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Is there a "text book" Pompeii build thread on here that someone can recommend?

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  • Is there a "text book" Pompeii build thread on here that someone can recommend?

    Hello, I have been visiting on this site for years now, coming back every few months to look at some of the really great build threads. I've noticed that there are some really talented and skilled members on this forum, and it seems as though it's just part of the build process to customize one or two aspects of a design. I also see a thread every now and then of how things sometimes go wrong when a builder ventures too far from the norm. There are also always a million and one ways to overdo something, and create needless complication and expense. So, my question is, are there a few threads that members might recall that are basically a total text book build? I may finally be ready to put shovel to soil and start this thing, and I want to do it right. Thanks.

  • #2
    Welcome to the forum as a participant! I'd suggest starting with this thread as the best source of what you are looking for. The definition of what is a "standard" build has changed over time, as the community has developed new techniques. It's really up to you where you want to jump in!

    https://community.fornobravo.com/for...n-the-archives
    My build progress
    My WFO Journal on Facebook
    My dome spreadsheet calculator

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    • #3
      HI Montclaire, welcome to the journey! While reading up on the threads Deejayoh provided, if you think you know how big of an oven you want it is a good time to start working on a plan view (looking down on the oven), either using a cad type program, a full size mockup, or both. This is where you will quickly find out what you know and what you need to figure out before you get any farther. You start with the oven ID, add the standard half brick dome thickness of 4.5", add insulation and either render for an igloo or the house type structure for the final look. This will tell you what your minimum hearth slab width has to be. Mock up what kind of landing you want (a brick and a half, 13.5" is used by many) and you can get an idea of minimum hearth slab depth.
      The "must read" list was created before I did my build, and I am not sure it would have made the list anyway, but I tried to go over the initial layout thinking in my thread so you might want to take a look at it while you are reading up. Also if you decide to go the CAD route and need some help, I'd be willing to offer an hand and I am sure others would too. I can even give you a copy of the file I used so you could play with different dimensions if you like doing things on computers. I ended up starting with CAD then building a cardboard template (didn't trust my cad skills) as I believe in the measure twice cut once philosophy, especially when working with concrete and brick.
      Lastly if you don't have a copy of the FB Pompeii oven plans you might want to pick up a copy. Although a little outdated and thin on corner build details, there is lots of useful information and many builders use it as a starting reference point.
      Last edited by JRPizza; 03-23-2017, 11:47 AM.
      My build thread
      http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks to you both. I am going to go with a 36" oven for cost and practicality reasons. For the base platform I will be using something called Versa-Lok, which is a dry stack architectural block. This will tie into a larger outdoor kitchen space but none of that will effect the oven construction. I have no experience with CAD, I'll probably try to find some designs on the forum that I think are simple enough for a novice to copy and go from there. I have some very limited experience with concrete and laying tile, and I have small electric mixer so I should be ok as long as I keep it simple and ask questions. I do have the FB plans but I know a lot has changed since they were written.

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        • #5
          Not really sure there is such a thing as text book build. It really comes down to how much of a perfectionist you are. I cannot imagine building a life sized cardboard replica of an oven. In my mind it would take just as much time to build the model as it would to build the oven, just different tools.

          If you think you are going for a really precise build with hardly any space for mortar joints, then there are some very cool builds to look at. I have also personally watched a guy with a hammer and trowel build a 32" fully functional oven from the floor up in 6 hours. The two builds both cook pizza really well and the decision to spend 24 hours behind the saw is completely up to you.

          Just yesterday I was just thinking about the old Stanley advertisement line "we want to help you do things right" The question is what is the right way to do something? So many experts and most have no idea what they are talking about. Ask a guy who built his oven in the back yard what the most important thing is and you get an answer like "figure twice the time and three times the cost". Ask a guy who builds ten ovens a month what the most important thing is and you get an answer like "how do you intend to use the oven" Both answers are right.
          The cost of living continues to skyrocket, and yet it remains a popular choice.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dakzaag View Post
            I cannot imagine building a life sized cardboard replica of an oven. In my mind it would take just as much time to build the model as it would to build the oven, just different tools.
            I was talking about the value of drawing about 4 concentric circles on a piece of cardboard, and using it to figure out width and depth of the oven. It was something Gulf encouraged me to do and I found it to be a very valuable tool. Since I made my indispensable tool able to hold a marker I was able to draw my circles without creating any additional tools. Since you are going to need an arch form anyway, making one early in the process allows you to place it on the template and plan where to set the inner arch.
            My build thread
            http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...h-corner-build

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome to the forum Montclaire! I'm in central Virginia.

              Having never laid a brick before, I downloaded the FornoBravo Pompeii plans, then looked at the build by Dino_Pizza https://community.fornobravo.com/alb...n-gallery-3412.

              Here's my progress link https://community.fornobravo.com/for...en-in-virginia

              I used Ken524's build for the enclosure.

              My oven build pix are here https://get.google.com/albumarchive/...CPfMh4SMmcnQAQ

              You won't find anyone better than the guides on this forum.
              All the best with your build. Incidentally, I don't think that you will find much difference in cost between your 36" build vs. the standard 42" build.
              Link to my build
              http://www.fornobravo.com/forum/f8/4...nia-19904.html

              Link to my pictures
              https://plus.google.com/photos/10871...CPfMh4SMmcnQAQ

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              • #8
                The full size oven footprint template has been used many times by builders on this site through the years. I have seen them made out of plywood. Like JR says, they can be made out of cardboard. They can be made out of poster board taped together. Anything that is cost efficent and at your disposal will work. The concentric circles that JR mentions is the inside and outside radius of the dome brick. Then the outside thickness of the insulation. Then the outside thickness of the finished render (if any). It should also include the layout of the entry and the finished face of the oven. The concentric circles along with a side view of concentric circles will help you decide the exact placement of the inner arch. JR has an excellent cad drawing of this. (I verified the same diminsions of JR;'s entry on the back of a chest type freezer with a yardstick and a dry erase marker. I Had to clean that up before SWMBO got home ) That will help you to further refine the oven footprint template. When it is finalized, you can use it to lay out the foundation, stand, and what you want for a landing even before you break ground. The template, imo will save a lot of unexpected surprises later on.
                Last edited by Gulf; 03-25-2017, 04:59 PM.
                Joe Watson " A year from now, you will wish that you had started today" My Build Album / My Build

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by mirassou View Post
                  Welcome to the forum Montclaire! I'm in central Virginia.

                  Having never laid a brick before, I downloaded the FornoBravo Pompeii plans, then looked at the build by Dino_Pizza https://community.fornobravo.com/alb...n-gallery-3412.

                  Here's my progress link https://community.fornobravo.com/for...en-in-virginia

                  I used Ken524's build for the enclosure.

                  My oven build pix are here https://get.google.com/albumarchive/...CPfMh4SMmcnQAQ

                  You won't find anyone better than the guides on this forum.
                  All the best with your build. Incidentally, I don't think that you will find much difference in cost between your 36" build vs. the standard 42" build.
                  Thanks for the links, lots of good info there. There are two other threads that I also found interesting, one from Slovenia which made use of shims from scrap fire brick, and the other from PA which had an unusual base but what looked like a fairly easy to copy dome and arch design.

                  https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ld-in-slovenia

                  https://community.fornobravo.com/for...-36-oven-build

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