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42" build in McPherson KS

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Made some more pizza on Thursday night. The oven was still around 300 F this morning while I was doing my first coat of stucco. I didn't get all the chicken wire covered with the first coat, the stucco seemed to just squish right through. Should be able to cover it with the next coat. I cleaned my trowels/buckets and immediately fired up the oven and had some more pizza tonight, The still-wet stucco was cold to the touch all night while the oven was burning a hot 800 F.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Do you have a cap/cage or something similar to cover the vent as it sticks up to prevent it from being broken.......?
    No, I don't. But, (since the pvc bushing is anchored securely in the stucco) the weakest point is the threaded plastic on the vent's stem. If that does happen, I will just use an ease out tool to remove it and install a new vent. I'm at 7 years with the original vent.

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Thanks Gulf . Do you have a cap/cage or something similar to cover the vent as it sticks up to prevent it from being broken off by climbing children or falling branches? I'm sure I am overthinking this, but I do have a 6-year-old who climbs everything.

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  • Gulf
    replied
    Here you go.

    EDIT:

    I think that this configuration is a 1/2" to 3/4" pvc bushing. (1/2" to 1" would work) You just need to size the electrical conduit locknuts to fit the male threads. I used 1/2" flooring splits for my "brick veneer". I'm not sure what thickness brick that you will be using. However, 2 locknuts (one on each side of the wire mesh) can be used to adjust the heighth of the bushing to place it flush with the outside of the brick. Just thighten them down so that the bushing can not turn.

    If I understand your question (#2) correctly, I would not recess the vent. I use my vent year round. The vent cover is fairly small and it is hidden behind the chimney. So far, I haven't even had one person ask me about it. If you can not paint, stain, or otherwise camoflage the vent cover to your liking, take it out and cap the hole with a threaded plug after the oven is fully dry. After an extended period of unuse or you think that the oven has taken on some extra moisture, just remove the plug and reinstall the vent cover for a few firings.
    Last edited by Gulf; 10-17-2019, 06:32 PM.

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  • slschoming
    replied
    I spoke with a welder and sent one of my plywood templates and some measurements home with him. He is going to fabricate a stainless steel door around some leftover CalSil board for me.

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Gulf and UtahBeehiver

    Hey guys, I am hoping to start my stucco layer and I am not 100% sure what to do with the vent and have a few questions.

    1. Gulf, before the site got hacked you shared an image on here that has since disappeared that explained how to interface the pvc and vent with the mesh before applying the stucco. Could you share that image with me again?

    2. Can I place the vent so that the top of the vent is flush with the top of the surrounding brick veneer, or does it need to stick out a little higher? I am still having a hard time visualizing this. I don't want it to detract from the look of the rest of the oven but I also want a functioning vent for piece of mind.

    ​​​​​​​Thanks!

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  • mintee
    replied
    Aluminum doesn't belong in my kitchen. It's not as stable of a metal as stainless, and can pit and leech out compounds when introduced into an acidic environment. Also it turns a godawful color if used in a dishwasher with a caustic cleaner.

    Oh, and then there's the hydrogen gas. (Mostly kidding about this one.)

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Originally posted by Gulf View Post
    It's a long story but, I'm getting away from using aluminum in or around my oven.
    Why is that?

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  • slschoming
    replied
    Originally posted by mintee View Post
    Yeah, I've worked in a pro bakery, and been making breads since I was a kid, but sometimes things still don't work out they way I want. Doughs aren't as easy as riding a bicycle.

    Are you happy with your terra cotta chimney insert? I'm at the point now of ordering mine, and I really want the shiney Duratech listed here on FornoBravo, but I just added it to cart, and with shipping it's going to run me about $550! Yikes!
    Yeah, so far so good! I got the 8 x 12 x 24 (outer dimensions) clay flue liner from Menards for around $13. My local Menards didn't have one, but I ordered online and had it shipped to the store for free.

    david s gave me some good advice in post #172 of my thread to insulate the flue liner before firing it up and referenced a video of them cracking/exploding if the inside heats too much faster than the outside. I wrapped it in some scrap blanket insulation and haven't had any problems. I will eventually brick around the whole thing.

    I agree on the Duratech... I wanted to go that route too, more for convenience than anything, but decided that I've been spending too much on this oven lately and that was one place I thought I could save a little. I will still probably use $30 worth of bricks to enclose the clay liner, but it still comes out to be quite a bit less than the duratech double wall...

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  • mintee
    replied
    Yeah, I've worked in a pro bakery, and been making breads since I was a kid, but sometimes things still don't work out they way I want. Doughs aren't as easy as riding a bicycle.

    Are you happy with your terra cotta chimney insert? I'm at the point now of ordering mine, and I really want the shiney Duratech listed here on FornoBravo, but I just added it to cart, and with shipping it's going to run me about $550! Yikes!

    Leave a comment:


  • slschoming
    replied
    Originally posted by mintee View Post

    I love that this is a problem! Great work sls. My progress has slowed down, but I'm still right behind ya. I love that you did cookies too! Get some more pizza pictures up, and yes as Russel said, patience. If you've never worked with dough before, it's 90% technique and timing and only 10% ingredients. Practice and patience is the key.
    We lived in Italy for a year right after we were married and helped a friend open a restaurant. I got pretty decent with the oven by the time we left, but it's been 11 years and 3 kids ago so it's all a little foggy in my memory, haha...

    A big part of our problem here is that it was raining on us both times we tried pizza so we were rushing around with everything and just trying to keep ourselves and our flour dry.. Next spring I am hoping to build a roof over the oven and extend my chimney so it's 3 feet above the roof.

    We're going to do some more pizza on Saturday evening and so far the forecast says "Sunny" so we'll see how it goes.

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  • mintee
    replied
    Originally posted by slschoming View Post

    ...but the crust would actually ignite before my cheese would melt..
    I love that this is a problem! Great work sls. My progress has slowed down, but I'm still right behind ya. I love that you did cookies too! Get some more pizza pictures up, and yes as Russel said, patience. If you've never worked with dough before, it's 90% technique and timing and only 10% ingredients. Practice and patience is the key.

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  • zoolander
    replied
    Originally posted by slschoming View Post

    I haven't been very good at monitoring temps, I basically wait for the whole dome to clear and that's when I push all the fire and coals to the side. We have only done pizza twice, (we've done a lot of other cooking / baking in the residual heat).. I had a small fire left on the side of the oven, but it didn't look like the flame was wicking across the top of the dome...it must have been, or I must've gotten a little too close because before I knew it my crust was on fire.. It went out immediately when I lowered it to the floor and the pizza was fine...
    I hear you....There is definitely a learning curve. One of our favorite local restaurants has a gas fired pizza oven purchased from forno bravo. I've kinda been obsessed with monitoring oven temps while cooking and I noticed that they keep their oven at 500 degrees. At this temp they get a pizza out in around 3-4 minutes and they achieve a nice crust with cooked toppings. I like to be around 700 degrees which gets me into the 2-3 minute range but you really need to watch the thickness of the crust as too thick at this temp can yield an underdone pizza. I'm trying to keep some mental notes in order to come up with the best combo. Zoo

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  • Gulf
    replied
    It's a long story but, I'm getting away from using aluminum in or around my oven. But, going back to the Dave's post about the aluminum baking tray (they are thicker than foil.) Place a few layers of wrinkled foil between the baking tray layer and the wood. The random air spaces will buy a lot of time before the wood reaches a combustable temperature.
    Last edited by Gulf; 10-07-2019, 05:57 PM.

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  • cobblerdave
    replied
    Originally posted by slschoming View Post

    I've been using a piece of ply without foil, but have been waiting for the oven to cool to around 400 F before putting the door in place. Can you use the foiled door immediately after a pizza bake without burning up the plywood?
    G’day
    well one definite way to find out I recon, try it with the foil. If it burns... Mer... build anothery

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