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My kinda Quebec build

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  • My kinda Quebec build

    At long last Iíve begun construction on my oven. I wasnít sure if I should post my build here or in other oven types because it is a bit off the norm. It is a brick oven however and it is in a way styled after some of the ovens I used in Italy and saw in Pompeii. In appearance it will be most akin to a Quebec oven though I think those are mostly cob. In essence Iím trying to simplify the oven to its bare bones, a brick dome oven with no chimney and a low roof. Iím sure Iíll get questions about why I am omitting the chimney. Mostly it has to do with cost and complexity. Also I have built and worked with cob ovens that donít have chimneys and havenít had any issue with performance. My dome bricks are free secondhand firebricks. I will also be using some insulative fire bricks below the hearth. The hearth itself will be new firebrick. So far Iíve begun on my stacked stone base.


  • #2
    If you want to see a nice dry stack base, look at Stonecutters build. It is top notch. The oven you are describing is typically called a neopolitan style or low dome most common in the Naples/Pompeii area. You can economize your builds with repurpose materials but a critical component of a successful oven is insulation. IFBs under the floor is good, for your dome you can use a perlite or vermiculate/concrete mix 8-10 to 1 that will give you decent insulation and not the cost of high tech ceramic fiber insulation.

    https://community.fornobravo.com/for...od-fired-redux
    Last edited by UtahBeehiver; 06-29-2019, 06:20 AM.
    Russell
    Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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    • #3
      Stonecutters build was a great inspiration to me. My dry stack skills pale in comparison. I know just enough to realize some of my joints are shyte.

      For insulation thats precisely my plan. Iíll use some vermicrete to level out the ins. fire bricks then use probably 8-1 on the top.

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      • #4
        Vcrete does not have a lot of structural strength so are you talking using vcrete for you heath or are you talking a concrete hearth with vcrete as a leveling material? 8 to 1 is good on top of the dome but not under the floor. You can level you IFB with a slurry of sand and fire clay installed with a 1/2" notched trowel on top of a concrete hearth.
        Russell
        Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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        • #5
          Sorry. To clarify Iím talking about using 5-1 vcrete to level out the lumps and bumps of my eroded insulating fire brick. On top of that I will use the sand and fire clay slurry to set fire bricks for my hearth. Then over the brick dome I will use 8-1 to insulate. So I have it clear, what is the ratio of fire clay to sand when making that setting ďmortarĒ?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by UtahBeehiver View Post
            If you want to see a nice dry stack base, look at Stonecutters build. It is top notch. The oven you are describing is typically called a neopolitan style or low dome most common in the Naples/Pompeii area. You can economize your builds with repurpose materials but a critical component of a successful oven is insulation. IFBs under the floor is good, for your dome you can use a perlite or vermiculate/concrete mix 8-10 to 1 that will give you decent insulation and not the cost of high tech ceramic fiber insulation.

            https://community.fornobravo.com/for...od-fired-redux
            Yea......that dude has some mad skills!!

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            • #7
              1 to 1 peanut butter consistency with a 1/2" notched trowel. Like setting ceramic tiles.
              Russell
              Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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              • #8
                Awesome, thanks!

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                • #9
                  Well it ainít going anywhere...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Slab done and hearth down. Even got a bit done on the dome.

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                    • #11
                      You talked about insulating fire brick under the floor firebrick, I do not see them unless they are covered by the floor. The floor needs to be isolated or sitting on insulation so the floor and the dome heat do not transmit out the the concrete hearth acting as a heat sink.
                      Russell
                      Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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                      • #12
                        Theyíre down there and covered by the floor and also by a thin layer of perlecrete to level them out. I just didnít take great photos of that phase.

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                        • #13
                          Sounds like you have it covered.
                          Russell
                          Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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                          • #14
                            I donít know about that . Trying not to cut too many corners though.

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                            • #15
                              Good and efficient builds can be accomplish with budget or material restraints. Gulf and I are the master repurposers on the forum. Both of our builds utilized a fair amount of repurposed materials. Although we both did use high tech insulation but a v or pcrete dome insulation will do a job as well, just takes more thickness to insulate as well as ceramic blanket. Are you considering a tapered inner arch? This type of arch make the dome to tie-in much easier. But I see you are partially cutting the bricks the breaking them or using a brick chisel to cut. These methods will limit your ability to do a taper inner arch.
                              Russell
                              Google Photo Album [https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...JneXVXc3hVNHd3/]

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