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39 inch Corner Build

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Definitely! Wasn't sure how the first fire was going to go, but now that I have one under my belt something is gonna get cooked the during the next curing fire. .

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  • david s
    replied
    Try roasting a chicken for a couple of hours. It's a pity to waste the heat.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Thanks to you both for the words of caution - I read a bunch of the curing threads and understand the need to resist temptation. We had burgers for dinner and I so very badly wanted to get a nice bed of coals to cook our first meal, but went real slow and plan to do the same for the next few fires. I pretty much just used sticks and twigs (nothing much bigger than 1/2 inch) and kept the fire 6-8 inch in diameter.

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  • SableSprings
    replied
    Looks terrific JR! I do remember how good it felt after all that hard work to finally have a fire going in the cooking chamber. Remember not to go too fast with the curing fires...sorry, didn't mean to sound like a nag, but still...

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  • david s
    replied
    Just repeat the same procedure each day if possible. You will notice the black carbon burning off the roof of the dome and each subsequent fire will see it clear further down. Don't make the flame too vicious at this stage because the temperature difference between the top and the bottom will still be quite large.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    First fire! So much more work to do, but this sure felt good. After about 3 hours of slow burn the dome was ~300F and the first course was ~150F. Outside top of dome was about 115F. 4 hours after fire went out interior of dome is still @ 120F.

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  • Larry P
    replied
    Looks good JR. I'm probably a day behind you right now. Hope to burn this Saturday, you and me both!

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    I've been making some good progress on my chimney. Got it to the point where I needed to attach my supervent adapter plate. I debated using masonry anchors or just mortaring the adapter between two layers, but then I decided to go a different way - thru bolting. I worried that mortar alone might not be strong enough and putting anchors into firebrick might either pull out too easy or create too much (hoop) stress if in real tight and potentially crack the brick. I thought running a bolt all the way through the bricks would give me maximum strength and hopefully minimize the risk of cracking bricks due to thermal cycling. I made some "custom" bolts by sawing slots in the threaded ends, so I could tighten down my adapter plate without risk of the bolts spinning in their holes, and remove the nuts later if ever need to. I was worried about cracking the bricks while drilling but using a masonry bit and rotary hammer drill I didn't break a single one. I had a devil of a time keeping the holes on center though and that combined with difficulty mortaring the bricks in where the bolts would be in the right place means I will probably need to oversize or slot the holes in the adapter plate. I'll give the mortar a few days to set up then I will tackle mounting the plate. I'm really itching to get some curing fires going - maybe next weekend!

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Thanks - that is exactly what I was asking. In the picture I linked, the bricks looks so much like they were on the same plane that I thought you mortared them together in a square, then placed the "assembly" onto the chimney.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I not quite sure exactly what you are asking but let me take a stab. I build the chimney base brick by brick, then attached the anchor plate via masonry anchors. Then I installed another layer of brick as a cap (brick by brick) over the anchor plate. Here are some pics for the brick(s) on the cap looking at the bottom showing the recess I had to make in order for the bricks to fit over the anchor plate.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Question for Russell, in the photo from your album linked below, did you mortar these bricks together and attach the adapter as a sub-assembly and then mortar it on, or did you build it up directly on the chimney brick by brick.

    http://www.fornobravo.com/community/...photoid=291177

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  • david s
    replied
    Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
    [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_74430_1459089323471_146[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_31273_1459089335117_646[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]temp_45105_1459089342867_765[/ATTACH] JR,

    I can't say with expert proof that anchoring the vent plate to the lower brick is required but that is what I did the mortared a top layer brick cap over the plate. I has been going on 5-6 years of open exposure and I inspect every year and have not had any problems so far. I have about 4 feet of double wall SS vent pipe so I install the masonry anchors as insurance against wind load and to secure the anchor plate to the high temp. sealant under the plate.
    Masonary anchors would be better than screws, provided they are stainless.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Reading these responses I realized I have a problem that I had not anticipated. My structure over my oven is not very stiff, meaning I can create movement/oscillation in it if I rock one of the support pillars back and forth. I have to pull pretty hard, but the deflection is there. I think it is plenty strong, but am now worried about how small deflections may transmit themselves into my stove pipe. My spanwise boards/beams are not tied in to the structure yet, and I plan on adding two sides, so I think the opportunity to stiffen the structure is there, but I need to figure it out before I attach my pipe to the structure and penetrate the roof or I will run the risk of cracking whatever method I use to attach my anchor plate. With the plate being about 30" under the roof, small movements at the top will be magnified at the base, and I don't think the pipe/plate joint will allow much play and will transmit any movement into the mortar/attachment.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    JR,

    I can't say with expert proof that anchoring the vent plate to the lower brick is required but that is what I did the mortared a top layer brick cap over the plate. I has been going on 5-6 years of open exposure and I inspect every year and have not had any problems so far. I have about 4 feet of double wall SS vent pipe so I install the masonry anchors as insurance against wind load and to secure the anchor plate to the high temp. sealant under the plate.
    Last edited by UtahBeehiver; 03-27-2016, 07:37 AM.

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  • david s
    replied
    Originally posted by JRPizza View Post
    Thanks David. Are the extra holes you refer to drilling to allow the mortar to flow into and through them providing a better bond?
    Yes, exactly. They also prevent the tendency for delamitation there too. Remember that being steel the heat will rush to the more conductive material first, so probably make the holes fairly large.
    Last edited by david s; 03-27-2016, 01:17 AM.

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