds out overnight.
                                Last edited by JRPizza; 04-10-2021, 12:02 PM.
                                My build thread
                                https://community.fornobravo.com/for...h-corner-build

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