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Pizza Bob's 42" Build

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Here is one done by a member but you need to have access to a welder. There have been several non weld versions done by members but you have to do a search, ie look for IT

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  • Dzerocool
    replied
    Anyone have the steps on making the radius tool?

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  • George_M
    replied
    Hi Bob,
    Do you mean like mine?
    https://community.fornobravo.com/for...088#post390088

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  • pizza_bob
    replied
    Has anyone tried a larger floor bricks? I'm wondering if it's possible to remove enough bricks to insert four larger refractory sections that form a circle - obviously smaller diameter than current 42" diameter. Thoughts or suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • pizza_bob
    replied
    Originally posted by cnegrelli View Post
    Bob - I know it's been awhile, but I'm hoping you check from time to time. There's some similarities with your enclosure and what I'm trying to design. Both have a hipped roof that is flat on top. Is your roof pitched? What is the material and is it a solid piece or pieces that are mortared? I realize your chimney comes out the top of that, but how is it surrounded?
    Hello cnegrelli,
    It's been quite some time since I've logged in here. I would think you are beyond this part of your build? If not, let me know and I'll get a few pictures of the top of the oven.

    Leave a comment:


  • cnegrelli
    replied
    Bob - I know it's been awhile, but I'm hoping you check from time to time. There's some similarities with your enclosure and what I'm trying to design. Both have a hipped roof that is flat on top. Is your roof pitched? What is the material and is it a solid piece or pieces that are mortared? I realize your chimney comes out the top of that, but how is it surrounded?

    Leave a comment:


  • Lars
    replied
    Sure, they are standard firebricks . The tightness of the arc is achieved by your choice of angle at the center of each brick.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    The thread is quite old with the last post in 2014 so you may not get a response.

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  • George_M
    replied
    Originally posted by pizza_bob View Post
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    Made some progress yesterday. I cut and dry stacked the landing arch walls and reveal. The first and third courses of the vertical landing walls are mitered and tie in to the dome and reveal blocks. This should make it more sturdy and it eliminates a continuous mortar joint. I also decided to take some time (waste some time?) tapering the oven opening arch bricks. Really simple to cut on the HF tile saw and they came out really clean. I still have a couple more to cut and then I'll start mortaring them in place. I'm not sure if I'll do this for the other arch bricks but we'll see...

    ~Bob
    Hi bob,
    I will my entrance arc like yours.
    Can you tell me please the size of the bricks on the arc?
    Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Campmaki
    replied
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    Originally posted by pizza_bob View Post
    Dino,
    That sounds like a good way to tie the bricks in. Thank you for the detailed pictures!

    I picked-up the rest of my firebricks yesterday and was a little disappointed with the quality of the bricks. I can't believe how chipped the edges/corners are! Are there different grades of firebrick? It seems as if these bricks chip so easily. Perhaps the buff bricks chip easier than red??? Who knows...

    This weekend I'll build the form for the inner arch and set-up my "indispensible tool". I ordered parts from McMaster Carr and built an adjustable "indispensible tool". I was planning on a 19" dome height and this should help.

    Rain, rain go away!

    ~Bob
    Bob , just wondering about your IT. Did you find the parts at a hardware store and what it the correct part name for the two pieces at the floor? The inner piece looks like a ball joint. Going to the store to dig into this. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • stonecutter
    replied
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    Originally posted by ATK406 View Post
    Wouldn't it be just as effective and easier to cut a series of grooves in the bottom of the brick as opposed to carving out a hollow (say 3/8" wide by 1/2" deep) that would allow the brick to settle in the setting bed? I understand with your skill set carving out the back of a brick to look like a frog or a squirrel or any other forest creature would be no problem , but some of us only have a few simple tools - like a brick saw.
    That was what I suggested...see bold below... though I never specified a depth.

    Originally posted by stonecutter View Post
    To create a space, you can 'frog' the brick....cut or grind a hollow in the center of the brick.......
    A frog in a brick is a hollow in the center , not a animal relief....funny guy. That would make for some interesting repair work.

    Leave a comment:


  • ATK406
    replied
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    Originally posted by stonecutter View Post
    To create a space, you can 'frog' the brick....cut or grind a hollow in the center of the brick, which will allow you to tap or push the brick into your setting bed without forcing material into the joint. Just before you set the replacement brick, rake the setting material away from the surrounding floor brick ( like a bevel)...this will further prevent it from squeezing up, and direct it into the frog.
    Wouldn't it be just as effective and easier to cut a series of grooves in the bottom of the brick as opposed to carving out a hollow (say 3/8" wide by 1/2" deep) that would allow the brick to settle in the setting bed? I understand with your skill set carving out the back of a brick to look like a frog or a squirrel or any other forest creature would be no problem , but some of us only have a few simple tools - like a brick saw.

    Bob,
    I'm so glad you raised your thread to the top. I don't know how I missed it. I caught the end of your thread and had to go back to the beginning and read the whole thing. Our oven constructions have a lot in common (albeit your dome to arch transition was a little more elegant than mine - but it all worked out in the end). Your story is truly one of the "classics". Congratulations on a beautiful back yard, patio and WFO and good luck with your brick replacement.

    Regards,
    AT

    Leave a comment:


  • pizza_bob
    replied
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    Thank you for your suggestions on this. I will make sure to take pictures of the process and let everyone know how I make out. The hearth bricks are not mortared in place so I'm hoping it will easily come out. I see my floor shifted around slightly but not too bad - I think I might have left a little more than 1/8" between the dome sidewall bricks and floor which might have caused bricks to shift ever so slightly.

    Kind Regards,
    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • stonecutter
    replied
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    It is easier to level out a larger area rather than a single brick gap. When the damaged brick is removed, take out a few around it, trowel out a sand/fireclay mix and reinstall.

    If that doesn't appeal to you, you have two options. Get the setting bed perfect or create a space for material to go under compression...because the floor is tight there is nowhere for the material to go, except to squeeze into the joint, which will lift the brick or prevent it from being leveled.

    To create a space, you can 'frog' the brick....cut or grind a hollow in the center of the brick, which will allow you to tap or push the brick into your setting bed without forcing material into the joint. Just before you set the replacement brick, rake the setting material away from the surrounding floor brick ( like a bevel)...this will further prevent it from squeezing up, and direct it into the frog.

    Leave a comment:


  • cobblerdave
    replied
    Re: Pizza Bob's 42" Build

    Originally posted by DaveW View Post
    Dave makes a good point that it could end up high. Maybe shave the bottom of the firebrick first. I don't think you want to grind the top, I've been down that road and as you know the bricks only have a thin hard surface. The rest of the brick is weak. My thought is you still will have your non-hardening mix underneath the bricks so a little refractory mortar will become part of the replacement brick. A wet mix will crack easily and relieve any tension but will be hard enough to keep the brick in place and wet enough to squeeze between bricks as you tap it down. Maybe keep pressure on neighboring bricks when setting the new one.

    Dave
    Gudday DaveW
    Click image for larger version

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    I only have my own oven to go on. I'm finding it hard to get a table knife blade in the gapes of the hearth tile. That why I suggested a thin wire . I would think it hard for any mortar to be able to squish up in that gape. Perhaps it depends on the size of the gape. I'm certain it wouldn't work on my hearth
    Regards dave

    Leave a comment:

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