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42 Pompeii in San Felipe, MX

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    I did not mortar my landing bricks to my vent arch, but also built the vent upon my insulation board. I have sort of resigned myself to the fact I might have to repair the arch and hopefully it won't develop a structural crack. At least your crack does not look like it is any load path and is just a result of selective settling of the heavier arch relative to the lighter "floating" floor.

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  • deejayoh
    replied
    I had a crack in my arch after firing - it was in the top, not bottom - but it was pretty easy to just knock out the offending brick and remortar. Looks like you could easily do that here.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    OK... here is the crack. It is getting bigger after every firing. This crack is wide enough that a quarter would fit in it. This crack runs the length of the joint between outer arch and the landing. It’s as if the weight of the arch is compressing the ceramic fiber board under it which, in turn, sheared the joint. The weight of the arch is so much greater than the weight of the landing. When I inspect all the joints of the outer arch I find no cracks at all... so it’s kinda like the leaning tower of Pisa (no pun intended).

    Way back in my build the corner of the fiber board got wet because the tarp tore in the spot during a major storm.

    I’m curious what what other builder would do, if anything with this crack. I was wanting to put a decorative tile on the face of the bricks of the landing... I wanted to extend that line of tile all the way to the bottom arch brick, but if I do I know that the grout line will crack over time as this crack gets bigger.

    Thanks for your attention.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    Thanks Jr. Yes, the stainless “C” channel is removable. It actually sits on 2 specially cut bricks that I’ve already trimmed once. I took them down so that the stainless was more or less flush with the landing and floor... I can shave them a little bit more and see what happens next time. Also there is a little bit of mortar protruding that I can carefully shave off with the angle grinder if needed. I’d rather not hit them with the grinder for fear of causing yet another crack.

    Speaking of cracks, man... I’ve got a monster. I’m gonna take a picture of it and see what kinda of feedback on whether or not anything should be done about it. It’s getting bigger!!!

    One last thing, I had some over-proofed dough balls left from the party. I took them out of the fridge and formed them into loaves... came out amazing. My wife wants me to make a batch just for bread... I will do that but tweak the recipe as I felt it was too salty for bread. Perfect crust and crumb... IMHO it’s better than my hearth bread. I doubled my sour dough starter ingredient amount and it’s got that perfect aroma.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    If the mortar joint is projecting out beyond the edges of the bricks it should not hurt to hit those spots with a grinder. If your door is binding on brick you'll have to decide whether to grind on the bricks a little or scrap your door. I had my door stick after I removed my landing bricks to clean them in the oven. Had to vacuum out the area close and hand select bricks that were a little lower. Along those lines, if your door sits on your stainless channel is might be possible to lower it ever so slightly to relieve the pressure, depending on how it is attached and if it is removable.

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  • modified9v
    replied
    OHHHHH Nooooooo.... The door was stuck. Seems I don’t have enough clearance for my door. This was yesterday afternoon. Finally this morning it came loose. Oven temp is exactly 400f on the deck and dome.

    I can see two spots on the door that are hitting on mortar joints... do you think it’s ok to take a grinder to the areas that are hitting the door or should I have a new door made a little smaller? I can’t grind on the door as it is thin gauge stainless.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Yes, a good tight fitting door makes all the difference when it comes to retaining moisture. We usually cook up a chicken or two every time we fire the oven, along with whatever other meat we roast. Food for a week!

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  • MarkJerling
    replied
    Originally posted by modified9v View Post
    Been awhile since I’ve posted. I’ve attached 3 pictures from our party last night. We hosted a cornhole/pizza party and had 30 people over. What a blast. One picture is of the new door fresh from a friend of mine that is a shop foreman at a fabrication shop in California. I sent him via snail mail a template and he brought this down to Mexico for me.

    The oven was actually a little too hot last night and pizzas were coming out in about 60 seconds... too fast to work multiple pies at one time. The done was 1200f and the floor was 825f... I tried to let it cool a bit and found myself mopping the deck between pies but it was a struggle. They tasted amazing. This was the first time I used only mesquite wood from start up to finish... man, that stuff burns hot, hot, hot.

    The one picture of the finished pizza is what we call the Quattro. It’s a simple 4 cheese pizza. Mozzarella, Provolone, Asiago and Gorgonzola... EVO base, garlic and freshly ground pepper corns. I made 5 of them.

    This morning the oven temp is 600f... floor is 575f and the dome is 680f. Thinking I’ll make a few dough balls and make a few clam pies for me and the Mrs. for lunch.

    I still have plans to cover the oven with a structure of some sort... haven’t worked out the details yet. Too busy using the oven.

    Today I will start proofing dough for bread that I will bake tomorrow and then the next day we will slow cook a roast... I will use the oven to dry some of the herbs from the garden this coming weekend.

    Life is good.
    Looking lovely. Good heat retention!

    Leave a comment:


  • modified9v
    replied
    I hear ya on the roasting of meats. Even though I just got the door we’ve done a few roasts... did a killer prime rib for Christmas and a few tri-tips. So good. Before the door I had to stack bricks in front of the arch. Haha... tried a plywood door for a minute but it was ashes the next morning. I’ve got one of those Bluetooth thermometers from Meter... I can relax on my recliner and wait for the alert on my iPad. Very cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRPizza
    replied
    That's some great heat retention! You are going to love roasting in the oven - everything comes out so moist. I love it when I pull the door off and the steam and smells come pouring out!

    Leave a comment:


  • modified9v
    replied
    Been awhile since I’ve posted. I’ve attached 3 pictures from our party last night. We hosted a cornhole/pizza party and had 30 people over. What a blast. One picture is of the new door fresh from a friend of mine that is a shop foreman at a fabrication shop in California. I sent him via snail mail a template and he brought this down to Mexico for me.

    The oven was actually a little too hot last night and pizzas were coming out in about 60 seconds... too fast to work multiple pies at one time. The done was 1200f and the floor was 825f... I tried to let it cool a bit and found myself mopping the deck between pies but it was a struggle. They tasted amazing. This was the first time I used only mesquite wood from start up to finish... man, that stuff burns hot, hot, hot.

    The one picture of the finished pizza is what we call the Quattro. It’s a simple 4 cheese pizza. Mozzarella, Provolone, Asiago and Gorgonzola... EVO base, garlic and freshly ground pepper corns. I made 5 of them.

    This morning the oven temp is 600f... floor is 575f and the dome is 680f. Thinking I’ll make a few dough balls and make a few clam pies for me and the Mrs. for lunch.

    I still have plans to cover the oven with a structure of some sort... haven’t worked out the details yet. Too busy using the oven.

    Today I will start proofing dough for bread that I will bake tomorrow and then the next day we will slow cook a roast... I will use the oven to dry some of the herbs from the garden this coming weekend.

    Life is good.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chach
    replied
    "Disgusting" hahhah love it. I am a traditionalist as well. Glad it was successful.

    Ricky

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I forgot to tell ya, the small draft fire I do is a top down fire. Here is a super mega version of a top down fire I saw at Jack Daniels in Lynchburg Tn, 30 Click image for larger version

Name:	making-charcoal.jpg
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ID:	422589 years ago but it is for making charcoal. When I went there it was a dry county (has since changed) but at the end of the tour they gave us a choice of tasting yellow label or black label which much to my dismay turned out to be lemonade or coffee.....LOL

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  • modified9v
    replied
    I hear ya Ricky... I have got to pick up some gloves. As far as the pizza... the one in the picture is not something i would ever do. I asked one of the guests to make what he wanted. I’m a bit of a pizza snob and stick to traditional ingredients. This one had ranch dressing as a sauce with pepperoni, pineapple and mozzarella... kinda disgusting. Ahahaha. Everyone had a blast. And I love my lost and found after a party.

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  • Chach
    replied
    Pizzas look very tasty. Yes , you will not need to ok wax those arms when using the oven and no gloves. LOL. I have welder gloves that go up your forearm. I don't use them often but have it helps a lot but you can't leave your hand in there super long as the leather gets hot as well but shields you from hell created inside.

    Ricky

    Leave a comment:

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