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Mongo's 42" CT Build

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  • mongota
    replied
    Got the cast arch out of the form the next day. Wire brushed the surface for a bit of rustic texture.

    Lifted it up to see how it fit...fit was good, so I mixed up a small amount of mortar and wet set it.

    Not sure if this will happen...But see the last photo with the red line under the arch. After this cast arch cures for a few more weeks, I might sink a couple of anchors and attach a steel plate to the underside of the "Keystone" area of the arch below top dead center. Gapped maybe 1/4" away from the arch. Perhaps to act as a heat shield of sorts. I'll shoot some temps the next time I fire it up and see how hot that area gets. It's mostly a concern during the initial fire, when the fire is built under the chimney.

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  • mongota
    replied
    I switched gears a few times regarding the dimensions of the front arch. It's decorative.

    Originally I was only going to clad the dome itself in stone. But when I decided to also clad the landing tunnel in stone, I increased the width of the arch's legs so its width would cover the edge of the stone veneer behind it. It's wider than I want it to be, and the shape is not exactly what I wanted, but it will serve its purpose.

    I had a piece of 1x4 PVC trim, I resawed it into 5/16 x 4, they flexed nicely to accommodate the curves in the arch form.

    I added a couple of pieces of #4 rebar, wired tied together.

    The volume of the form came out to just over a cubic foot, so I used two bags of concrete mix and some colorant.

    Beat the form to vibrate it a bit, after the water bled off I gave it a hard trowel and put it to bed for the night.

    Last edited by mongota; 10-13-2020, 12:22 PM.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Next up, casting the front arch.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Took a section of hardware cloth and tapconed it to the hearth slab. Necessary? Probably not.

    Calculations came out to a little over a cubic foot, so I mixed two 80lb bags of concrete mix and added colorant. On the photo caption I wrote 'bags of mortar". Nope. It's concrete.

    Filled the form, vibrated it until I couldn't stand it any more, struck the surface with a wood float, and let it sit until the water bled off. Came back then and did a hard steel trowel.

    Wrecked the form, gave the edges a light wire brushing, and I'll call this one done.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Time to cast some concrete. First, the form.

    This piece will be cast in place, the entry shelf. I recycled the same PVC as I used for the edge detail on the dome slab, just had to cut them down a bit. Two pieces of PVC, one piece is a quarter round ripped from 2" Sch40 PVC pipe, the larger half round is ripped from 4" PVC. Easy to construct, and it gives something a little different in the world of concrete.
    Last edited by mongota; 10-13-2020, 12:20 PM.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by Mongo View Post
    While reading through the forum during my build I saw a few references to a 'Mongo'. Nice to meet you.
    lol, you too!

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  • Mongo
    replied
    Well done! Those pilasters are impressive indeed. Great concrete work. While reading through the forum during my build I saw a few references to a 'Mongo'. Nice to meet you.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Stone veneer pretty much done. The back is done. The front, I need to cast a few decorative concrete items to trim out the entry, then I'll cover the vent arch with stone veneer.

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  • mongota
    replied
    I've had a version of this grinder for years. First one disappeared, this is its replacement. Usually use it for metal work. After mounting a 7-1/2" diamond blade that I usually use on a circular saw, it trims stone with ease. Didn't have to trim much, just a few to minimize mortar here and there.

    I'll lay out the stone dry, then mark the heck out of it for location and orientation. This way, after I pull them down and mix the mortar, I'm not standing there with a stone in one hand a trowel loaded with mortar in the other, trying to remember where the stone is supposed to go!

    Last pic shows the back side of the dome, roughly 3/4 done.
    Last edited by mongota; 08-13-2020, 01:50 PM.

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  • mongota
    replied
    fhausback,
    I have two coats of Thoroseal on the stucco. Thoroseal is waterproof, but vapor permeable. I also have a vent pipe at the apex of the dome.
    I had considered using a slip sheet between the stone and the stucco, but discarded that idea. I plan on adding a roof over everything.

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  • fhausback
    replied
    The stone looks great. Are you putting anything between the dome and the stone? sealers, etc...

    I'm thinking of doing an igloo with a brick veneer for the outside, and am thinking hard about how to waterproof the thing.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris inPA View Post
    Is your arch entirely of fire bricks? Or, did you use regular bricks for the end?
    Chris, the arch is all firebrick.

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  • Chris inPA
    replied
    Is your arch entirely of fire bricks? Or, did you use regular bricks for the end?

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  • Chach
    replied
    That stone work looks great so far. Stop second guessing yourself and go with it. We all critique our own work almost too much...you will know when something doesn't sit right and bothers you...most times the stone work looms kind of funky when your doing it but once you get to a certain point it starts to tie together. You have a very creative look going on and I am eager to see your finished oven.

    Ricky
    Last edited by Chach; 08-13-2020, 02:44 AM.

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  • SableSprings
    replied
    Welcome back from the brink... I'm completely sober (although it is after 5, I'll have to fix that after this post), and I think your stone work is looking fabulous. It's going to be a slow process to get the "best" fit, but it certainly will be worth the time based on what I see now. Your pictures posted just fine, so we'll all be looking forward to the next pics!

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