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Mongo's 42" CT Build

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  • You have made a remarkable oven, well done!

    My take on oven moisture: If it is fired once or twice a week, the oven heats more quickly, gets hotter, and stays hotter longer than when Moisture builds up from disuse.

    Firing the oven, even to an intermediate temperature goes a long way to controlling moisture. You can't get rid of a lot of moisture with just one firing cycle though. The solution is to use it more often. ;-)

    Keep in mind that wood contains at least 8-10% moisture, sometimes a lot more. This moisture makes a more moist heat than in your kitchen's oven. There are pluses to baking with that moisture given off by the firewood. JMO
    Lee B.
    DFW area, Texas, USA

    If you are thinking about building a brick oven, my advice is Here.

    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up.

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    • Originally posted by Lburou View Post
      You have made a remarkable oven, well done!

      My take on oven moisture: If it is fired once or twice a week, the oven heats more quickly, gets hotter, and stays hotter longer than when Moisture builds up from disuse.

      Firing the oven, even to an intermediate temperature goes a long way to controlling moisture. You can't get rid of a lot of moisture with just one firing cycle though. The solution is to use it more often. ;-)

      Keep in mind that wood contains at least 8-10% moisture, sometimes a lot more. This moisture makes a more moist heat than in your kitchen's oven. There are pluses to baking with that moisture given off by the firewood. JMO
      Agree with you completely, Lee.
      I've seen the same, with frequent firings the fire itself burns hotter, the oven heats up faster, and the dome clears more quickly. And the outside surface of the oven (in my case the stone dome veneer) never gets warm.
      After a period of non-use, all take longer, and the exterior stone veneer is slightly warm to the touch due to moisture drive.
      Mongo

      My Build: Mongo's 42" CT Stone Dome Build

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      • RedGard update...

        When I built my oven, I painted RedGard on my slab to prevent moisture in the slab from wicking up in to my 4" of floor board insulation. Once the insulation was set, on top of the RedGard, I then painted RedGard on the 4" edge of the insulation, as well as carrying a bit of it on to the top of the insulation at the landing. I'll try to attach a photo from way back when as pictures are always better than words. Especially when I'm writing the words.

        All told, the RedGard has performed marvelously. My oven has been in use for several years.

        Here in the New England, we've been hammered with rain over the past few weeks. The last storm a couple of nights ago dropped 7.4" in one night. It was pretty amazing.

        Before firing the oven up the other day, I pulled a few bricks up off of the landing just to see how the insulation looked underneath. All looked well. There have been a few questions regarding RedGard and how it holds up to temperature. In the photos below, the front row of bricks that make up the floor of the landing sit right on top of this RedGard. The landing is where I start my fires, so it has seen a bit of heat over the past several years.

        I'm happy to report that the RedGard looks just fine. It's intact. No tears. No degradation. No delamination from the insulation below. No bubbling. No defects at all that I can ascertain. I can press a thumbnail in it and it's still "rubbery" so to speak. With this being the part of the membrane most exposed to oven heat, this location would have taken the most abuse from high temperatures. And it looks great.

        That's all, folks!

        Mongo

        My Build: Mongo's 42" CT Stone Dome Build

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        • Thanks for that report, it’s good to know the Redguard stands up to the heat. Apart from keeping the moisture out, it is also important to provide an escape route rather than locking it in. This is of course weather dependant, but after torrential rain or even continuous high humidity the insulation can pick up considerable moisture. Some drain holes in the supporting slab provide an escape route for moisture as it travels away from the fire.
          My approach to preventing water wicking up from the stand is a little different in that I use a sealer on the top of the supporting piers and make the cast slab waterproof with both Xypex and Edencrete concrete additives which also increase strength.
          Kindled with zeal and fired with passion.

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          • Drain holes in the slab are always welcome. I'm grateful that I've never noted any moisture under mine, even when I taped squares of poly on the bottom of the slab. But you are right, build to prevent water from coming in, but provide a path for it to escape in case it does.

            And for anyone new reading this, for clarity by no means am I recommending RedGard on top of the entirety of the board insulation, and setting the OVEN floor firebricks directly on top of the RedGard. I wouldn't want any membrane directly under my oven floor bricks subjected to heat from a high temperature fire built in the center of the oven floor.
            Mongo

            My Build: Mongo's 42" CT Stone Dome Build

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