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36" Corner Build in Minnesota

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  • Sixto
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Alright, I'm planning on building the enclosure around my oven on the concrete countertops. Steel framing with 1/2" Durock cement board with Rock-on fastners.

    Questions -

    1) For the framing track on the countertops, is there a vapor barrier or concrete adhesive placed between counter and track? Typically what I see is some sort of compressible foam or a few beads of caulk to keep moisture from seeping in at the base. If your studs can be flush with the edge of the counter, I would extend the durock to the bottom edge of counter slab, and seal the edge with caulk. If not, I would add galvanized flashing at the base of the durock, so if any snow piles up against it, it has to climb 4-6" up the back of the durock to make it into the enclosure.
    2) I'm assuming stainless steel anchors to hold track against counter I agree.
    3) The most common widths of framing is either 2.5" or ~3.5". Does is matter for this application? I would think this is small enough that 2.5" wall studs should be enough, but I'm not a structural engineer and overbuilding won't hurt.
    4) The most common gauges found at Big Boxs are 20ga or 25ga. The 25ga at Menards says "For interior, non-weight bearing walls". Do I need to ensure galvanized and use a 20ga or possible 18ga? For sure Galvanized studs, othewise they will rust. Gauge, I'm not sure.

    I'm planning on placing the 3" of fiber blanket this weekend and start curing fires but need the enclosure to be fast follow to keep it dry.

    Thoughts??
    Comments in red above.

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Alright, I'm planning on building the enclosure around my oven on the concrete countertops. Steel framing with 1/2" Durock cement board with Rock-on fastners.

    Questions -

    1) For the framing track on the countertops, is there a vapor barrier or concrete adhesive placed between counter and track?
    2) I'm assuming stainless steel anchors to hold track against counter
    3) The most common widths of framing is either 2.5" or ~3.5". Does is matter for this application?
    4) The most common gauges found at Big Boxs are 20ga or 25ga. The 25ga at Menards says "For interior, non-weight bearing walls". Do I need to ensure galvanized and use a 20ga or possible 18ga?

    I'm planning on placing the 3" of fiber blanket this weekend and start curing fires but need the enclosure to be fast follow to keep it dry.

    Thoughts??

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Slowhand
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Mr. Slowhand - It did not work out well on mine. The hairline crack didn't show the issues through the arch. When I removed the arch form, the arch came apart in pieces. Hopefully, you will not experience the same. Overall, I only lost about a day and a half it it appears to be strong now. Good Luck!
    Good info. I wanted to keep the arch form, as I am casting a flue shortly. With this info, I will first remove the arch, see if the thing can stay on it's feet, and than put the (smaller) arch form for the sand mould back. You are right, a day and a half are not a big issue when building these things

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Mr. Slowhand - It did not work out well on mine. The hairline crack didn't show the issues through the arch. When I removed the arch form, the arch came apart in pieces. Hopefully, you will not experience the same. Overall, I only lost about a day and a half it it appears to be strong now. Good Luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Slowhand
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Alright, I know all ovens have cracks but…

    I noticed this hairline crack in the outer arch. It’s directly in the middle on the last brick I laid. It runs 2/3 down the front and all across the top. It doesn’t appear noticeable in the back (chimney vent).

    Should I be concerned enough to remove, replace the brick and re-mortar before the removal of the arch form? Or just fill and move forward??

    Thoughts??
    I have the same in my oven. I used a scalpel to remove as much as possible of the mortar, and will add new mortar. It was directly next to the keystone of the arch. Don't know if it was a good thing to do, I just could not bear to see it, it is the only exposed arch towards the outside

    Leave a comment:


  • Sixto
    replied
    I got 1/4" x 3" s.s. bolts at my local Menards. Using lockwasher on top, recessing bottom of bolt in mortar-filled part of brick, so it won't turn when I tighten bolt down. Will cast a sloped cement cap with fiber reinforcement over the whole thing to shed water and snow.

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Sixto - What size diameter SS anchors are you using? The specs say to use 1/4” but I can’t seem to find any SS in that size.

    On the vent, as you can see in post 173 I placed the front and back arched pieces first and let them set. Then I I cut the interior bricks to size using a cardboard template and mortared them together before placing them on the arch. I cut a notch to rest on the arch with mortar and supported it with a scrap 2x4 until set. Then I did the same on the other side. It looks like you did some nice shaping of the bricks for yours.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sixto
    replied
    Originally posted by MnDude45 View Post
    Sixto - Thanks for the comments. Regarding your questions:
    "
    1) I'm using the Duratech double walled system with a 10" anchor plate.
    2) I plan to wrap with 3" fiber blanket and build an enclosure with steel framing and cement board so the dome will not be directly exposed to the Minnesota seasons.
    3) I learned the hard way on the outer arch. I built the arch in one day working from the outsides to the top of the arch.
    Thanks Chris! I am using the exact same Duratech system, and thought about using screws, but changed to SS bolts after reading comments similar to David's previous post. I'm not sure how Tapcons work, but if they oxidate, and you cant get them in S.S. then I would perhaps try pre-filling the hole with high temp silicone or adhesive and install the screws into that while wet, so there's less chance of moisture finding its way into the space between the screw and brick.

    You are doing it right with the enclosure. I have a relatively small backyard, and I want to keep the dome visible, so I'm left figuring out how to protect it, both this winter with stucco only, and also after I add tile. Right now, I'm thinking of using some sort of vapor-permeable, waterproof coating on the stucco, then adding a tarp above that.

    Regarding #3, I was asking more about the 10 bricks that make the transition between the arch and the square chimney. But I see in one of your photos that your opening for the anchor plate is square on the inside too, so your 6 bricks in the center are not cantilevered out into the opening... I'm doing something slightly different, and when i set my 12 bricks on top of the arch, the 4 bricks that cantilever in the center, tend to tip into the opening...so I'm thinking of mortaring pairs together before setting them on top of the arch, and also adding support sticks below so they have a chance to hold each other up better. Attaching photo to help visualize...

    Click image for larger version

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  • david s
    replied
    Heat and moisture together will accelerate rusting so any fixings should only be stainless.

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Sixto - Thanks for the comments. Regarding your questions:
    "
    1) I'm using the Duratech double walled system with a 10" anchor plate. My plan is to attach with hi temp sealant and anchor with four 1/4"x4" Tapcon anchor screws. I have a Tapcon 3/16" carbide tipped concrete bit for the anchor holes. My biggest fear is cracking the bricks of the vent.
    2) I plan to wrap with 3" fiber blanket and build an enclosure with steel framing and cement board so the dome will not be directly exposed to the Minnesota seasons. I'm currently debating the running of the curing fires before or after the insulation. This is a very hot topic for many out here. If I run the curing fires before insulation, I take the risk of the extreme temp changes during curing with the risk of cracks. If I wait until after insulation, I think I may need to build the enclosure to protect from weather.
    3) I learned the hard way on the outer arch. I built the arch in one day working from the outsides to the top of the arch. When I got the the final 2-3 bricks, I put pressure on them to get them into place. When I did this, bricks in the middle of both side of the arch raised and became unset. When I removed the form (as outlined in posts 166-168), the arch collapsed. When I rebuilt the arch, I completed the 1st five bricks on each side and let it set. The next day I set the next three bricks on each side and let them set. The final day I spent cutting and placing each of the remaining four bricks with a cross support to finish the arch. It has held thus far with now the weight of the chimney vent with no cracks that I can see.

    That's probable more than you wanted to know but let me know if you have any other questions or comments

    Leave a comment:


  • Sixto
    replied
    Looks great! Took me a while to figure out what the black crinkly stuff was... garbage bag! I'm looking forward to seeing how you attach the metal to brick if you have a metal flue. I'm doing something very similar to your vent configuration, and tried drilling 4 holes into brick to attach the stainless flue base plate with stainless through-bolts and found that to be a long slow process with a masonry bit. I am also interested in exploring alternative strategies for how to protect this ares around the flue from ice and snow (other than building a canopy above or throwing a tarp over it). My outer layer will be terra cotta tiles, but I won't get to that till next spring.

    oh, also any words of wisdom about mortaring-in the 10 curved bricks? Keeping the whole assembly square and level, and preventing the center bricks from tipping-in? Did you mortar the center 3 bricks together before putting them in between the 2 ends?
    thanks!
    Last edited by Sixto; 08-16-2022, 06:04 AM.

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  • MnDude45
    replied
    I was able to finish the chimney vent this past weekend. So far, it appears to be holding together well.

    Its getting real now as I prepare to get the insulation on and the enclosure layout finalized. I will be posting some questions in the coming days about some of the steps to finish.
    Attached Files

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  • mongota
    replied
    Nice progress! I;m playing catch-up on a few threads tonight

    I did the same for the transition from the arch to the chimney anchor plate, I mortared my bricks together (two sets of six bricks) in a form and popped the form and the 12 bricks on top of the arch all at once. Once the mortar set I removed the wood form. Worked great and ensured a level and flat surface for the chimney anchor plate.

    Leave a comment:


  • MnDude45
    replied
    Spent some time in Texas last week catching up with family. So was not able to progress much until this weekend.

    Before the trip, I was able to cut and grind the first platform bricks for the chimney vent.

    Yesterday I was able to get them mortared into place. I spent some extra time ensuring it was plumb, square and level.

    Today I constructed the side supports for the vent. I decided to build them using bricks cut from a cardboard template and mortared them together before placing them onto the arch. We’ll see if this strategy works or creates other issues. Fingers crossed.

    I hope to get the prices into place in the next couple days in order to finish the chimney vent and get the anchor plate installed by this weekend.

    Click image for larger version

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    Attached Files
    Last edited by MnDude45; 08-07-2022, 05:31 PM.

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  • RandyJ
    replied
    Looking good. You will be able to start curing fires soon.

    Leave a comment:

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