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36" WFO in Candia, NH, USA - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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  • MichaelPBoisvert
    started a topic 36" WFO in Candia, NH, USA

    36" WFO in Candia, NH, USA

    Hi, I'm throwing myself at this project and I'm way over my head. I'm building a 36" Tuscan style Pompeii from the "Build and Authentic Itailing Wood-Burning Oven" plans. I have limited framing and wood working skills, and have zero experience with Masonry, but I think if I take my time and stay patient I can conquer this thing (wishful thinking). I've already built my foundation and Block frame (photo attached) I plan on following the plans as close as possible and using Youtube videos as well. Are there things that I should avoid from these plans or will I get a decent product following those steps? One of the key pieces I'm deciding on, is insulating the Hearth with Fiber boards or cement and vericulite. It seems like the fiberboard is the way to go due to time savings and oven efficiency?

    I'm in the process of purchasing FireBricks. Prices seem all over the board. What are people typically paying?

    Any words of encourgment and advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers
    Mike

  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Start a thread under "Pompeii Oven Construction" and I will merge current post to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Start a thread under "Pompeii Oven Construction" and I will merge current post to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    Should I continue to post progress here, or start a new post under Brick oven photos?

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    Should I continue to post progress here, or start a new post under Brick oven photos?

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    Thanks JR! That's sounds like a great way to go. I learned a few other things from that thread as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    Thanks JR! That's sounds like a great way to go. I learned a few other things from that thread as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRPizza
    replied
    Michael, I recommend all new builders read the thread linked below. Good information about what would folks do differently. Several builders echo what Russell said above, just doing a bevel on the sides of the bricks to keep internal joints tight would save a lot of time with little to no effect on oven performance or looks. You will use more mortar, but if you are going the homebrew route it is relatively cheap.

    https://community.fornobravo.com/for...change?t=12453

    Leave a comment:


  • JRPizza
    replied
    Michael, I recommend all new builders read the thread linked below. Good information about what would folks do differently. Several builders echo what Russell said above, just doing a bevel on the sides of the bricks to keep internal joints tight would save a lot of time with little to no effect on oven performance or looks. You will use more mortar, but if you are going the homebrew route it is relatively cheap.

    https://community.fornobravo.com/for...change?t=12453

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    More great info, thanks again! I'm drafting up my design and will post it for advice, in the proper location of the forum. Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    More great info, thanks again! I'm drafting up my design and will post it for advice, in the proper location of the forum. Cheers

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I did do a full side compound bevel on my bricks, I did to show myself I could, would I do it again, most likely not (a lot of saw time) That said, you can accomplish the same inside joint tolerance by just doing a bevel cut but only the first inch or so from the inside of the dome out (where the bricks conflict - you will not see this the first couple courses but as you go up this cut eliminates the "inverted V"), then let mortar be you friend and fill in the gap on the back side. I believe JRPizza did this and his inside joints look very nice. This way you can spend you time resources elsewhere.

    Also here is an example of a build that did not use bevel angle and the inverted v is prominent.

    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I did do a full side compound bevel on my bricks, I did to show myself I could, would I do it again, most likely not (a lot of saw time) That said, you can accomplish the same inside joint tolerance by just doing a bevel cut but only the first inch or so from the inside of the dome out (where the bricks conflict - you will not see this the first couple courses but as you go up this cut eliminates the "inverted V"), then let mortar be you friend and fill in the gap on the back side. I believe JRPizza did this and his inside joints look very nice. This way you can spend you time resources elsewhere.

    Also here is an example of a build that did not use bevel angle and the inverted v is prominent.

    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
    Another mortar option is a home brew version that has work very well for the members. 3 sand, 1 lime, 1 portland, 1 FIRE Clay and less expensive. You will use more mortar than you think. Heat Stop 50 does have a recommended maximum joint size up to 1/2". You will see these joint sizes larger than this on the back side of the dome or arch bricks unless you do compound tapering of the brick (not worth it IMHO). That said, I have seen many builder use this product with larger joint sizes,
    I see in your build it seems you used compound tapering (maybe I'm confused?) So your opinion is greatly appreciated. Is there a specific reason you don't think it is worth it? I was looking at the Dome calculator and it seems that utilizes some pretty intricate cutting as well, which I'm not necessarily opposed to. What is the negative with using half blocks only cutting 1 or 2 per lift, at angles without face mortor, like mentioned in the original plans? Thanks again for your input.

    Leave a comment:


  • MichaelPBoisvert
    replied
    Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
    Another mortar option is a home brew version that has work very well for the members. 3 sand, 1 lime, 1 portland, 1 FIRE Clay and less expensive. You will use more mortar than you think. Heat Stop 50 does have a recommended maximum joint size up to 1/2". You will see these joint sizes larger than this on the back side of the dome or arch bricks unless you do compound tapering of the brick (not worth it IMHO). That said, I have seen many builder use this product with larger joint sizes,
    I see in your build it seems you used compound tapering (maybe I'm confused?) So your opinion is greatly appreciated. Is there a specific reason you don't think it is worth it? I was looking at the Dome calculator and it seems that utilizes some pretty intricate cutting as well, which I'm not necessarily opposed to. What is the negative with using half blocks only cutting 1 or 2 per lift, at angles without face mortor, like mentioned in the original plans? Thanks again for your input.

    Leave a comment:

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