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  • Depends on you final outer coating, if in a structure you are probably good as is. Remember there is a ton of water in pcrete and you need to really let it dry out before or if you put on a render coat.
    Russell
    Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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    • Thank you Russel. So back to my original question, when the mix cures, what is the consistency supposed to be? Should it be hard, like cement, or is it crumbly?
      thanks. Just looking for a point of reference.
      John

      "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
      ______________
      My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

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      • The higher the proportion of cement in the mix, the stronger it will be, however it also reduces its insulating capacity markedly. If you are not asking this layer to insulate then you can make it stronger by simply making it richer. I find a 10:1 ratio is about as lean as is workable yet still providing sufficient strength to act as a firm substrate for rendering over. If you leave the surface too loose it sets as a rather crumbly layer. I tap the surface with the flat of the trowel when I've finished the later and this compresses it slightly as well as producing a nice flat surface that doesn't dry crumbly. Also a little powdered clay added to the mix imparts some stickiness. I also find a 50?50 mix of both perlite and vermiculite (medium grade) produces a better result than either of them alone.

        Click image for larger version

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        Last edited by david s; 04-15-2021, 06:31 PM.
        Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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        • One other question.... once the entire dome is covered with the perlcrete/cement mix (in my case about 3 inches thick), about how long to wait before start doing the curing fires?

          Thank you all for the help.
          John

          "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
          ______________
          My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

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          • I think you can start (small) curing fires as soon as you have your insulation layers on.
            My 42" build: https://community.fornobravo.com/for...ld-new-zealand
            My oven drawings: My oven drawings - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

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            • Originally posted by CapePizza View Post
              One other question.... once the entire dome is covered with the perlcrete/cement mix (in my case about 3 inches thick), about how long to wait before start doing the curing fires?

              Thank you all for the help.
              So much depends on how dry the layer has become. Weather, thickness of the layer etc. When it turns white you'll think it's dry but it won't be deeper in. If fired too aggressively the vermicrete layer can swell and crack. Try the sheet plastic over it during firing to observe any condensation on its underside, or use a garden moisture meter.
              Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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              • Finally finished up the percrete layer. I think starting out the first layer was a bit dry and caused application issues. Making it a bit wetter made the rest of the applications much easier. Having let it dry out for a number of days now, I'm planning on starting the curing fires today. I'm surprised how "large" the oven looks. Having a 32 inch oven, this most recent application of the perlcrete layer makes it look much larger than when it was just having the brick. Hard to imagine how large an oven in the 45" size or larger must be.
                John

                "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
                ______________
                My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

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                • Calling my oven "finished". A few weeks ago completed the outer rendering layers, waterproofing and all. What a project! I'm so happy with our oven and could not have done it without the generous sharing of information from the members on this forum. So a big THANK YOU!! I continue to be amazed at the ovens other's build and the great looking food that comes out of these ovens. I'm realizing now that the oven is done, learning to cook in it is the next learning experience. I'm also on to my next project..... building a teardrop trailer. Photo attached of my CAD for it . Happy cooking travels to all.... and again, a big THANK YOU!!
                  John

                  "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
                  ______________
                  My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

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                  • JOHN!
                    Great news!! Really happy for you and now you are making plans to bugger off instead of hanging about that lovely oven!?
                    HA! Seems you're happiest as a busy lad!
                    Have fun!! You are giving thanks to the forum (and rightly so) but you have given much to it yourself and I know I am grateful to have learned from you!

                    Happy cooking - Happy travels!
                    Barry
                    You are welcome to visit my build HERE

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                    • Hi John... a great looking oven indeed!!! What makes these projects really fun is that, while everyone is basically building the same thing (a dome oven) there's so much individuality and character that gets incorporated into them. For example, your oven is top notch, no question.. but you look at how you placed these little "details" around your oven... the sticks and rusted iron that are implemented into your gazebo. The way your rocks cascade from in back of the oven pedestal, and that fabulously rustic table you have for a prep area. I have no doubt that your oven space is now the major focal point of your yard. I also have to image that where most house parties always end up in the kitchen, all your parties will no doubt be under that gazebo. Hopefully I'll have a chance to experience that in a few months myself.

                      Quick question.. did you build that prep table yourself.. and where did you score your peel? I was thinking to make one..however after a long oven build that may be the last thing I want to do at that point. lol.

                      Well done!!! Good luck with the trailer!!!

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                      • Barry and Ope-Dog... thanks so much for your nice comments. I appreciate it. Like I mentioned in a prior post, it is really great to see everyone's builds progressing. To think I started my oven last August just when the pandemic was starting to rear its uglyness, building the oven was a great distraction. Although it took a lot longer to build than I had expected, and, I have to admit; a bit more $$ than I would have liked..... the end result is so worth it all. Enjoy building / finishing your ovens. The oven is a ton of fun to cook in. Regards, John.
                        John

                        "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
                        ______________
                        My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

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                        • Ope-Dog, I apologize, I totally spaced out on answering your questions:
                          The "prep table" I built a number of years ago. It was built as a "sales stand" that was placed on the road to sell eggs laid by our hens. We now have regular customers so we don't sell road side now. The table has come in handy for prep.
                          The peel... I don't remember exactly where I purchased it. I think it was from a husband-wife team that sells pizza stuff and if my memory is correct, they are out of Chicago. I'll try and did up the info on that. I have seen the exact same peel from a number of sellers. It is a good peel. The steel blade part is very thin and gets under the pizza nicely. I'll get back to you if I find the seller.
                          John

                          "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
                          ______________
                          My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

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                          • Ope-Dog.... after a little web searching I found the seller of that peel where I bought it. go here:
                            Once on the site hit "SHOP NOW".....On the top menu of the page that opens.....the last section is "Peels"... click on that. The site also has some great videos. Nice family that has the site. Good luck.
                            Last edited by UtahBeehiver; 05-30-2021, 05:11 PM. Reason: Direct links not allowed
                            John

                            "Success can be defined as moving from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm"- Churchill
                            ______________
                            My Build Album: https://photos.app.goo.gl/mYnNG6wjn3VAUqkK6

                            Comment


                            • Thank you John! I appreciate your follow-up answers! Very kind to take the time and research that. I'll give the site a look!

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