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36" Corner Build in Minnesota

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  • Mr. Slowhand
    replied
    The oven is coming great. Just for my comparison, how thick is you blanket, when you say you do 3 or 4 layers, at what thickness do you come to ultimately.

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  • Sixto
    replied
    Looks great! - I can almost smell the pizza!

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Another step closer. I finished the 3rd insulation layer and added almost another full layer on the top. Click image for larger version

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  • david s
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Thanks for the feedback. I’m going with an enclosure so not planning any render coat.
    Sorry, my apologies. That eliminates a lot of drying, sealing and venting problems.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Thanks for the feedback. I’m going with an enclosure so not planning any render coat.

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  • david s
    replied
    Perhaps instead of getting more blanket, a layer of 10:1 vermicrete (which has around the same insulation value as the blanket) would be an alternative option. You will go through a ton of render trying to restore a nice form and the blanket is not a firm substrate to render against.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I just laid the blanket over the dome and propped them on with scrap 2x4’s. It worked well until I determined I was going to run short on blanket. I had enough for 2.6672 of the 3in to cover the entire dome. Ugh! I’ll have to run tomorrow and get another roll.

    Click image for larger version

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  • SableSprings
    replied
    Just put the layers of batting over the dome...no need to use adhesives of any kind. Since you should go through the curing process before applying stucco over the blanket, you can lean some bricks around the perimeter & couple on top to hold it in place if you choose not to lay chicken wire or metal lath over it. Just remember to wear a good mask, gloves, & goggles to protect your eyes...the ceramic fibers can be very irritating!

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Quick question…when applying the ceramic blanket to the dome, did anyone use an a hi temp adhesive or just lay it on and hope there’s not a strong wind? When I’m done, I’ll use a thin galvanized wire to hold it in place. It’s really just for the time putting all three layers down.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Today i was able to trim the excess floor and insulation in order to prep for dome insulation. Also, I installed the chimney anchor plate. I decided to use the 1/4 x 4” Tapcon anchor screws. I bought a new hammer drill from all of our favorite store (Harbor Freight) and installation went well. On to dome insulation and curing fires soon. So much excitement and terror at the same time as it is getting very real. Again, is it the light at the end of the tunnel or the train??

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Mr. Slowhand - Sad that you had that happen but grateful you were able to catch it at this time rather than later. Keep moving forward, Marko. You are making great progress.

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  • Mr. Slowhand
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Mr. Slowhand - It did not work out well on mine. The hairline crack didn't show the issues through the arch. When I removed the arch form, the arch came apart in pieces. Hopefully, you will not experience the same. Overall, I only lost about a day and a half it it appears to be strong now. Good Luck!
    He, was just clearing to fill in some cracks, when entire actually the entire arch was loose. It came in 2 pieces. I still have the arch form, so cleaned it, soaked, and re-mortared it. So glad you told me what you did, so I checked for structural integrity before I continued.
    Only one evening lost, TBH, not a biggie

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  • Sixto
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    ..... I need to remove the pop-up to run the fires but don't want to leave it uncovered for a week.

    I thought I'd insulate and then build the walls of the enclosure to allow a tarp/cover during the night.
    I like that idea, hadn't thought of removing the pop-up myself (tent on fire!)and I have no permanent surround planned. When my time for drying fires comes, I'll lash some 2x2's together to make a teepee of sorts using the tent-top over the dome (but not over the flue) to make sure any water sheds off it, instead of pooling on top.. thanks!

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Originally posted by james View Post
    Curing your oven is an important step in the installation of any brick oven -- whether it is a Forno Bravo precast oven, a Forno Bravo Artigiano brick oven, or a Pompeii brick oven. Heating up your oven too fast can lead to cracks. You have invested a great deal of time, money and energy in your oven, so go slow, and cure your oven properly. If at all possible, don't schedule a pizza party the weekend your dome is finished.

    After you have installed your oven, there is still a great deal of moisture in the mortars, hearth concrete, vermiculite, and the oven chamber and vent themselves. Each of these oven components was recently produced using an air-drying, water-based process. Simply letting the oven stand for a week does very little to "cure" the moisture out of them oven. In fact, the Forno Bravo precast oven producer recommends letting the oven stand for a week after it has been assembled before "starting" the curing process. Thicker sections of concrete can take many weeks to cure.

    You are trying to avoid two problems. First, any mortar or concrete that dries too fast shrinks and cracks. These cracks can let hot air and/or smoke escape from the oven chamber. Second, if you bring your oven up to heat while there is still sufficient moisture in the oven dome or mortars, you will actually create steam, which can produce hairline fractures, or even cracks in your oven. I heard a story (possibly an urban legend) from one of our installers who used to work with one of our competitor's ovens, where the home owner lit such a large fire in a non-cured oven that a chunk of the oven dome actually blew out the front door. Hmmm. Maybe.

    Also, using a space heater can help, but only so far. It is not an alternative to fire curing. We ran a space heater in an assembled Forno Bravo precast oven for two days, then quickly heated the oven up, (don't do this at home -- it was an experiment to see what would happen to an oven that we have here) and we found that we created a very large amount of steam from the oven, mortars and vermiculite, which went on for hours and hours.

    To be safe, here is a good curing schedule.

    1. Let the oven sit for a week or so after you have finished the dome.
    2. Run a series of seven fires, starting with a small, newspaper-only fire.
    3. Increase the size of the fire each day by about 100F
    200F
    300F
    400F
    500F
    600F
    700F
    800F
    4. Let the oven fall back to cool as soon as you reach the temperature you want. It is important to bring the oven up to heat gently, then back down to cold, each time.
    5. If you don't have an infrared thermometer, try this schedule:
    Newspaper only
    Newspaper and a little kindling
    1 stick of 2"x3"X16" wood
    2 sticks of wood
    3 sticks of wood
    4 sticks of wood
    5 sticks of wood

    James

    Also, here is the firing post from several years ago...Any other suggestions from the group??

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    Thanks for your thoughts. I liked the thought of the galvanized flashing under the cement board. I hadn't thought of that.

    What are your thoughts on how to protect the dome during the curing fires? I need to remove the pop-up to run the fires but don't want to leave it uncovered for a week.

    I thought I'd insulate and then build the walls of the enclosure to allow a tarp/cover during the night.

    Leave a comment:

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