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36" Corner Build in Minnesota

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    You just have a big weep hole. IMHO, between the insulation and the floor bricks, they will span this area. No one will ever remember that the whoops is there.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    OK, I had a large gathering for Labor Day weekend and haven’t made good progress but today I went to pop through the weep holes and ended up with a large crater.

    how bad is this? Can I just patch with surface bonding cement or another product? It’s right in the heart of where the oven will sit.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Thanks for the feedback on the countertops. I took the forms off the other day with no issues. The 3 piece support legs worked well for removal. I only had to make one cut with the reciprocating saw for the removal.

    Today I worked on no-weld IT 2.0. Will put it all together tomorrow and work on the floor and arch configurations.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    I used a Hardin concrete angle polisher that had a GFI in the power cord as well as variable speed and water supply line. It is built specifically for wet polishing concrete counters. They are spendy but better safe than sorry. These do make a mess, I was decked out in full wet gear.

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  • david s
    replied
    Be careful when recommending the use of electrical tools that are not designed for wet operation. A dedicated concrete polishing machine is fitted with an electrical cutout to prevent electrocution. They also have a variable speed control. A standard angle grinder does not have a speed control. A much slower speed is required for controlled polishing.

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  • deejayoh
    replied
    I used Stadea wet/dry diamond polishing disks on my angle grinder. Available @ amazon for about $35 if you time it right. Together with a throw-away harbor freight angle grinder, it works well if you can also set up a slow stream of water onto the countertop. It does make a mess though. Get some foulies!

    Leave a comment:


  • RandyJ
    replied
    For polishing the counter i bought a set of pads off Amazon that i put on my R.O. Sander. It did a pretty good job but i completely destroyed the sander. As for building the enclosure i knid of cut a stud to the height i wanted in the front then saw what would clear and look good for the back. So it was pretty much just flying by the seat of my pants. I have a bad habit of winging things like that , it really drives my wife nuts because I just build to a evolving picture in my mind and she just can't see it no matter what I do to explain it.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    RandyJ - I was planning on sanding/smoothing the countertop wings because they will show but not the area under the oven. My plan is to enclose the oven much like your first one. How did you approach yours?

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  • RandyJ
    replied
    Looking good. Are you going to plan on polishing the concrete? If so do it before you put any cladding on the base. It makes more than a bit of a mess. It is not hard to do though.

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  • Baza
    replied
    Our own muscles collectively ache looking at that pour!
    Great work! Really looking terrific!

    Good of you to hold yourself to a timeline - it can get away from you without one at times!

    Keep the pics and enthusiasm coming!
    Barry

    Leave a comment:


  • NCMan
    replied
    Looks good. I know you're glad to have that part done.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    My mad dash during this “catch up” week to meet my goal of having the hearth/counters done by Labor Day ended well today. Right, wrong or other they’re in. Long day! To NCMan’s point, I used shims on all the vertical supports. Additionally, all the vertical supports are three pieces with deck screws so hopefully removal will go smoothly.

    Time for a beer!

    Leave a comment:


  • NCMan
    replied
    Originally posted by SableSprings View Post
    Chris, it doesn't matter which side of the durarock is "up"- adequate rebar & forms are what makes a difference. As long as it's properly supported from below for the weight of the wet concrete (and hopefully you've included some small shims to make temporary supports easier to remove once the cement is set ). Without shims/removal plan, cutting out wood forms is sometimes much more work than it should be after the weight of concrete is applied...

    Relax! It's looking to be a great build.
    Excellent advice. Highly recommend doing the shims. If it were mine, I'd use a vapor barrier over the cement board.

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  • SableSprings
    replied
    Chris, it doesn't matter which side of the durarock is "up"- adequate rebar & forms are what makes a difference. As long as it's properly supported from below for the weight of the wet concrete (and hopefully you've included some small shims to make temporary supports easier to remove once the cement is set ). Without shims/removal plan, cutting out wood forms is sometimes much more work than it should be after the weight of concrete is applied...

    Relax! It's looking to be a great build.

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Help! Which side of the durarock faces up to pour concrete on??

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