Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Block Stand Question - Pompeii 42"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Block Stand Question - Pompeii 42"

    Hello,
    I finally got my outdoor kitchen concrete pads poured today, and getting ready to build my oven!

    I poured a 77x86 foundation per the plans I found on the forno bravo site. What I am confused on is for a dry stack how can you come up with the dimensions of
    69″ x 76″ when using 16" and 8" block (regardless if you use the 8", 16", or the actual dimensions of 5/8 less). I would assume this means you need to cut the block, but wondering if there is a easier way? Also, if you cut a block, its going to throw off the cores from lining up (I believe), which would make it hard to pour every other core full with a rerod all the way down?

    thanks!
    Yeager



  • #2
    The FB plans are a good baseline but you have discovered they are not perfect. Don't cut the CMUs to fit. Use whole or half units.
    Russell
    Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Russell!

      It looks like I can fit together a 5' 10 1/8" x 6' 5 3/4" block stand using actual block sizes drystacked together.

      After putting this together and designing the cooking surface it appears I might be able to increase the cooking surface to a 44" or even 46" oven (check out the attached image for the existing 42" layout showing that there appears to be a couple inches on each side of the oven available. Thoughts? I am planning on putting a roof over the dome (live in Minnesota!).

      thanks,
      Yeager

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a 42" and never run out of cooking space. In fact, I rarely cook more than two maybe three pizzas at a time since they cook so fast and it is hard to manage too many pizzas at a time. The larger the oven the more fuel required. It up to you but your current design is plenty big. IMHO. A cover over the oven will make it more accessible in the winter, mine is not covered and although I could do winter cooking I don't very oven. It also protects your oven better from rain/snow/freezing. I have had some freezing damage to my polished concrete top.
        Russell
        Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

        Comment


        • #5
          Cool - I am thinking about larger things like turkey's if the added cooking width and height would be of benefit? My foundation is poured, so if I don't make it bigger, I'll have some unused space between the oven dome and wall for roof ( not super bad thing, but might be worth leveraging?)

          any others out there make a 44 or 46" pompeii?

          Comment


          • #6
            Karangi Dude (I don't think his thread is active anymore) and "The_dr_masuess" aka Loren built 48", these ovens are massive. Loren just recently fired his up for a big party so contact him on the pros/cons of having a oven this size.
            Russell
            Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

            Comment


            • #7
              I've got a 44" oven. I love it. But, I built mine for "big feeds" in mind. And, I have what seems to be almost endless resources for free hardwood. It takes a lot of it. An oven that size is not needed for cooking a turkey. Three or four maybe. On this forum, I've seen some pics of some very fine birds cooked in 30" to 36" ovens.
              Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
              My Build
              My Web Album

              Comment


              • #8
                Couple other questions!

                1. For my block stand, the back row will be about 1.5" lower due to slope. To Level the first row was planning on using Type S mortar - is that what you'd recommend? (I am planning on drystacking the rest of the rows per the instructions.

                2. Oven height - I am estimating with the default plans that the oven entrance will be around 40". That seems a little low (bending over a lot). Have others added in a 5th row of 8" block to raise it up? Are there downsides?

                3. Has anyone given thought to creating an opening on the back side using angle iron also if that was accessible? The storage underneath is so deep I would think it would be difficult to get things from way back.

                thanks,
                Yeager

                Comment


                • #9
                  1 I would get the rear bed joint down to a half inch, if possible. I've used brick splits, slate, ceramic tile, and even asbestos shingles to build up sloping footers. A half inch split laid in a 1/2 inch bed of mortar will get you pretty close.

                  2. I see a lot of advice given for the oven floor to be about elbow height to the primary user. Mine is about 4" higher than that. I wouldn't want it any lower.


                  3. We've seen a good many H shaped stands for that very reason. It allows access from the front and also from the back without having to crawl inside with the critters. There have also been carts and drawers installed to make this area a little more ergonomic to reach. Another thing to think about is the slope that you mentioned. If water can enter your wood storage in the front, it will pool in the back.
                  Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
                  My Build
                  My Web Album

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For the rear bed joint (and some of the sides) it slopes from 0 to 1.5". I did some google searches on "brick splits" and they appear to be 1 1/4" typically. I would assume these would provide help for 1 1/4" gap to 1 1/2" gap, but what should I do for the 1/2" to 1 1/4" gap? Are we concerned about spaulting with the mortar mix at 1 1/2"? Is that why you suggest getting another material in there? (I would assume we're trying to get some mortar mix above/below the object to help fill in? I have 12x12 ceramic tile, but not sure if I cut them to 7 5/8" width if they are what you'd be recommending? I could place them down and get 1/2 inch mortar and 1/4 inch tile = 3/4 lift. Am I on the right track?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm sorry, I should have written brick "flooring" splits. They are usually 1/2" thick. The ceramic tile will work. You are on the right track. I would be surprised if they are as thin as 1/4" though. But, even if they are, a couple of runs of the tile should get up to near level in the lowest spot. I'm figuring 1/2" for the first bed joint, a layer of tile, another 1/2" bed joint and then the second run of tile. Since you will be running out to nothing in places, don't sweat getting the bed joints perfect. 1/2 to 3/4" is ok. I just wouldn't go an inch thick the full length of a block. You can cut the tile the full width of the block or cut them in 2" strips and space them the width of the block. Filling half of your cores with concrete will fill under the rest of the block that is not sitting in a bed of mortar.
                      Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
                      My Build
                      My Web Album

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I found some brick splits (about 1/2") this weekend at a brickyard. I explained my situation to the city desk guy there and he suggested setting up a frame, mixing up a polymer fortified self leveling, and pouring it down. This actually sounds easier and would appear to make it ready for blocks to set on top of and go - but thought I'd run it by this group! I didn't start anything yet (other than the poured slab!) as I had to get the rest of the project ready for Pavers to be installed this week.

                        thanks,
                        Yeager

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would check the bag of the product that you are going to use. It will have a recommended maximum thickness. It would probably work just fine, even if it is a little over the max. Just expensive! But, I guess, buying splits for the job would be expensive also.
                          Joe Watson, "A year from now, you will have wished that you had started today"
                          My Build
                          My Web Album

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Yeager...I'm just finishing up a 33" build in Minneapolis. Congrats on starting! Looking forward to the progress. MrChipster told me early on that while the plans are good, they are somewhat outdated compared to the WFO technology that has emerged through the builds and comments on this forum.
                            George

                            See my build thread here.

                            See my build album here.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hey All,
                              Making good progress on my block stand - filled the every other cores today on the block. Getting ready to form and pour the concrete and insulating pad next. What is the "latest" that everyone believes is the best way to insulate between the (3.5") concrete pad and the firebrick? Is it the vermiculite/perlite mixture or stone that can be purchased?

                              Also, since I am going to have a roof build around my dome, should I make it easy for myself and ensure that the surrounding ~4" is concrete so I can mount the steel studs to it?

                              thanks,
                              Yeager

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X