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42 Pompeii in San Felipe, MX

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Most CaSi board will readily absorb water. This is one of the reasons elevating the boards off the hearth, ie foamglas, ceramic tiles, pavers, and placing weep holes in the hearth is suggested. Wet board will dry out eventually. Wet CaSi or AlSi (FB) is one of the most common issues with poor heat retention in ovens.

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Originally posted by modified9v View Post
    As for the fiber board getting wet. This stuff I got from our sponsor sucks up water like a sponge. We had a little snaffu with the washing machine drain and flooded the garage floor. Of course I had some of the fiber board I was planning on using for my door. It nearly doubled in size. I then got some wet by mistake that had some bricks sitting on it... the bricks sunk into the board... I didn’t even get it that wet. It was mist from the wet saw. You can see why I’m hesitant to let it get very wet at all. The next time I’m in the States I will pick up some Red Guard to help seal around any exposed fiber board.
    Oh wow, I didn't realize it would do that. The board that I bought locally actually pools water so I didn't have to worry about that..

    Click image for larger version

Name:	water on board.jpg
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  • modified9v
    replied
    Thanks again!!! Yes, it can be very dry here. We have had a spell with no rain for a long time. It’s so dry that the flies and honey bees will do anything for water. I have fly traps set and they still drive me crazy. Stung by bees twice yesterday on my foot. Ughhh!!! I will also note that the humidity here can be unbearable for a few months (85%+) but it is dried up again. Today we have winds out of the north at 20 kph. I had to take down my easy-up.

    Attached are the pics of the arch bricks laid only 20 minutes ago. You can see how wet the top ones are. The bottom bricks were moist when I set the uppers but not nearly as wet as they are now. They are sucking the wet right outta the mortar. I will keep it damp today as long as I can then cover it.

    As for the fiber board getting wet. This stuff I got from our sponsor sucks up water like a sponge. We had a little snaffu with the washing machine drain and flooded the garage floor. Of course I had some of the fiber board I was planning on using for my door. It nearly doubled in size. I then got some wet by mistake that had some bricks sitting on it... the bricks sunk into the board... I didn’t even get it that wet. It was mist from the wet saw. You can see why I’m hesitant to let it get very wet at all. The next time I’m in the States I will pick up some Red Guard to help seal around any exposed fiber board.

    I’m gonna let these arch bricks set till this afternoon before I go near them. I’m planning to prep the next 2 sets of arch bricks tonight and set them tomorrow. I will report back when I know.

    Thanks again, Mikie V.

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Originally posted by modified9v View Post

    Today I will do a small run and soak the crap out of them.... also, after they are set I will keep them moist. I’ve been trying to to use to much water to keep from getting my fiber board wet... it hates water.
    Let me know how it works for you, I imagine it can be pretty difficult to keep enough moisture in your brickwork in such a dry environment! I didn't worry too much about my board getting wet while doing my build knowing it would dry out during the curing fires.
    Last edited by slschoming; 10-10-2019, 08:03 AM.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    Thank you Slschoming for the input... my consistency of the mortar has been what I consider really wet. It will stick to the trowel, but just barely. I could probably go a bit wetter. When I make mortar I use a Red Solo cup... 3 cups sand to 1 cup lime, Portland and fire clay. I can lay about 5 bricks and have a bit left over that I had been putting on the fiber board to protect it. As far as how much water, well, I mix water in until it will just stay on a trowel. It’s pretty wet. I find that the instant the mortar hits the brick it starts to soak in real fast. So fast that I have very little time to work the brick down into place. I thought that was a good thing. You know, the mortar sucking the bricks together. Obviously too quick. With the heat and wind here I think that everything drys really fast. For instance, clothing that is on the clothesline is dry in 15 minutes.

    Before I lay a brick I clean and soak them, but then they will typically sit in the sun. I believe they are bone dry when I set them. I do dampen all contact areas before applying mortar, but it’s not much... I can watch the moisture disappear before my very eyes.

    Today I will do a small run and soak the crap out of them.... also, after they are set I will keep them moist. I’ve been trying NOT to use to much water to keep from getting my fiber board wet... it hates water.

    Thanks for the very helpful reply and also enjoy the documentation of you build

    Mikie V.
    Last edited by modified9v; 10-10-2019, 09:29 AM.

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  • slschoming
    replied
    What is the consistency of your mortar?

    I live in a more humid climate than you, and I would still soak my bricks until they were done bubbling and would wait to pull them out of the bucket until I was good and ready to butter them with mortar (peanut butter consistency). I kept the garden hose with a mist attachment nearby and would mist EVERYTHING between batches of mortar.

    Also, I only mixed enough mortar to lay about 8 bricks at a time. You might want to do even smaller batches in a dryer climate... When I mixed more than that it would start to flash before I got it all used, which is what I am thinking is happening to you. There is a point where the mortar is still sort of workable but it's not bonding well, and that's when I would have issues with the brick coming loose after you think it's set...

    Also, are you misting the finished part of your dome before laying new bricks? That's another place that can really suck the moisture out of your mortar.

    I also tried to keep it damp for at least 24-48 hours (3 days is preferable) after mortaring anything...

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  • modified9v
    replied
    Little bit bummed out on how things are progressing. I set the next set of inner arch bricks and about 45 minutes afterward I decided to mark the next set to measure with the IT and then cut them. We I barely bumped the one on the left and knocked it loose. I then looked at the right side and basically picked it up off the one it was mortared to. I’m not at all pleased with the cracking on the large mortar gaps either... pictures are attached.

    I’ve tried short soak, long soak, no soak and just a spritz of fresh clean water. All bricks get a short soak with a good scrub with a brush. I rinse them in the same water I clean them in... maybe that’s the problem, I don’t know.

    In hind sight, I’m kinda glad I have to re-set them. They were not as straight as I would have liked... but I was going to live with it and adjust on the next few arch bricks as I went up. So, not a great loss. I do know that I have to get this arch moving up before I can work the rings much more.

    Speaking of the rings or courses, I think I’m going to have to start wedge cutting them to reduce the mortar gap if I ever want to stop having these monster cracks. These cracks only appear at the wide gaps. Looking at the thin gaps, there is no cracking... but, there is the fact that the bricks I just laid basically popped right off. Maybe I should set them and not go near them until they are good and dry???

    Thoughts???

    Thank you, Mikie V.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    I love the storm door idea... certainly don’t want the undesirables doing the unspeakable in there. Probably be nice to have a way to close off the flue too. We have a bit of a honey bee issue here. They will start a hive anywhere.maybe a simple screen.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    That is a nice keystone. But, If I were going to copy it, I would raise it up to match the reveal. That way a storm door can be easily fitted for the oven. I included a storm door to protect the oven from wind driven rain. Since then I have found other good reasons to include one. I came out one very cold morning to find a feral cat laying in the entry up against my inuslated door . I had to treat the entry with a good sanitizing fire . Another time, it was bird droppings. Same treatment. Needless to say, the storm door is in place at all tmes now when the oven is not in use.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    Now that is custom.. Pretty cool. I did make another template for the door in case I destroy this one taking it out. I imagine it’s a real pain in the neck to make a door without that template.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Keystones are typically at least the same size as the adjacent arch bricks and lots of time larger.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	key.JPG Views:	0 Size:	29.9 KB ID:	417025 Since you said your keystone is going to be custom, I want to see one like this.

    PS save the arch form, it will be used a a template for your oven door.
    Last edited by UtahBeehiver; 10-06-2019, 11:29 AM.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    OK... will tighten it up. Amazing how quickly the mortar gaps add up. Thanks!!!

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I would makes some mortar thickness adjustments so the keystone at least matches the size of the rest of the arch at least from an aesthetics point of view. Structurally there is not an issue.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    OK... getting closer.I the attached picture the gaps are 3/16” cardboard and I’m left with an opening for the keystone of 1 3/16”. That is a pretty narrow keystone once I account for the mortar. Is that a problem? I could shoot for tighter gaps like say an 1/8” or try and go ZERO gap at template...? Thoughts? I think no matter what I will be cutting a custom keystone once I get there.

    Thanks, Mikie V.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    Thanks Russell... I kinda already screwed up and have my adjustment bricks straight in view (2 so far). I hope it doesn’t happen again. I will go one ring with the shiny side in just for giggles. I will stick with the 13.25. I need to shave a .25 off of the template to get there and that is no big deal as I have a bit of a wobble (one leg is a tad short).

    Mikie V.
    Last edited by modified9v; 10-05-2019, 02:45 PM.

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