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36" Corner Build in Minnesota

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Here are a couple tips. Use your best bricks on the back half of the dome. Do interior joint space/alignment adjustment in the front half of the dome (this area is never seen after the dome is completed. Last brick of the day, lay one brick on the next course at center back. It becomes an anchor for laying that course and as you go higher it really helps. Finally keep the tapered arch bring install ahead of the dome course, easier to tie into.

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    You should be able to get in a course a day now. I was never able to do more than one in a day, but one seemed like just the right amount of work.
    It's looking good by the way ;-)

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Another milestone as I got the 2nd course down and the first inner arch stones mortared in. Today was a good day.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I made some progress this weekend. I got the inner arch laid out and the first course mortared down.

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  • RandyJ
    replied
    Yes just use square bricks with a bevel on the sides. It is so much easier and produces a oven that is just as strong as the other.

    As for the jig and exact angles i would think that is going to be very hard to get correct. I just took bricks cutoffs and used them tobprop the bricks i was cutting how i wanted them. Just did it all by sight and worked out great.

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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Plus one on a proper IT, no shims required,

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  • JRPizza
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    RandyJ
    With this, my focus would be on the placement of brick and the brick shims to maintain the correct angle to the centerpoint....
    You aren't going to need shims for dome brick orientation if you use a properly built IT. The tool will set the bricks at the proper angle - you can butter up the brick and press it in place with the inner and upper surfaces "indexed" against the IT. Shims would be an unnecessary step. The only time I used shims was when I was dry stacking bricks for an arch or something and they never stayed in place when I was mortaring.
    Also, the spread sheet is a good tool, but I found I could go faster with the following method. Use a sliding t-bevel (cheap at the box stores) to determine the angle you need to eliminate the Vee, You determine the angle by placing the t-bevel on a brick and setting the angle 90 degrees to the horizon - then it is easy to transfer the angle to whatever you are using on your saw to hold the bricks at an angle. As for brick width, cut your bricks so the width at the bottom is the same as the width of the top of the bricks in the row below. If you do this you will be able to have perfectly (cosmetically) aligned joints as long as you start in the back for each row and don't use any odd size bricks where they can be seen. I don't know that you need to do this as my oven cracked right through a few bricks - the lack of alignment of joints did not mean no cracks.


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  • UtahBeehiver
    replied
    Look at JR Pizza's build, he did not to tapers(angles) only bevels, these bevels do NOT need to run the entire depth of the brick only where the two interior brick faces conflict. This is what causes the "inverted V mortar joint. I did full tapers(angles) and bevels on my build and it took a lot of time and set up. If I were to build another I would go the JR route and let mortar backfill the back side (it is your friend).


    Click image for larger version

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  • NCMan
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Targeting to get the first course sitting on top of floor. A couple of questions to verify the FB plans:

    1) 1st course on the floor can be cut to fit, no mortar below or between
    2) for the 2nd course and above, the bottom face should align and be placed directly on the course below (no mortar gap). Sides and back supported by mortar to keep the correct angle
    3) if using a Chipster style jig with the dome spreadsheet dimensions for cuts, do I need to angle my first cut of start with the 2nd. I believe the spreadsheet assumes the 1st course is part of my floor.

    looking for some confirmations before diving in.

    As always, feel like I’m over thinking some things and overlooking important things.

    Thanks,
    There should be mortar in between the first course bricks, but not under.
    Last edited by NCMan; 09-30-2021, 02:04 PM.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    RandyJ - Thanks for your input. Getting the angle and bevel clear. In your recommendation, I should only focus on the "Side Angle" in the spreadsheet and stick to the "Cut Brick Dimensions". This would make the process so much more simple which is what i can handle. Correct??

    With this, my focus would be on the placement of brick and the brick shims to maintain the correct angle to the centerpoint.

    Getting the jig the precise inclination is very difficult.

    Thanks again for input.

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  • RandyJ
    replied
    Do not bother with angel and beveled cuts both. In my honest opinion just do beveled cuts as you get higher in the courses. The amount of work required to do the other way is incredible and a tiny error will cause huge problems. Also no one but you would know anything different and it will not look any different from the inside. If I built a 2nd oven i would not even consider the more difficult way. I didn't even build a jig when i built mine. I just used shims and the cutting sled on my harbor freight saw. Also mrchipster used a 14" saw and that would be necessary to make all the cuts with the jig i believe. A standard 10" blade is not big enough.

    I cut my floor to fit inside the dome so i don't have any insight as to how to make that work. I had used a strip of cardboard as a spacer for expansion and contraction. I hope some of this helps

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Targeting to get the first course sitting on top of floor. A couple of questions to verify the FB plans:

    1) 1st course on the floor can be cut to fit, no mortar below or between
    2) for the 2nd course and above, the bottom face should align and be placed directly on the course below (no mortar gap). Sides and back supported by mortar to keep the correct angle
    3) if using a Chipster style jig with the dome spreadsheet dimensions for cuts, do I need to angle my first cut of start with the 2nd. I believe the spreadsheet assumes the 1st course is part of my floor.

    looking for some confirmations before diving in.

    As always, feel like I’m over thinking some things and overlooking important things.

    Thanks,

    Leave a comment:


  • david s
    replied
    If any leveller is required it works better if it's applied dry.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I forged ahead today and blew past the point of no return. Winter is coming and I needed to either go or stop until spring.

    Laying the insulation went well. If I would to do it again, I would follow Mongo’s advice and forgo the fireclay paste. What a fiasco. I had two restarts, I finally realized the FB instructions did not work for me. I started with a “sticky mortar” consistency but as I laid it down, it would set before I could get two bricks down. For the second half, it worked ok but struggled to keep level and ended with a couple gaps that were bigger than I hoped. Hopefully ash will settle and fill those after a while.

    I kept the vent plan at 9” but do have a couple inches that I could extend, if needed. JR - Thanks for the pics. If I can ask, how wide was your vent opening in the outer arch?

    It was a full day today and will need to push forward over the next three days in hopes of getting the dome complete, cured and enclosed before the snow flies.

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  • mongota
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    mongota - Thanks for the feedback on both points. On the fireclay paste, I realized today when I was laying out the floor that not all firebricks are created equal. Some are slightly thicker/thinner and I think the base layer will help ensure an even floor. Did you have any issues with those?

    C
    I culled my pallet of bricks to find the ones most uniform in size and set those aside for the oven and landing floor. I'd take five or so bricks at a time, stack them like a deck of cards, and flip them all at once from one edge to another on a flat surface so the irregularly-sized ones would stand out. I set the odd sized ones aside. Then I'd compare for thickness. Once I had a sufficient number of uniformly-sized bricks I laid them out on my oven floor template in my desired herringbone pattern.

    Even after the initial cull, after laying them out I still had to swap a few more bricks out. Sometimes I could rotate one end-for-end, or I'd swap one brick in the pattern for another brick in the pattern to minimize lippage. Or toss an outlier back on the pallet and find one more appropriate. It really didn't take long to do.

    Once I had a decently smooth floor, I numbered the bricks, took a photo for reference, cut the bricks to the floor pattern and set them on the insulation.

    Even after you build, if you end up with a brick edge that interferes with your peel easily sliding across the floor, you can ease the edge with a light pass of an angle grinder. I haven't had to do that, but I have seen posts from others who have done that.
    MnDude45

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