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36" Corner Build in Minnesota

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    The Forno Bravo plans call for a layer of fireclay paste on FB and under floor. If the hearth and therefore the insulation is level, is this step necessary??

    Thoughts??
    My answer is 'no'. If everything is flat and no additional support is needed, I'd say you could bypass the bedding layer. FWIW, I did not bed my insulation, it was simply dry set.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I am laying out the transition from inner dome arch to the outer vent arch. I have planned a 1in offset between the two with a 1/2in notch as a thermal break. In looking at the pic, the flange that will create the overlap of the outer arch over the inner arch will only be 1/2in which just feels like not enough. I think i either need to increase the offset of the outer arch to 1.5 or 2 inches or lengthen the vent arch from 9in (1 std brick) to ~12in in order to support the chimney space. The cardboard on top represents the 10in needed to support the chimney anchor plate.

    If i need to increase the offset of the outer arch, i will need to widen my planned floor footprint.

    Any thoughts from yodas out there?

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Another question regarding the high temp mortar…the FB recipe calls for:

    •1 part Portland cement
    •3 parts sand
    •1 part lime
    •1 part fireclay

    Regarding the sand, is this meant to be regular play sand or a silica sand? For the lime, this is meant to be a hydrated lime I believe.

    Also, other than cost, what are pros/cons of using a store bought high temp mortar such as the Akona medium duty refractory dry mix or a premix such as Meeco’s red devil fireplace fire brick mortar in a bucket?

    thanks,

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I spent the weekend reviewing my build plans, laying out my arch templates, screening the weep holes and cutting/laying tile on hearth as FB underlayment. I have a question about the placement of the oven floor on the FB. The Forno Bravo plans call for a layer of fireclay paste on FB and under floor. If the hearth and therefore the insulation is level, is this step necessary??

    Thoughts??

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    mongota - I like that option for the floor thermal break. Thanks!

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Is a 1/2inch an appropriate gap between the dome floor and entry way? I’ve seen some builds use a stainless steel channel on top of fiber board used on the floor. Thoughts?
    Another way is to cut back the edge of the brick where the oven floor meets the landing floor. It may help reduce conductive heat loss between the two. I don't think it's much of a true performance benefit unless you're really fighting to save every bit of heat loss you can. The lower part of the cutback could be filled with insulation. Let ash fill the top of the gap to seal it off.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by mongota; 09-13-2021, 08:09 PM. Reason: edit to try to shrink the photo. No luck!

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  • david s
    replied
    Thermal expansion will take up 5 mm at most for the temps we fire to. Using a highly conductive material in a gap designed to prevent conductive heat transfer is counter intuitive IMO. The gap’s primary function is to act as an expansion joint to prevent stresses on areas that are cooler. It will reduce conductive heat somewhat, but a small gap will do little to reduce heat by radiation.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I spent some time today after grinding and sanding the hearth/counters yesterday to layout the floor for dome and entry. I’m planning a thermal break between the inner arch and vent arch. I have some 1/2inch fiber cord and fiberfrax to seal arch. Is a 1/2inch an appropriate gap between the dome floor and entry way? I’ve seen some builds use a stainless steel channel on top of fiber board used on the floor. Thoughts?

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    AlSi is comparable to CaSi, Do you know what the compression strength is? it should be at least or around 70 PSI.@5% compression.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I don’t have the calsil board. My plan was to put 3 layers of 1in unifrax duraboard made from alumina silica I got at Smith-Sharpe (see photo). Should I have something different.

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  • david s
    replied
    This always happens when the drill breaks through to the other side. Drilling a smaller pilot hole first reduces the size of the divot.

    It actually provides better drainage towards the hole so is actually an advantage. Like Randy pointed out the cal sil board will bridge over it quite ok.
    Last edited by david s; 09-07-2021, 08:51 PM.

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  • RandyJ
    replied
    As long as it is not right where the dome will sit my guess is that it will be just fine. The calsil board is pretty stiff stuff and would seem to be unlikely to sag. If you are really worried you could patch it up. You are not real far from me if you are very concerned i would be happy to swing by and take a look to put your mind at ease.

    Randy

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    You just have a big weep hole. IMHO, between the insulation and the floor bricks, they will span this area. No one will ever remember that the whoops is there.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    OK, I had a large gathering for Labor Day weekend and haven’t made good progress but today I went to pop through the weep holes and ended up with a large crater.

    how bad is this? Can I just patch with surface bonding cement or another product? It’s right in the heart of where the oven will sit.

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Thanks for the feedback on the countertops. I took the forms off the other day with no issues. The 3 piece support legs worked well for removal. I only had to make one cut with the reciprocating saw for the removal.

    Today I worked on no-weld IT 2.0. Will put it all together tomorrow and work on the floor and arch configurations.

    Leave a comment:

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