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Mongo's 42" CT Build

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  • Dr.Lee
    replied
    Thanks very much for the detail.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Lee, I tried adding a photo to the previous post but could not. Here's a shot from below...the 8" round from the anchor plate in the ~8-1/2" square throat. The 8-1/2" is a bit of an estimation, I just wanted the throat opening to be slightly larger than the anchor plate round to maintain a little lateral play for locating the actual chimney dead-center on the arch.
    Last edited by mongota; 09-15-2020, 07:33 AM.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr.Lee View Post
    Can you tell me the approximate dimensions of the throat on your vent arch? I've been looking at the photos of the throat on page 6 of the build and counting bricks but I am unsure about the length of the partial bricks I see. Thanks - Lee
    I used an 8" ID chimney pipe. The chimney anchor plate I used has an ~8" round running vertically through the horizontal anchor plate. The portion of the round that extends below the plate sits inside the square opening of the throat. I made the throat slightly larger than the round, so the opening in the throat itself is maybe 8-1/2" square.

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  • Dr.Lee
    replied
    Can you tell me the approximate dimensions of the throat on your vent arch? I've been looking at the photos of the throat on page 6 of the build and counting bricks but I am unsure about the length of the partial bricks I see. Thanks - Lee

    Leave a comment:


  • mongota
    replied
    Thanks! I need to get my door pics posted.

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  • CapePizza
    replied
    Your project turned out very nice, Mongo. I like the stone work. Those columns are also pretty nice.

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  • mongota
    replied
    No progress, just an update, I just don't think I ever posted any overall shots of the oven with the stone work done. Here are a couple; front and back.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Thanks Barry.

    For me, building an oven was a learning experience, in some ways a circular one. I started at the beginning of the build asking a lot of questions, and by the time I was done, I'm now answering those from others.

    It's the circle of pizza.

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  • Baza
    replied
    WOW!
    Absolutely amazing Mongo!
    Love following the developments and incredibly creativity you are sharing with us!
    As one just barely hanging on to a simple build - your work is inspiring (so is your help and support of others!)

    Keep up the awesome work!
    Barry

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by Ope-dog View Post

    If you don't mind me asking, your bricks don't seem to be the typical tan color that most tend to use. I have been researching bricks here in the NW (Portland / Vancouver) region. A have found a supplier of firebrick, however was wondering why yours seem to have more of a "clay-brick-from-home-deeeepo" color? I noticed you mentioned firebrick and how fast they absorb water, so wasn't sure if there was a red brick available someplace or if they are indeed a clay brick from a box store?
    Greetings Ope-dog,

    My bricks are from a masonry yard the next town over, and they are indeed firebrick, full sized, 9" x 4.5" x 2.5", and weight a little over 7lbs each. The yard stocked two colors of brick, the buff color you referred to as well as the red ones. I simply chose red.

    I look forward to following your build.

    Best, Mongo

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  • Ope-dog
    replied
    Hi Mongo, I am fairly new to the site and have read through your build and beehiver's in depth! Some great info and a LOT of hard work. Frankly, there is a TON of hard work by most on this site. And I'm sure my upcoming build will be no different. :-)

    If you don't mind me asking, your bricks don't seem to be the typical tan color that most tend to use. I have been researching bricks here in the NW (Portland / Vancouver) region. A have found a supplier of firebrick, however was wondering why yours seem to have more of a "clay-brick-from-home-deeeepo" color? I noticed you mentioned firebrick and how fast they absorb water, so wasn't sure if there was a red brick available someplace or if they are indeed a clay brick from a box store?

    I can't say enough for your craftsmanship and patience. It has definitely paid off. Looking forward to starting my build and getting ideas. With all the great minds on this forum, I will look to post pics soon and make sure I don't go too astray too soon!

    Leave a comment:


  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris inPA View Post
    mongota. looking over your build I believe that you did a layer of red guard and no weep holes. Am I correct?

    I loved your ideas for the stone vernier and poured columns. Enough so that I'm doing that for my build.
    Correct, no weep holes. The 'four corners' of my hearth slab are exposed to the elements, I didn't want the slab to saturate and for water to wick up in to the insulation from underneath. My shell (brick dome, insulation, stucco and Thoroseal for waterproofing) had been in place for a couple of winters now, and I've had zero moisture issues inside the dome. I don't see any problem including weep holes. I just never incorporated them. I felt I could always add them later if needed by drilling up from underneath.

    Glad you were able to take some inspiration from my build details. I hope you enjoy your build as much as I have enjoyed mine.

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  • Chris inPA
    replied
    mongota. looking over your build I believe that you did a layer of red guard and no weep holes. Am I correct?

    I loved your ideas for the stone vernier and poured columns. Enough so that I'm doing that for my build.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chach
    replied
    Nice, I use a similar product called penetrox and no-lox for attaching dis-similar metals at work such as aluminum cable to copper Buss bar. Good stuff just don't get it on you or your hands it's hard to get off.

    Ricky

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by Chach View Post

    very nice ingenuity but just keep in mind that the pipe will rust eventually and possibly leach rust stains on your veneer.

    Ricky
    Knew I had a picture somewhere. I posted the previous last night from my phone.

    Prior to installation I cleaned the nipple, painted it it with rustoleum type paint. Mortared it in. Then gave it additional paint. The male and female threads that engage were not painted, they were treated with Penetrol. Penetrol protects the metal from oxidation, but doesn't really result in a mil thickness build up like paint does. That way the cap can still be easily threaded on and off.

    Best to all, Mongo

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